.318 Westley Richards

sestoppelman

AH ambassador
Joined
Apr 25, 2010
Messages
8,416
Reaction score
9,781
Media
175
Articles
2
Hunting reports
Africa
3
Member of
NRA, NA Hunt Club
Hunted
Tanzania, Botswana, Zimbabwe (2), Namibia (2), South Africa (2)
I certainly agree in the similarities of the WR and .338-06 and similar rounds, nearly identical in performance. However I would note that 250 grs is not a heavy weight in the .338 caliber. For years Speer made a 275 gr and I believe at least one maker still does, Swift I think. Plus Sierra makes a 300 gr match bullet. In fact Winchester used to load a 300 gr slug as well for the Win mag. But not to pick the nit, LOL!:rolleyes::D:D:D
 

rookhawk

AH legend
Joined
Mar 4, 2015
Messages
3,886
Reaction score
6,275
Location
North America
Media
151
Articles
2
Member of
NRA Life Benefactor, Trout Unlimited, Safari Club International
Some years ago I looked at a lovely Westley Richards double in .318....one of their gold name models...it looked like new on the outside and came in its oak and leather case, but alas.....both barrels were completely shot out...!

I have never seen such worn barrels in a double, sooner or later..

Reviving an old thread as I was just reviewing it. What @Pondoro witnessed were near perfect bores, not completely shot out bores. Wish I could have bought the rifle real cheap! .318 WR rifles by their namesake had a "hills and valleys" metford style rifling that had no crisp lands or grooves. That's how they were made and are quite accurate I've come to learn.
 

Pondoro

AH fanatic
Joined
Dec 3, 2014
Messages
954
Reaction score
1,331
Media
88
Articles
1
Hunted
Norway, Sweden, Namibia and Botswana
You may be right Rookhawk....this info is entirely new to me.....I have never heard of WR making doubles with such rifling. Charles Lancasters "oval bore" is rather usual to come by though...

Can you please elaborate, was this rifling unique to .318s only..??

The rifle was made ca. 1905 and cased in its original case.

The owner is a collector of doubles and thus turned me down to by it..
 

rookhawk

AH legend
Joined
Mar 4, 2015
Messages
3,886
Reaction score
6,275
Location
North America
Media
151
Articles
2
Member of
NRA Life Benefactor, Trout Unlimited, Safari Club International
@Pondoro i did some digging when I bought my .318. A friend and avid Westley collector told me don't worry, they all (318 magazine rifles) shoot fine and he never saw a very good bore. I bought mine and took it home for heavy cleaning. After foaming it dozens of times I had very clean rifling and it was obvious to me that it was not worn, it was made this way.

After much digging I found many breadcrumbs on this topic. Most experts call it metford rifling but it was not. Others call it Whitworth rifling and I wager that Westley had a trademark term for it.

In short, it has hills and valleys, not lands and grooves. Mine was from 1910. Unfortunately, it appears most people ruin/rebarrel these guns because they think the barrels are bad without shooting them first. At present there is one for sale as a take down rifle on GI and the owner says it's a collectible only as the bore is badly worn. (But he still wants $8k with a ruined stock!)

If you can find that Double I'd suggest you buy it!
 

rookhawk

AH legend
Joined
Mar 4, 2015
Messages
3,886
Reaction score
6,275
Location
North America
Media
151
Articles
2
Member of
NRA Life Benefactor, Trout Unlimited, Safari Club International
british_riflingB.jpg
 

Attachments

  • british_riflingB.jpg
    british_riflingB.jpg
    59 KB · Views: 273

Rule 303

AH fanatic
Joined
Oct 6, 2015
Messages
840
Reaction score
922
Location
Brisbane
Media
6
Hunted
Australia, New Zealand, Zimbabwe & Namibia
The W.E. Metford and the hills & valley rifling discribed sounds and looks similar to the rifling found in Glock pistols, polygon rifling. It works and is accurate. I often wondered if it would work in a rifle, know I know.

sestoppelman, I would venture that a 250 grain pill in a 338 is considered a heavy for calibre, Like a 275grn pill in a 358 is heavy for calibre. Yes I know even heavier bullets are made and I would also consider these as heavy or extremly heavy for calibre. The penetration on those 300grn 338 pills would be fantastic if the jacket is thick enough.
 

rookhawk

AH legend
Joined
Mar 4, 2015
Messages
3,886
Reaction score
6,275
Location
North America
Media
151
Articles
2
Member of
NRA Life Benefactor, Trout Unlimited, Safari Club International
@Rule 303 and @sestoppelman in defense of the .318WR, it is a heavy for caliber loading. A .318WR has a 250gr bullet with a diameter of .330". That would be a heavier for caliber loading than the 250gr .338" bullets you gentlemen are referencing.

