Tsavo

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I have a great interest in Tsavo having read Patterson and several other accounts of the lions. I’d love to see the area and any remnants of the bridge. As I seriously doubt that will ever come to fruition I will have to vicariously visit by reading this thread. Thanks Kouprey, Foxi and Dinosaur for sharing.
A funny thing happened a few years ago while visiting the Field Museum in Chicago and viewing the mounted lions. I was telling my wife the story and about thirty people gathered around to listen and a several started asking me questions about it. I guess if I ever decide to come out of retirement, I could move to Chicago and get a job as a docent.
 

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"it was extremely dangerous during that period as the Somali Shifta had been not only slaughtering elephants at Tsavo, but had been causing havoc by firing on passers by using the Nairobi/Mombasa Road, which is the main road through Tsavo. There was a lot of hush hush going on during that year, raids from the shifta, corrupt Tanzanian soldiers crossing the border and killing a bus load of american tourists was kept quiet too. Only the local Kenyans knew about it."



Boko Haram, Shiftas and Shabab militia, Joseph Cony,this bastard and his LRA.Chaos in Sudan and criminal gangs we have never heared of it.
Land areas larg than Europe that are no longer safe to travel, all of which the colonial powers would never have tolerated.
But in the history and in the political discuss,they are still the exploiting devils..................
 

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I have been to Tsavo but it was many years ago. We didn't spend any time looking for any of the locations mentioned in Patterson's book. It would be interesting to find the spots now.

My memories of Tsavo is that it was not overly impressive. The land was fairly flat, thorn scrub ran right up to the road, it was scorching hot during the day and there was a dearth of animals to be found. As a NP it worked great for the elephants, but for game viewing it was poor compared to most NP's at the time.

@Dinosaur I absolutely love your father's photos. Thanks for sharing them with us. Did your father draw the map showing Tsavo/Kilimanjaro? I love looking at that map. One thing I find interesting is the map shows Kilimanjaro at 19,563' , now it is 19,341'. I would doubt that cartographers would be so far off only 60 years ago and wonder if much of the difference is glacier melt.

I also see you have hunted Kenya. Was this prior to the 1978 shutdown on mammals or have you hunted birds more recently. It is my understanding they have shut bird hunting down as of 5 or so years ago. We would love to see your Kenya hunting photos as well.



G'day Wheels

You are a luckier man having experienced Tsavo during the day, I envy you. I was only a tot when my father used to take my elder sister and I to the Tsavo area, but being that young I couldn't remember anything. My father recalled how one day they were having a picnic near the Tsavo river, when my sister who was only a year older than me, unexpectedly took off around the thorn bushes which were only a few feet away. Well if you know kids, they are just so quick, and unless they are on a leash, they can be unstoppable.


As expected my father tore after her and gasped in fear, as my sister ran right up to a huge cobra which rose right up over her head with hood erected. The only thing that stopped it striking was that it had a huge frog in its mouth, what a relief for my parents, and one less life to my sister.


He had other stories on how he was crawling under/through the thorn bushes when he discovered that there were 4 x unusual coloured and shaped tree trunks surrounding him. Until he heard a rumbling noise above him, where he took off as he realised that he was under an elephant, the elephant taking off in the other direction.


The scrub was so thick along the river, as he also trod on an unseen crocodile, and thankfully my father was quicker off the mark. He also spoke of these strange spiders that used to approach his camp stretcher after dark, he called them sun spiders. He reckons they weren't exactly a spider, as they had huge fangs and looked almost scorpion like without the tail and pincers. He used to feed them the insects which flew to the nearby pressure lanterns, he said that the spiders would almost eat out of his hand, as they were pretty friendly. I discovered later that these spiders are similar to the camel spiders found up north.


There was also a huge red spitting cobra which would pass regularly through the camp, and once again, it posed no threat, and of course puff adders and scorpions. One of his words of advice was always to shake your boots when getting up in the morning, and never to put your camp lighting anywhere near your bed, as you will get all manor of bugs landing on your cot. Sausage flies, moths etcetera.


Before I was born, my father would be out camping with mum, and on one trip they were leaving Tsavo after dark, in an oil cooled Volkswagon Beetle. My mother said that they had to lock their car brakes up to a screeching halt on the sandy/dusty track as a huge mane-less male lion ambled across the road in front of them as though he didn't have a care in the world. I was told by both of my parents that the Lion's shoulder was higher than the bonnet (boot actually) of the VW, and as soon as the lion disappeared off the road into the darkness, my father, the lunatic, jumped out of the VW and went to measure the Lions footprints, as you may guess my mother was in hysterics telling him to get back into the car. The lion thankfully didn't return, and my mother said that the lions footprint was larger than his opened hand, fingers spread.


