What To Take In The Field

Discussion in 'Hunting Equipment, Gear & Optics' started by Aaron Nietfeld, Mar 30, 2015.

  1. Velo Dog

    Velo Dog AH ENABLER GOLD SUPPORTER SILVER SUPPORTER AH Legend

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    Thanks, but I have several old film canisters in reserve (I loose small things sometimes).
    But, Glucometer stick canister is a great idea that I had not thought of.
    I'm with you on the small pocket knife - I have carried one since childhood and even though I never seem to find anything to cut in Africa, except the occasional apple or biltong stick, I likely will always have a small blade on me, no matter what continent or archipelago I'm visiting.
    Regarding the eyewear, The Almighty has blessed me hugely with above average eyesight and I should take better care of it than I sometimes do.
    But, I guess I'm just a greasy bohunk, because when marching over hill and dale with a rifle, I usually sweat enough to make glasses a slippery mess on my face so, I never wear them (sun glasses) unless riding in a car or on a mule, horse, etc.
    I have seen spitting cobras in Namibia but they didn't spit at me because I kept a long distance away.
    Otherwise for poking at them with a spoon or some such, glasses might be worth while.
     

  2. elmerfudd555

    elmerfudd555 AH Senior Member

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    I can only add one item to the lists here.....your eyes get real dry riding in the open air of a typical safari rig. Kiss of death if it's sandy and you wear contacts. Definitely have some rewetting drops with you. And a spare set of contacts as well. Made my life so much more comfortable over there when we were miles from camp.
     

  3. gutterdoc

    gutterdoc AH Veteran

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    I go to the vet and get some assorted sizes of prescription bottles. They are blank and come in big, small, tall, fat, skinny. The tops usually say for animal use only which doesn't draw a lot of prying eyes. I put a pre-soaked patches in one and dry patches in another. One is a small first aid kit. The options are endless. I also always pack a few of those big diaper pins. They can used for anything!
     

  4. spike.t

    spike.t AH ENABLER SPONSOR Since 2013 AH Ambassador

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    aaron the most you need is what royal has listed below, and i doubt if the knife would ever be used unless its to cut up an orange or similar........i wish people would stop stressing out about what gizmo/gadget etc etc, socks , shirt ;) they worry they might need, when at the end of the day they will never even remember they have them .........

     
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  5. Royal27

    Royal27 AH ENABLER AH Ambassador

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    That was my experience for sure!!!!
     

  6. Global Rescue

    Global Rescue SPONSOR Since 2012 AH Fanatic

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    [​IMG]

    Packing for the Outdoors - Tips from Global Rescue
    by Drew Pache

    Drew Pache is a Manager in Global Rescue’s Security Operations Department. Prior to joining the Global Rescue, he spent 21 years as an officer in the U.S. Army Special Forces.

    B
    ecause people head outdoors for many different reasons and encounter different environments during different seasons, it is challenging to compile a “master list” to cover all outdoor activities. However, in my more than two decades in the military where I worked and lived in everything from Arctic cold to desert heat, there are some items that I found it hard to live without. The right equipment on the trail will not only keep you alive; it will also keep you comfortable and allow greater enjoyment of your trip, whatever your activity of choice may be.

    In general, I divide my gear into three piles, suitable for 1) a larger backpack 2) a smaller day pack, or 3) to be either worn or kept in my pockets.

    Larger backpack

    These items are for living and comfort and include the following:

    --Tent/bivy cover
    --Sleeping bag
    --Sleeping pad
    --Mosquito net
    --Extra clothing
    --Stove/cooking gear
    --Food/water
    --Towel
    --Hatchet

    The shelter, sleeping bag, and extra clothing are all dictated by the climate and location, as is the necessity of a mosquito net. I recommend waterproof bags to keep items dry. Food is obviously a necessity, but the type and the elaborateness of its preparation are completely up to you. I am pretty spartan about food on the trail, and literally have spent months eating cold food, even when hot chow was available. However, friends of mine have elevated back country cooking to an art form and can create a gourmet meal from the most meager ingredients. Needless to say, their skills didn’t hurt their popularity.

    [​IMG]

    Day pack

    The second category of gear goes in the day pack. When camping or hunting, I usually hike in under the full load. Once camp is set, I venture out on shorter trips from there. The load is much lighter but you still need to have the basics on hand in case you get into trouble (or trouble finds you).