I wanted to find the quote I read recently but the internet isn't producing the desired effect. I think it was WDM Bell or Taylor that stated the .318WR with the 250gr solid was the deepest penetrating rifle he had ever used. The reference was its use on a rhino where the bullet went from one end of the animal entirely to the other. Obviously the fact it was a good solid and that it was long for caliber both play into the likely reasons it wasn't prone to deflection, it had great sectional density and ballistic coefficient, etc.

To threadjack, while I was looking for the quote that didn't turn up I found this quote from an article on Westley Richards describing an old African's hunting battery in Kenya: "He was a man who had been around the block a few times with regards to hunting, control work and as an Honorary Game Warden in colonial times. His battery consisted of a very well looked after but battered .318 Westley Richards and a Cogswell and Harrison .375 H and H Magnum." I found the quote somewhat of an affirmation as I've culled my go-to guns for Africa and focused on just a couple remaining, the .375H&H Cogswell & Harrison and my .318WR I'm getting ready for Eland and Leopard use now. Someday I'll add on a vintage .470NE double or a .416Rigby magazine to complete a proper three gun battery for Africa.
 

Rule 303

AH fanatic
Joined
Oct 6, 2015
Messages
840
Reaction score
922
Location
Brisbane
Media
6
Hunted
Australia, New Zealand, Zimbabwe & Namibia
Roohawk, I agree. I was in fact saying that a 250 grain bullet in the 318 is a heavy for calibre projectile and I was referencing a 275 grain projectile in the 358 cal.:)

I like your African battery.(y)

On a slight side track Pondoro Taylor considered a 300grain 358 out of a 350 Rigby No.2 (from memory)to be an exceptional perpetrator as well. Yet bell did not like the long heavy 6.5's. He found the bullets would bend on hitting bone, like the back was trying to over take the front. He believed the jackets were to thin.

Nothing wrong with a lot of the old calibres and their loading's, they worked then and still work now.
 

Odinsraven

AH fanatic
Joined
May 25, 2013
Messages
667
Reaction score
682
Location
Iceland
Media
11
Hunting reports
Africa
5
Member of
NRA Life Membe,Icelandic Hunting Club SKOTVIS , BASC (UK) Countryside Alliance (UK)r
Hunted
UK ,Ireland, Bulgaria,Iceland,Czech Republic
Have a 1910 WR in 318 and a double of German origin

However the 17 project is a savage ridle stainless and suppressor in 318wr

Will keep you updated
 

Bob Nelson 35Whelen

AH ambassador
Joined
Oct 28, 2018
Messages
5,573
Reaction score
10,741
Location
Wyong new south Wales Australia
Media
13
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
SSAA
Hunted
Australia
CT I have honestly never seen a worn out barrel. I guess I've never been around someone who shoots that much. I've heard members of the military speaking of weapons with worn out barrels and replacing them.

I guess it takes a lot of rounds, 1000s to do it.
@CAustin
Mate come out to Australia and you will see plenty of worn out barrels. Roo shooters of yore would wear out a sako vixen 222 rem barrel a year. Naturally sako wouldn't believe this so sent a rep to check it out. Result was sako sold new barrels to Australia.
I have personally worn out a Remington 788 22/250 barrel hunting foxes, rabbits and pigs as well as a 303 barrel. When you have access to free 303 ammo it is easily done. I don't know how much 303 ammo is in a 200 litre drum but by the time it's gone your barrel isn't looking to good.
Bob
 

Tom Leoni

Bronze supporter
AH veteran
Joined
Nov 11, 2016
Messages
175
Reaction score
376
Location
Virginia
Media
21
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
NRA (Life), True Green Alliance
Hunted
USA, Africa, Canada, Europe
The second rifle from the left is my English classic Mauser in .318 WR. It's not going to Africa with me this coming season because my .375 single shot and my little 6.5x54mm called "dibs" before it. Also, my aging eyes would prefer it being, if not scoped (a pity for a 100% unaltered early-1930s original), at least outfitted with a cocking-piece peepsight. Still, there's a safari in my .318's near future and I can't wait to bloody it with a nice trophy or three. Trying it out with Woodleighs and Hawk bullets (religiously 250-grainers), although this "year of the lean cows" ammo-wise is not exactly conducive to extensive ballistic testing...