I was told these huge individual lions are Buffalo lions, they may pair up with other pride-less male lions to pull buffalo down using team work.


Wheels, the map that is uploaded above must have been an old park map, regrettably I do not think it is one of my fathers, as it looked as though it was cut out from a book, or a park map. It is still a good map to give people an idea of the areas in the vicinity of Tsavo.


As for my visit to Kenya, it was in the mid 1980's, and you are totally right hunting of Game animals was banned totally.


My uncle who still lives within Nairobi, up near Karen, at Langata has a lot of contacts and had a licence to hunt ducks up towards Thika way, on rice fields. Whether his licence was a game bird control licence, who knows ?? I do recall seeing water game bird hunts being advertised years ago, but I haven't seen any advertisement for a long time.


As for photos, I do wish that I took my camera, but didn't, which is sad. I did borrow my uncles video camera just to take some footage of his house, and a few chameleons that I caught in their garden, but that was it. Honestly, I am very photo shy, and sometimes get caught in photos by my mates, but those photos are Australia based.

Regards

Rob
 

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Here are a few more from Tsavo.

Rob

P1140360.JPG
P1140363.JPG
P1140365.JPG
 
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DuncanF

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Some more, with my mum and dad.

Rob

Hi Rob,

Thanks for your writings and pictures. Brings back memories!

I was born in Nakuru. My father was a policeman during the emergency.

Lived in Langata at one stage.

A time to remember and reminisce about unfortunately gone forever!

My father used an Obendorf Mauser in 9,3 x 62 which unfortunately was left behind when we had to leave.

Unfortunately have never been back.
 

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Hi Rob,

Thanks for your writings and pictures. Brings back memories!

I was born in Nakuru. My father was a policeman during the emergency.

Lived in Langata at one stage.

A time to remember and reminisce about unfortunately gone forever!

My father used an Obendorf Mauser in 9,3 x 62 which unfortunately was left behind when we had to leave.

Unfortunately have never been back.


G'day Duncan

Thank you for your kind response, I feel the same way as you, as when my father past away I was unable to attend his funeral and hence my sisters wrote the speech for the funeral, but I couldn't believe that my 3 sisters mentioned nothing, nor had aby interest in what my parent's history was. It was really sad, as I should have been asked for some input. I have discovered that my nieces and nephews too have no interest in the past, so I have decided to tell some of my familie's stories, otherwise they will be totally lost.

Duncan, your father must have been a brave man serving in the police force during that 'Emergency', my great uncle was serving too, up near Thika way. I still have a few of his old letters to my Grandfather during the period, which are pretty interesting. When my mum's parents moved to Thika from Australia after the war, the Emergency was starting to wind down, but they like many other settlers, all have their own stories of the so-called freedom fighters.

It was a bit like the wild west, all the farmers carried firearms, even at the dinner table. maybe I will bring that subject up under a different topic under other Conversations. Sadly I will need to be politically correct though, so I may not be able to put much in.

My father's parents lived at Karen, and when checking Google Earth Images it appears that their house is no longer there, it is now a Primate Research Centre, which is funny as my friends call me 'Mzuri' which was the name of the gorilla at the local zoo. I thought it was amusing.

Sad to hear that your father left his Obendorf 9.3 x 62 Mauser behind, they are a beautiful rifle and a great calibre. My father left all his rifles at the police post when he left Kenya too, including an old .450/400 3/4 inch double rifle (with hammers ), he said it was an oddball brand like Webley, or something like that.

Perhaps you can note some of your fathers stories too.

Nice to meet you

Regards

Rob
 

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Hi, does anyone want to talk about Tsavo.
I believe its a National Park now.
Ive watched the Ghost and the Darkness a dozen time. I read the man eaters of Tsavo written by Colonel John Patterson who is depicted in the screen play

I like the scenery and the story.

Has anyone been there, is there anything of the original railway bridge, siding, quarry, camps etc?


G'day CBH

These pics were on the net, old and new bridges.

Regards

Rob

Old Bridge with new bridge in background.png
Old Tsavo Bridge.png
 
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G'day Wheels

You are a luckier man having experienced Tsavo during the day, I envy you. I was only a tot when my father used to take my elder sister and I to the Tsavo area, but being that young I couldn't remember anything. My father recalled how one day they were having a picnic near the Tsavo river, when my sister who was only a year older than me, unexpectedly took off around the thorn bushes which were only a few feet away. Well if you know kids, they are just so quick, and unless they are on a leash, they can be unstoppable.


