Tsavo

Pondoro

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A Mau Mau story mused me...the brits deployed SAS troops and among other things they filled up .303 ammo with explosive, set the bullet back and casually throved them along bush roads..
 

Dinosaur

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G
Love the story about your mother and Aagard.

If you wanted to start a thread dealing with the war in Kenya/Mau Mau I don't think you would have any problems from Jerome @AfricaHunting.com or @BRICKBURN . In fact I think they would welcome the thread as would I. If they were concerned they will comment to us now.

Interesting that your grandparents are from Thika. As a kid I remember being with my family looking at the Thika Falls. I had never seen Niagara Falls at the time and I remember my father saying that Thika is a scaled down version of Niagara.

With grandparents from Thika, have you ever read "The Flame Trees of Thika"? Did your grandparents know the Huxley's.

Enjoying your history. Thanks.

G'day Foxi,

You are pretty convincing, and maybe I might make another topic, but I have only been told about a few incidents, I am guessing there are other members on this site who may have experienced the real events, maybe even ex Mau Maus could be on the site too, and I reckon if they wrote a book on their side of the Emergency it would make a great movie. Robert Ruark pretty much summed up the true feelings of the settlers in his books. My father actually felt sorry for them as the huge majority of Mau Mau members are human like us, but they were forced to become terrorists, as in death to all your family, and yourself unless you swear on the oath. It was the leaders who were the non-human evil pieces of sadistic destruction, evil evil witch doctors more or less. Mind you, Mugabe was just as bad.

By the way your earlier reply about Pressure Lanterns brought back memories to me too. I thought it was only me who had troubles with them. When I first started using, I had no problems, but when mantles started breaking, and the whole thing catching fire, can get you a bit wary of using them. But boy, did they put out the brightest of lights. :)

As for the 'Flame Trees of Thika', I recall viewing the series on ABC TV with Hayley Mills as one of the main characters, it was really enjoyable. I haven't read the book, nor have heard my family relating to knowing them. Maybe it just never came up, but thank you for asking though.

Mum mentioned that one of her friends was filmed jumping off Thika Falls, as a stunt for a Tarzan movie, I don't know his name, nor the actual movie. The only Tarzan film that I know of that has a Tarzan jumping off a waterfall was of the Ron Ely Tarzan TV Series. Now that we have the internet, perhaps we can try to match the scenery with Thika Falls ???

My mother had a lot of crazy African cowboy friends, there were three brothers who used to live up the road at Thika. Every christmas they would save up and purchase a Beetle, then all jump in and go flat out across their farm at top speed to see how many times that could roll the beetles, absolute nutcases. I have been in car crashes and can tell you that rolling and cart-wheeling four wheel drives absolutely hurts, like real bad, and that's when you are strapped in with a decent seat belt. :(

Regards

Rob
 

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Dinosaur

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I didn't know a movie about a coke bottle cold be so hilarious. Loved the part where the Winchester the Landry up a tree.
It should be mandatory viewing during lockdown for AH members
Bob

G'day Bob,

I totally agree, Dad loved the Land Rover bit, with the rock behind the wheel as a hand brake, and as for Rhinos just charging out of nowhere, that was extremely common at Tsavo. I haven't driven a Land Rover but have owned a lot of Toyota Land cruiser Short Wheel Base four wheel Drives, FJ40's and BJ40's and never trusted their handbrakes, especially when parking on a steep four wheel drive track.

The hand brake actually ran off the back of the transfer case, from a mini brake drum, but unlike the Nissan Patrols, there was no oil overflow hole at the bottom of the drum housing, if you had a transfer case oil leak. It was a common fault with the transfer cases leaking so the brake drum always had slippery oil on it's surface, you could never rely on the hand brake.

If facing upward up a steep slope, I would always try to locate a big enough tree to lean the rear of my car on, as an extra precaution, but trees and rocks would be better than nothing, and there is nothing as bad as trying to start you car on a steep gradient, as you have to push your clutch in to start the 4x4 and ride your foot brake together with the throttle. Yep a tree behind you gives a lot more comfort.