1616553376860.png
 

sestoppelman

AH ambassador
Joined
Apr 25, 2010
Messages
8,416
Reaction score
9,781
Media
175
Articles
2
Hunting reports
Africa
3
Member of
NRA, NA Hunt Club
Hunted
Tanzania, Botswana, Zimbabwe (2), Namibia (2), South Africa (2)
If a .338 win shoots a .338 dia bullet, and the .318 WR shoots a .330 bullet, how does that make the WR a .338 by any standard?o_O Two different bullet diameters cannot be called the same caliber. That would be like saying the .270 win (.277 dia) and the .280 Rem (.284 dia) are the same caliber when there is 7 thousands difference between them, nearly the same difference as the .338 and the .318 WR.
Just reread this thread and saw my comment here above. I must have been feeling a bit pissy that day as I was really nitpicking. Sorry Joe!:D Cheers:
 

Red Leg

Lifetime bronze benefactor
AH ambassador
Joined
May 19, 2009
Messages
7,361
Reaction score
23,263
Location
Texas Hill Country
Media
324
Articles
5
Hunting reports
Africa
3
USA/Canada
5
Mex/S.Amer
1
Europe
4
Member of
SCI DSC life memberships / NRA Patron Life
Hunted
Mexico, Namibia, RSA, Zambia, Germany, Austria, Argentina, Canada, Mozambique, Spain, US (15 states)
The second rifle from the left is my English classic Mauser in .318 WR. It's not going to Africa with me this coming season because my .375 single shot and my little 6.5x54mm called "dibs" before it. Also, my aging eyes would prefer it being, if not scoped (a pity for a 100% unaltered early-1930s original), at least outfitted with a cocking-piece peepsight. Still, there's a safari in my .318's near future and I can't wait to bloody it with a nice trophy or three. Trying it out with Woodleighs and Hawk bullets (religiously 250-grainers), although this "year of the lean cows" ammo-wise is not exactly conducive to extensive ballistic testing...

View attachment 394448
My two 318's have yet to go as well. Would bring one this summer to Tanzania, but want to play with the Rigby .275 with @spike.t . Both have at least taken whitetail and nilgai.

Westley Richards take down with period Griffin & Howe side mount.

Westley Richards 318 Express Take Down


Post WWI Cogswell & Harrison on a P-14 action
WR 318 Cogswell & Harrison


Though the C&H might also be a lot of fun ............ :unsure:
 

Cervus elaphus

AH fanatic
Joined
Feb 16, 2021
Messages
789
Reaction score
1,481
Location
Australia
Media
2
Hunted
New Zealand. SA on bucket list
Have some 318wr projects in the pipeline

One is a savage stainless modern plastic stock etc chambered for 318wr ....

The other is to restore a 1908 WR 318 by WR back to its former glory ....

I have also a 318wr double by BSW Shul in Germany .........I need help ........
You're a sick puppy alright, may it long continue !.
(just get a bigger gun safe)
 

Cervus elaphus

AH fanatic
Joined
Feb 16, 2021
Messages
789
Reaction score
1,481
Location
Australia
Media
2
Hunted
New Zealand. SA on bucket list
.318 Westley Richards
by Charlie Haley

The .318 Westley Richards is a real old African classic. Largely forgotten today, it was one of the most important of the pre-war sporting calibres. Never, of course, so widely used as the cheap and ubiquitous .303, it was nonetheless one of the most popular of what was termed the 'medium' bore sporting cartridges in the Africa of years ago. It was and still remains a fine choice for the Africa of today.