As expected my father tore after her and gasped in fear, as my sister ran right up to a huge cobra which rose right up over her head with hood erected. The only thing that stopped it striking was that it had a huge frog in its mouth, what a relief for my parents, and one less life to my sister.


He had other stories on how he was crawling under/through the thorn bushes when he discovered that there were 4 x unusual coloured and shaped tree trunks surrounding him. Until he heard a rumbling noise above him, where he took off as he realised that he was under an elephant, the elephant taking off in the other direction.


The scrub was so thick along the river, as he also trod on an unseen crocodile, and thankfully my father was quicker off the mark. He also spoke of these strange spiders that used to approach his camp stretcher after dark, he called them sun spiders. He reckons they weren't exactly a spider, as they had huge fangs and looked almost scorpion like without the tail and pincers. He used to feed them the insects which flew to the nearby pressure lanterns, he said that the spiders would almost eat out of his hand, as they were pretty friendly. I discovered later that these spiders are similar to the camel spiders found up north.


There was also a huge red spitting cobra which would pass regularly through the camp, and once again, it posed no threat, and of course puff adders and scorpions. One of his words of advice was always to shake your boots when getting up in the morning, and never to put your camp lighting anywhere near your bed, as you will get all manor of bugs landing on your cot. Sausage flies, moths etcetera.


Before I was born, my father would be out camping with mum, and on one trip they were leaving Tsavo after dark, in an oil cooled Volkswagon Beetle. My mother said that they had to lock their car brakes up to a screeching halt on the sandy/dusty track as a huge mane-less male lion ambled across the road in front of them as though he didn't have a care in the world. I was told by both of my parents that the Lion's shoulder was higher than the bonnet (boot actually) of the VW, and as soon as the lion disappeared off the road into the darkness, my father, the lunatic, jumped out of the VW and went to measure the Lions footprints, as you may guess my mother was in hysterics telling him to get back into the car. The lion thankfully didn't return, and my mother said that the lions footprint was larger than his opened hand, fingers spread.


I was told these huge individual lions are Buffalo lions, they may pair up with other pride-less male lions to pull buffalo down using team work.


Wheels, the map that is uploaded above must have been an old park map, regrettably I do not think it is one of my fathers, as it looked as though it was cut out from a book, or a park map. It is still a good map to give people an idea of the areas in the vicinity of Tsavo.


As for my visit to Kenya, it was in the mid 1980's, and you are totally right hunting of Game animals was banned totally.


My uncle who still lives within Nairobi, up near Karen, at Langata has a lot of contacts and had a licence to hunt ducks up towards Thika way, on rice fields. Whether his licence was a game bird control licence, who knows ?? I do recall seeing water game bird hunts being advertised years ago, but I haven't seen any advertisement for a long time.


As for photos, I do wish that I took my camera, but didn't, which is sad. I did borrow my uncles video camera just to take some footage of his house, and a few chameleons that I caught in their garden, but that was it. Honestly, I am very photo shy, and sometimes get caught in photos by my mates, but those photos are Australia based.

Regards

Rob

Rob,

I really enjoy your family stories. You mentioning the pressure lantern brought back a memory of getting a brand new Coleman pressure lantern that we would use while camping/hunting. The roads were rough on the mantels and it always seemed like we were trying to get broken ones to light properly. We too would always move the lantern away from the tent prior to retiring for the night to keep the dudu (insects) out.

Bonnets and boots on VW bugs were always confusing for me as a kid. We had one at a point in time.

Thinking back regarding the map, either Michelin or Shell used to make maps of East Africa that looked much like the map you posted. I always enjoyed them as they were more interactive.

Thanks for sharing your memories!
 

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G'day Duncan

Thank you for your kind response, I feel the same way as you, as when my father past away I was unable to attend his funeral and hence my sisters wrote the speech for the funeral, but I couldn't believe that my 3 sisters mentioned nothing, nor had aby interest in what my parent's history was. It was really sad, as I should have been asked for some input. I have discovered that my nieces and nephews too have no interest in the past, so I have decided to tell some of my familie's stories, otherwise they will be totally lost.

Duncan, your father must have been a brave man serving in the police force during that 'Emergency', my great uncle was serving too, up near Thika way. I still have a few of his old letters to my Grandfather during the period, which are pretty interesting. When my mum's parents moved to Thika from Australia after the war, the Emergency was starting to wind down, but they like many other settlers, all have their own stories of the so-called freedom fighters.

It was a bit like the wild west, all the farmers carried firearms, even at the dinner table. maybe I will bring that subject up under a different topic under other Conversations. Sadly I will need to be politically correct though, so I may not be able to put much in.