    Items for the small pack:

    --Water/snacks
    --Warming layer
    --GPS w/ extra (rechargeable) batteries
    --Solar charger
    --First aid kit
    --Head lamp
    --Socks
    --Space blanket
    --Foam pad (for sitting in cold, snowy conditions)
    --Fire-starting gear
    --Signal mirror
    --Sat phone / texting device (for very remote locations)

    The solar charger, a recent addition to my kit, can charge my cell phone, GPS, headlamp and anything else that can be powered with rechargeable batteries. You can even clip it onto your pack and it will charge as you hike. Earlier on the Global Rescue blog, we featured a blog post on the contents of a good first aid kit. Even though this kit is light and packs smaller than you’d think, it will cover you through a variety of misadventures,

    To be worn/ in pockets

    These are the items I have on me at all times:

    --Map of the area and a decent compass

    GPS devices are one of the miracles of the modern world, but they can break or run out of batteries at the most inopportune times. It is also easier to terrain-associate with a map than with GPS. I definitely get a better feel for the lay of the land when I can see it on paper.

    --Folding knife or multi-tool
    --Signal mirror
    --Cordage

    Parachute cord is great because in a pinch it can be taken apart, or “gutted,” and the smaller strings inside the outer covering can be used individually. They don’t look like much but they are really strong!

    --A pair of light but durable gloves

    Hard experience has also taught me to protect my hands out there, regardless of the temperature. This prevents the painful scrapes and punctures that are inevitable when traveling in the back country.

    --Some type of eye protection

    This is important for more than just protection from the sun’s glare. Low branches can pose a nasty hazard, especially when moving in the woods after dark. An eye injury in the backcountry can be disabling and will virtually guarantee a trip to the local ER (if one is available).

    The gear above is what I bring on most trips. It does not have to be fancy or high tech and generally the simplest solutions are the best.

    We look forward to hearing what you never leave home without!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 1, 2016
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  7. Imbambala

    Imbambala AH Member

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    Burt the turtle hit the nail on the head with “The less you carry the better.” Lugging around extra unnecessary equipment is both noisy and irritating. On a guided hunt I would carry the following:

    a. Leatherman,

    b. Rifle,

    c. Ammo,

    d. Hat,

    e. Camera,

    f. Watch,

    g. Toilet paper.

    As I am a local I hunt unguided so I usually carry the following:

    a. Leatherman,

    b. Rifle,

    c. Ammo,

    d. Hat,

    e. Watch,

    f. Camera,

    g. Toilet paper,

    h. Camelback,

    i. Skinning Knife,

    j. Two way radio – or cell phone,

    k. Energy Bar & Biltong,

    l. Range finder.

    m. Ballistol, Boresnake, and toothbrush,

    n. Shooting sticks (I let the tracker carry these for me).

    Hope this helps!
     
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  8. Pheroze

    Pheroze AH ENABLER AH Legend

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    I plan on taking my GPS. Even if I don't need it, it will be cool to upload where we have been.
     

  9. BRICKBURN

    BRICKBURN AH ENABLER SUPER MODERATOR CONTRIBUTOR LIFETIME TITANIUM BENEFACTOR AH Ambassador

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    After reading this I see lots of great ideas and advice.

    Really depends on the hunt:
    Ranch or back country, Walking 30KM Elephant Hunt or Bakkie tour.
    Temperature; is it going to be hot (to you)
    Terrain; flats, bush, mountains.

    On my carcass I usually have:
    Water, Minimum a bottle or a camelback. I need lots.
    Shell carrier on my belt. 10 extras.
    Leatherman
    GPS
    Mobile Phone
    Gum
    Chapstick

    Headlamp
    Binos on a shoulder harness.
    Rangefinder
    Camera

    The bold items are always with me.
     
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  10. rnovi

    rnovi AH Enthusiast

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    I've only been to Africa twice and those were for Plainsgame. In general, the game is to drive around until you see something to stalk and hunt. Bail out of the Bakkie and get on a 45 minute to 2 hour stalk over 3-5 miles. At most. Most stalks were in the mile, mile and a half range.

    I did a small backpack - that lasted a half a day. I then left it in the Bakkie for the rest of the trip. I tried a small fanny pack - even went so far as to add shell loops to the belt. That made it one day.

    I've found that going as light as possible works for me. My load out looks like this:

    Merkel K1 in 7mm RMag - 6.5# scoped with a FX3 6x42 LR reticle.
    One round in the chamber. One more round in my right pocket.
    Five rounds on a belt slide.
    Chapstick and a small bottle of eye drops in my left pocket.
    Cannon S90 camera in a pouch on the back belt.
    Zeiss 10x32 Victory bino's cross slung over the right shoulder, on the left hip.
    Small swiss army knife with tweezers.
    And a hat. Take your pick, I like a nice broad brimmed hat.