watermark.php

From left to right: .318 WR, .333 Jeffery, .30-06

The .318 was introduced in 1910, and was intended for Westley Richards sporting rifles with the comparatively new Model '98 Mauser action. This action and rifle was taking the world by storm, and it seemed that anyone who desired to advance himself in the eyes of his peers had to have one of these rifles; even the British army was in the process of trying to dump its Lee-Enfield .303 and adopt a Mauserderivative, along with most of the rest of the world. That they didn't actually manage to loose the Lee-Enfield for another 40 odd years is another story entirely. Suffice to say that a Mauser '98 sporter was the absolute sine qua non of the up-to-the-minute sporting gent, and here it was in a calibre bigger, better and more powerful than the .303. This was the objective all along, of course the .303 with its jacketed bullets and smokeless powder was an absolute revelation compared to black powder and lead bullets, but it quickly became evident that the old .303 was somewhat lacking in some respects, particularly against the heavier soft-skinned species. Furthermore, its rimmed case was an absolute pain in the nether regions when it came to reliable feeding in the later Mauser actions. Well, here was the answer, and the sportsmen of the day adopted it en masse.

The .318 uses a cartridge very similar (in fact, almost identical to) the American .30-06, and in fact it is quite feasible to make .318 cases from .30-06brass. The bullet is of considerably greater frontal area, however, and of a very useful greater weight. Actual bullet diameter is a somewhat confusing .330”, rather than .318 as the title suggests. This comes of the old British habit of commonly (but by no means universally) naming the cartridge by bore rather than groove diameter. The most common bullet weight was 250 grains at a listed speed of 2400 fps, which was by far the most effective and useful combination. A lightweight 180 grainer was offered at an alleged 2700 fps, but proved almost invariably to be a disappointment against all but the lighter species of game. Most of the British gunmakers of that era brought out lightweight bullets at high speed for their bolt-action rifles, so do not think that the Americans alone are guilty of a desire for velocity at all costs! My advice is to stick to the heavier bullet weight; it is more generally useful in Africa, has greater sectional density and most rifles will be sighted for it anyhow.

As stated, the .318 quickly becameimmensely popular in Africa. The 250 grain soft nosed bullets proved extremely effective and penetrative on game, while the solids if properly placed could down an elephant with a brain shot. W. D. M. ('Karamojo') Bell, one of the greatest of the old ivory hunters, used the .318 extensively. Indeed, from my readings, it seems as though he used the .318 at least as much (if not more) than the Rigby 7mm/.275 that he is most famed for using. HOWEVER justbecause Bell shot thousands of elephant with the .318 (and calibres like it), and lived to die of old age, does NOT make the .318 an elephant gun! This was a partial explanation for the eventual downfall of the .318. It became very popular extremely quickly, and is certainly one of those well balanced cartridges that performs out of all proportion to its size and paper ballistics. It was so effective that hunters started to use it against large, thick-skinned, dangerous game animals for which it was never intended. Well placed it would do the trick, but it was found wanting when things went wrong and a charge had to be stopped. Westley Richards themselves would tell you that the .318 was not designed for such stunts; that is what they designed their .425 for, and they would happily sell you one for hunting the big stuff that bit back. Hunters still used their .318's for dangerous game, though, and continued to be knocked about accordingly at times. A certain backlash was inevitable, but the .318 was still so splendidly effective against soft- skinned game that the process was more of a placing of things into perspective. Good as the .318 was, it became recognised that it did in fact have limitations after all, and that one would be well advised to take at least a .375 against the more malevolent species.

Part of the reputation for effectiveness of the .318 was unquestionably due to its being available with some of the bestbullets of the era. Being a Westley Richards calibre, the .318 could be had with soft capped bullets for expansion combined with deep penetration or the LT capped for maximum violent expansion with more limited penetration. Both bullet styles were exclusive to Westley Richards, and were certainly the premium soft noses of their day. I have only heard of one complaint regarding the .318 soft nosed bullets, and that was by a hunter who turned out to be using the light, speedy 180 grainers. He had heard so much about the awesome penetration of the .318, and couldn't understand why he wasn't achieving the same! One other potential problem; both the Westley Richards capped soft point designs superficially resembled solids, and if a shooter who wasn't in the know used a capped soft thinking it was a solid, then disappointment was sure to result.