My father's parents lived at Karen, and when checking Google Earth Images it appears that their house is no longer there, it is now a Primate Research Centre, which is funny as my friends call me 'Mzuri' which was the name of the gorilla at the local zoo. I thought it was amusing.

Sad to hear that your father left his Obendorf 9.3 x 62 Mauser behind, they are a beautiful rifle and a great calibre. My father left all his rifles at the police post when he left Kenya too, including an old .450/400 3/4 inch double rifle (with hammers ), he said it was an oddball brand like Webley, or something like that.

Perhaps you can note some of your fathers stories too.

Nice to meet you

Regards

Rob
 

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Well Rob,

There are so many stories!

Until you mentioned my father being a brave man I have to admit I certainly never thought of him in such a way. The way we lived was just ‘normal’, he would come home after operations and life would just go on. I suppose normalised further when I served for a number of years in the South African bush war.

One of the really memorable trips of that time was a ‘safari’ that we did as a family in 1961 or 1962. We, my parents and my brother and I, drove from Cape Town to Nairobi in a Morris 1000 Traveller! Camped most nights in a tent next to the car in all sorts of weird and wonderful places. The most memorable was on the Limpopo river bank under the railway bridge. Would wake up scared stiff by the sound of the steam train crossing the bridge!

We had cousins and second cousins who farmed there as well. Firearms were part of life. I remember pistols at the diner table and next to beds at night and rifles being close at hand all of the time! My mother gardening with a pistol on her hip!

Times have changed.

It is really good to have met you. This has stirred up a lot of memories!

Regards

Duncan
 

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Hi Rob,

Thanks for your writings and pictures. Brings back memories!

I was born in Nakuru. My father was a policeman during the emergency.

Lived in Langata at one stage.

A time to remember and reminisce about unfortunately gone forever!

My father used an Obendorf Mauser in 9,3 x 62 which unfortunately was left behind when we had to leave.

Unfortunately have never been back.


Well Rob,

There are so many stories!

Until you mentioned my father being a brave man I have to admit I certainly never thought of him in such a way. The way we lived was just ‘normal’, he would come home after operations and life would just go on. I suppose normalised further when I served for a number of years in the South African bush war.

One of the really memorable trips of that time was a ‘safari’ that we did as a family in 1961 or 1962. We, my parents and my brother and I, drove from Cape Town to Nairobi in a Morris 1000 Traveller! Camped most nights in a tent next to the car in all sorts of weird and wonderful places. The most memorable was on the Limpopo river bank under the railway bridge. Would wake up scared stiff by the sound of the steam train crossing the bridge!

We had cousins and second cousins who farmed there as well. Firearms were part of life. I remember pistols at the diner table and next to beds at night and rifles being close at hand all of the time! My mother gardening with a pistol on her hip!

Times have changed.

It is really good to have met you. This has stirred up a lot of memories!

Regards

Duncan


Duncan,

Enjoying your stories.

We had friends in Tanzania that had four boys. When they came of age, their father bought each of them a semiautomatic Remington 30.06, when those rifles first came out. Each rifle had multiple clips encase of a Mau-Mau type incident. Each boy had 20+ rounds in clips as I recall. Don't think they were supposed to, but they all shot elephants with those rifles.

If you can add to the stories or add photos, that would be great.
 
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Hi Rob,

Thanks for your writings and pictures. Brings back memories!

I was born in Nakuru. My father was a policeman during the emergency.

Lived in Langata at one stage.

A time to remember and reminisce about unfortunately gone forever!

My father used an Obendorf Mauser in 9,3 x 62 which unfortunately was left behind when we had to leave.

Unfortunately have never been back.

maumauinkenya_cover.jpg

the natives suffered most from these great freedom fighters
It would certainly be interesting if AH members describe the time they experienced back then in Kenya.
 

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View attachment 348564
the natives suffered most from these great freedom fighters
It would certainly be interesting if AH members describe the time they experienced back then in Kenya.

G'day Foxi

I am feeling a bit guilty here as I appear to have hijacked the thread away from the Tsavo topic, and thank you for posting the name of the book in interest that I haven't come across.

I, like you, am totally fascinated to hear true accounts of the old Kenya/Africa, but, as a new member on a 'hunting forum', I am uncertain whether the administrators will approve of military topics, even if they are censored, as I really enjoy this site and don't want to be booted off.

In the interim, if you are really interested in hearing some old Kenyan stories, I can highly recommend the Audio CD which is by the well known hunter Finn Aagard, called 'Finn Aagard on Kenya'.