Hey, there is actually one movie that actually beats the Gods Must Be Crazy, that is "Gods must be Crazy 2", it is totally hilarious, in a different way, and to top it off has a stunning actress, highly recommended.

Regards

Rob
 

Dinosaur

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Rob,

I really enjoy your family stories. You mentioning the pressure lantern brought back a memory of getting a brand new Coleman pressure lantern that we would use while camping/hunting. The roads were rough on the mantels and it always seemed like we were trying to get broken ones to light properly. We too would always move the lantern away from the tent prior to retiring for the night to keep the dudu (insects) out.

Bonnets and boots on VW bugs were always confusing for me as a kid. We had one at a point in time.

Thinking back regarding the map, either Michelin or Shell used to make maps of East Africa that looked much like the map you posted. I always enjoyed them as they were more interactive.

Thanks for sharing your memories!


Hey wheels, I have made a blunder in my previous comment to Foxi, as it was you who I was responding to regarding your earlier comment on Pressure Lanterns sorry :sick: I appear to have 'Old Timers Disease'. ;)

Rob
 

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During my Father's survey expeditions in Tsavo/Voi area, he told me how his african helpers would always carry round a large cooking pot,. Upon arriving at their destinations they would heave the pot out of the back of the Land Rover, start a fire, and place the pot on it for dinner. Dad didn't really join them with their meal, as the pot was never washed, was always full, and always being topped up with anything living that the Africans came across. When forcing their way through the thorn bush country the fellas in the back would catch birds, huge spiders, bugs, locusts, absolutely anything within their reach, and chuck it instantly in the pot. No gutting, skinning , nor plucking of birds. Everything was whole. They would just stew it all up and really enjoy the meal. It was probably still a lot more healthier than Mc Donalds, hey. :ROFLMAO:

Regards
Rob
 

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I would like to see that museum and Patterson's Lions. It's just a movie that I will watch again
 

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G'day Duncan

Thank you for your kind response, I feel the same way as you, as when my father past away I was unable to attend his funeral and hence my sisters wrote the speech for the funeral, but I couldn't believe that my 3 sisters mentioned nothing, nor had aby interest in what my parent's history was. It was really sad, as I should have been asked for some input. I have discovered that my nieces and nephews too have no interest in the past, so I have decided to tell some of my familie's stories, otherwise they will be totally lost.

Duncan, your father must have been a brave man serving in the police force during that 'Emergency', my great uncle was serving too, up near Thika way. I still have a few of his old letters to my Grandfather during the period, which are pretty interesting. When my mum's parents moved to Thika from Australia after the war, the Emergency was starting to wind down, but they like many other settlers, all have their own stories of the so-called freedom fighters.

It was a bit like the wild west, all the farmers carried firearms, even at the dinner table. maybe I will bring that subject up under a different topic under other Conversations. Sadly I will need to be politically correct though, so I may not be able to put much in.

My father's parents lived at Karen, and when checking Google Earth Images it appears that their house is no longer there, it is now a Primate Research Centre, which is funny as my friends call me 'Mzuri' which was the name of the gorilla at the local zoo. I thought it was amusing.

Sad to hear that your father left his Obendorf 9.3 x 62 Mauser behind, they are a beautiful rifle and a great calibre. My father left all his rifles at the police post when he left Kenya too, including an old .450/400 3/4 inch double rifle (with hammers ), he said it was an oddball brand like Webley, or something like that.

Perhaps you can note some of your fathers stories too.

Nice to meet you

Regards

Rob
 

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I will look sometime
 

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Tsavo is back up to about 15,000 + elephants. Frankly the 35,000 back in the 70’s was too many. I would say 15,000 to 20,000 is about the right number in my opinion.
 

Safari1

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Tsavo is back up to about 15,000 + elephants. Frankly the 35,000 back in the 70’s was too many. I would say 15,000 to 20,000 is about the right number in my opinion.

Look at the last photo on page 8. That photo was taken in August 2020 and that breeding herd of 43 has no less than 11 calves.
 

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