Rifles chambered for the .318 were, of course, mainly made by Westley Richards on the Mauser action, but this was by no means universal. I have seen a few built upon modified Enfield P-14 actions, or more likely the outwardly identical American P-17. It would be a great deal easier to achieve satisfactory fit and feed for the .318 in an American .30-06 action than the British .303! Although the .318 is normally regarded as a proprietary cartridge (that is, normally only offered by the firm that introduced it), the .318 achieved such popularity that I would regard it as semi-proprietary at best. Mauser offered their 'A' grade rifle in .318 calibre, I once owned a Mauser actioned .318 sporter built by Greener, and recently examined a delightful little take-down .318 rifle by Thomas Bland (called 'The Compactum')! I have heard of a double rifle in .318 calibre (by Holland & Holland, no less) and while I have never seen one, I am certain that there must have been single shot rifles chambered for the .318 (rimless cartridge notwithstanding). There is no doubt that in the sporting fields of Africa during the 1920's and 1930's, a .318 was de rigueur for the knowledgeable hunter. It could be had in standard or take-down configuration from Westley Richards, with standard barrel lengths tending to be on the long side. Most oddly, a lot of .318's from Westley Richards had Metford style rifling. This of course led to worn and eroded bores after a lot of firing with Cordite ammunition. However, when peering down the bore of a .318, don't immediately write it off as irretrievably worn Metford rifling appears shallow and washed out in comparison to conventional lands and grooves, and it may shoot just fine. The .318's main competitor was the .333 Jeffries, also built on the Mauser action and firing a phenomenally long 300 grain bullet at a velocity of 2200 fps. This bullet gained an excellent reputation, and I have heard and read much concerning the popularity of this calibre in Africa. However, while I have examined a great many old .318 rifles, I have yet to even see a .333! It is my considered opinion that .318 rifles outnumbered .333's by a considerable margin in southern Africa.

With all the plaudits and popularity, it seemed that the .318's star would never set. However, World War Two intervened. Afterwards, it would take some years for the British gunmakers to resume sporting rifle manufacture. When they did, it was to find that the hunting fields of the world were now mainly the preserve of the American sportsman. These new nimrods, not unnaturally, wanted American rifles and calibres, and few of them had even heard of the .318. Winchester countered with their excellent .338 Magnum, which is somewhat more powerful than the .318 (which was all to the good as far as the American market went), and all this served to drive the .318 into rapid obscurity. A further clue as to the .318's demise can be gathered by a quick perusal of a 1954 Gun Digest. Westley Richards rifles are catalogued therein, available in various British calibres (including the .318) at a listed price of $400. No doubt it would have to be specially ordered, with the requisite waiting period to consider. In the same publication, however, is the adored Winchester Model 70 in a variety of American calibres, for a mere $120! Even a Super Grade Model '70 with selected walnut stock was only $195.45. Furthermore, .30-06 ammunition was half the price of .318, and a lot more available too. The old British gunmakers, without mass production and with a minimal domestic market, couldn't compete with the American makers as far as cost went. Furthermore, the British rifles were not what the American sportsman wanted at the time. The Brit rifles were hard to 'scope, and telescopic sights were in. Lightweight spitzer bullets at sizzling velocities were gaining popularity, and the English offerings with heavy, round-nosed bullets at moderate speed were out. Eventually Kynoch stopped production of virtually all the old British sporting rifle rounds, and that appeared to be the end of the .318.

Not quite, though. Ironically enough, it was the rifle-conscious Americans who led the revival, and more power to them. Tiring of the magnum craze and the glitzy rifles that went with it, the American sportsman became enamoured of classic cartridges and rifles. The effectiveness of heavy bullets at moderate speed was also re- discovered, and this all coincided with an old-time African hunting revival. Pre-war British rifles found themselves back in style again. A .318 became very much the thing to have, and a fair number of them had ended up in America over the years. Those which had escaped re-barreling were eagerly snapped up, and the Americans, being innovative as well as inveterate reloaders, did not long want for ammunition. Cases could be formed from readily available .30-06 brass, and makers of reloading dies would make whatever one wanted, but bullets continued to be a vexation. The smaller makers of custom bullets would oblige, of course, and .338 bullets could be swaged or ground to size, but the manufacturer who saved the day was Woodleigh of Australia. With impeccable timing, Woodleigh offered a whole range of bullets for a great many of the older British sporting rifles, including the .318. Furthermore, these bullets were of premium quality, taking advantage of all the benefits of modern technology. Bertrams, also of Australia, produce a similar line of high quality, properly headstamped brass cases for obsolete firearms again, included in the line up is the .318. The recently resuscitated line of Kynoch ammunition includes the .318 as well as most of the other old British sporting calibres, and, best of all, perusal of a recent catalogue showed that .318 rifles are once more available from Westley Richards! This splendid old calibre appears to be going from strength to strength, which just goes to prove that while shooting attitudes and fashions change, calibres remain as effective as they always were.
Good article, enjoyed reading it. Could you please do one on the .333 Jeffery, one of the .404J's excellent wildcats.
 