    The bakkie stops, I slug down a bottle of water and we roll. If I need it and know it's going to be a long walk I'll throw another bottle of water in my left back pocket. I have a small mini-bungie on my belt that I can loop around the mouth of the bottle to keep it from flying out.

    That's it.

    What I've discovered is that the bakkie is never really that far away for anything heavy. The Bakkie has a full first aid kit, water, food, etc.

    Is it a different game hunting elephant and buff? Probably. But I haven't done that yet.

    Regardless, I'm of the lighter is better mentality. Less is more.
     
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  11. siml

    siml AH ENABLER AH Legend

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    @James.Grage , you nailed it!!! Any PH thats doesn't carry shit paper, needs a good slap!!
     
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  12. Longwalker

    Longwalker AH Enthusiast

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    I would not ever hunt with a rifle and not carry binoculars. It's hunting, after all, not just going for a ride and being told what to shoot!
     
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  13. JimP

    JimP AH Elite

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    Any person that goes out into the wild unprepared just doesn't belong there. Rocks are rough and some leaves will leave you with a very bad case of the itches.

    I always pack my own and don't depend on others for my necessaries.
     
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  14. FairChase

    FairChase AH Senior Member

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    All great ideas with useful gear. What and how much to carry is a personal choice and depends on each situation; climate, terrain, PH, experience level, etc.

    Most list some sort of a First Aid Kit (FAK) which is a good thing. But one thing that I would urge others to consider is a Trauma Pak with QuikClot. Having a few band-aids for small cuts and abrasions is fine, but if a severe traumatic injury occurred, this could easily save a life.

    What I like about his product other than its efficacy, is that it is relatively small, lightweight, packaged for the field and easy to use. They even have a training video.

    As a Navy FMF Corpsman, I found that having quick access to even basic medical supplies can make a difference. Since those days, I have always kept a FAK with me wherever I have gone; in my vehicles, at my home and certainly with me on any back country expedition.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2015

  15. Mekaniks

    Mekaniks GOLD SUPPORTER AH Elite

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    I agree. Quick Clot comes in small, light weight, easy to use packages that will fit in just about any first aid kit. All my kits (travel, car, house, backpacking, have a package in them. I have a friend that cut himself badly on the inner thigh while field dressing a deer in a remote part of Alaska and used quick clot sponge to stop the bleeding until he got to the hospital and they stitched him up.

    The only caution is for folks with seafood allergy, to make sure they get the appropriate "shell fish free" version (iodine free) And if using quick clot on someone else, verify that they don't have a seafood allergy before using. Don't want to make a bad day worse...
     
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  16. FairChase

    FairChase AH Senior Member

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    Great point about the seafood/iodine allergy contraindication! Thanx!
     

  17. Mekaniks

    Mekaniks GOLD SUPPORTER AH Elite

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    I went through all my kits today and none of my quick clot contains shell fish iodine. I did a quick research online and it looks like they are not using it at all. So I guess it's All good...
     
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  18. Slugs Away

    Slugs Away AH Veteran

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    Water in a ss vessel
    Trauma first aid kit
    Fire lighter
    Flashlight
    Map compass
    Radio
    knife

    and most importantly extra soft toilet paper, because there is a shortage of moss in many parts of Africa.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2016

  19. Witold Krzyżanowski

    Witold Krzyżanowski AH ENABLER AH Legend

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    I think that most important is luck hunting, rifle and cartridges.
    Witold
     
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  20. Rule 303

    Rule 303 AH Fanatic

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    I am a bit different to some in that my day pack is always with me when away from the truck, that is what it is for. Also when in the bush I always have a good 4" fixed blade knife. Day pack will have a 3lt camel back in it, along with basic first aid, unfortunately we can not get quick clot in Australia. Least I have not seen it, is it known by any other name? Also in the pack are camera, head light and small but powerful hand held torch, spare batteries and any clothing/insect repellent/survival gear the climate and location may require and a second soft brimmed hat.

    On me will be the rifle, binos, ammo, compass, map -if I have one of the area.

    When I hunted in Zim it was a late season hunt and fairly warm. The PH and trackers carried a lot of water but I still carried the camel back, never know what can happen. My PH had me assess many animals to see if they were up to my expectations, hard to do that without binos, especially with eye sight that is on the wrong side of 55.
     

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