Cervus elaphus

AH fanatic
Joined
Feb 16, 2021
Messages
789
Reaction score
1,481
Location
Australia
Media
2
Hunted
New Zealand. SA on bucket list
My two 318's have yet to go as well. Would bring one this summer to Tanzania, but want to play with the Rigby .275 with @spike.t . Both have at least taken whitetail and nilgai.

Westley Richards take down with period Griffin & Howe side mount.

Westley Richards 318 Express Take Down


Post WWI Cogswell & Harrison on a P-14 action
WR 318 Cogswell & Harrison


Though the C&H might also be a lot of fun ............ :unsure:
Love that P14 rifle !
 

Rule 303

AH fanatic
Joined
Oct 6, 2015
Messages
840
Reaction score
922
Location
Brisbane
Media
6
Hunted
Australia, New Zealand, Zimbabwe & Namibia
@CAustin
Mate come out to Australia and you will see plenty of worn out barrels. Roo shooters of yore would wear out a sako vixen 222 rem barrel a year. Naturally sako wouldn't believe this so sent a rep to check it out. Result was sako sold new barrels to Australia.
I have personally worn out a Remington 788 22/250 barrel hunting foxes, rabbits and pigs as well as a 303 barrel. When you have access to free 303 ammo it is easily done. I don't know how much 303 ammo is in a 200 litre drum but by the time it's gone your barrel isn't looking to good.
Bob
Speaking of usage. I am just back from out west helping a Pro Shooter. Tikka T3 in 223Rem, nearly 14,000 through it and it is still shooting. Less than a years work.
 

Bob Nelson 35Whelen

AH ambassador
Joined
Oct 28, 2018
Messages
5,573
Reaction score
10,741
Location
Wyong new south Wales Australia
Media
13
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
SSAA
Hunted
Australia
Speaking of usage. I am just back from out west helping a Pro Shooter. Tikka T3 in 223Rem, nearly 14,000 through it and it is still shooting. Less than a years work.
@Rule 303
I think in Australia we have a bad habit of wearing out barrels but what the he'll a m as nd grain to earn a living or have fun.
Bob
 

spike.t

Sponsor
Since 2013
AH ambassador
Joined
Sep 12, 2010
Messages
11,116
Reaction score
17,296
Website
www.takerireservezambia.com
Media
348
Articles
12
Hunting reports
Africa
3
Member of
sci int, basc,wpaz
Hunted
zambia, tanzania, zimbabwe,Mozambique ,hungary, france, england
My two 318's have yet to go as well. Would bring one this summer to Tanzania, but want to play with the Rigby .275 with @spike.t . Both have at least taken whitetail and nilgai.

Westley Richards take down with period Griffin & Howe side mount.

Westley Richards 318 Express Take Down


Post WWI Cogswell & Harrison on a P-14 action
WR 318 Cogswell & Harrison


Though the C&H might also be a lot of fun ............ :unsure:

Bring the 275 and a 318......only one gun case :E Shrug: :D Beers:
 

Forum statistics

Threads
39,828
Messages
776,211
Members
72,681
Latest member
jun88vn
 

 

 

Latest profile posts

Bearhunter46 wrote on Philip Glass's profile.
Philip, do you still have the 416 for sale?
NTH wrote on Rick HOlbert's profile.
Nice “meeting” you Rick. I made my first trip to S. Africa this year through Kuche Safaris. We had an incredible time. What outfitter do you use? Neal
LIFE-FORM TAXIDERMY World Leader In Superior Taxidermy Since 1981

taxidermy-south-africa.jpg
Global Rescue - Worldwide Emergency Evacuation & Field Rescue, Anytime Anywhere

global-rescue.jpg
Special 10% Off On Taxidermy For AfricaHunting Members 2021

taxidermy-in-texas.jpg
 
Top