Which really brings up a very embarrassing moment for me, as a really good friend of mine purchased a copy of the CD in question, and at the time I didn't know much about Finn Aagard, other than that he wrote firearm articles in American magazines. Well, as the CD was about Kenya in the old days, I thought that my parents may like to reminisce by listening to it.

Well, I turned the CD on, when all of a sudden my mum said, "Finn, I was dated before I met your father, but it doesn't sound like Finn, he sounds old" ! I was stunned, but responded to say that Finn is old now too, remember you don't sound like you are young anymore! I also said that it may be a narrator ?? Either way, my mum just comes out with the most embarrassing subjects, She said that Finn was death as a post, as Finn and my mother had just returned from a night on the town in Nairobi, and was dropping my mother off at her parents farm north of Thika. Apparently my grandfather was waiting up for his daughter, and Finn was trying to get more of a good night peck, when my mother saw my grandfather approaching the car in the dark, she was trying to warn Finn of the danger, but he was death and heard nothing until it was too late. :ROFLMAO:

Either way, there wasn't many single young white woman in those days, and it was like a small town, everyone knew everyone. My family didn't hang around the "White Mischief" groups, but knew a few who did.

Finn and his good friend, another good hunter, Fritz Walter used to hunt on my Grandfather's farm. I still have the skull mount of a Lesser Kudu which Fritz Walter gave to my mother as a gift, which was shot on the farm. My grandfather also had problems with a stray bull buffalo which decided to be the chief of the herd of dairy cows, which was a huge problem when it came to milking. The buffalo also gave a few hunters the run for their money, stalking them from behind, and scaring the hell out of them. It wasn't a huge bull, but my uncle still has the horns in his shed at Langata. My grandfather never mentioned the successful hunters name, I know it wasn't Fritz, who knows, maybe it was Finn ??

Regards
Rob

Finn Aagaard On Kenya - Audio CD.jpg
 
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Dinosaur

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Well Rob,

There are so many stories!

Until you mentioned my father being a brave man I have to admit I certainly never thought of him in such a way. The way we lived was just ‘normal’, he would come home after operations and life would just go on. I suppose normalised further when I served for a number of years in the South African bush war.

One of the really memorable trips of that time was a ‘safari’ that we did as a family in 1961 or 1962. We, my parents and my brother and I, drove from Cape Town to Nairobi in a Morris 1000 Traveller! Camped most nights in a tent next to the car in all sorts of weird and wonderful places. The most memorable was on the Limpopo river bank under the railway bridge. Would wake up scared stiff by the sound of the steam train crossing the bridge!

We had cousins and second cousins who farmed there as well. Firearms were part of life. I remember pistols at the diner table and next to beds at night and rifles being close at hand all of the time! My mother gardening with a pistol on her hip!

Times have changed.

It is really good to have met you. This has stirred up a lot of memories!

Regards

Duncan


G'day Duncan,

Sorry to hear that you experienced the South African Bush War, it would have been a hell of a learning experience, but besides the brutal combat itself, you would have seen a lot of unknown africa, and it's beauty too.

Your trip from Cape Town to Nairobi sounds like a real adventure, I was in tears of laughter when you mentioned being woken up in the night by a stream train travelling over your head, I can only imagine the deafening noise come from the train wheels on the tracks, let alone the noise from the steam engine itself. :ROFLMAO:

It must feel really strange, not knowing what you will come across during your morris trip, some areas being docile, and others full of unexpected highlights, man, I am still laughing at your train episode.

I would love to hear more, keep up the great work.

Regards

Rob
 

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G'day Foxi

I am feeling a bit guilty here as I appear to have hijacked the thread away from the Tsavo topic, and thank you for posting the name of the book in interest that I haven't come across.

I, like you, am totally fascinated to hear true accounts of the old Kenya/Africa, but, as a new member on a 'hunting forum', I am uncertain whether the administrators will approve of military topics, even if they are censored, as I really enjoy this site and don't want to be booted off.

In the interim, if you are really interested in hearing some old Kenyan stories, I can highly recommend the Audio CD which is by the well known hunter Finn Aagard, called 'Finn Aagard on Kenya'.

Which really brings up a very embarrassing moment for me, as a really good friend of mine purchased a copy of the CD in question, and at the time I didn't know much about Finn Aagard, other than that he wrote firearm articles in American magazines. Well, as the CD was about Kenya in the old days, I thought that my parents may like to reminisce by listening to it.

Well, I turned the CD on, when all of a sudden my mum said, "Finn, I was dated before I met your father, but it doesn't sound like Finn, he sounds old" ! I was stunned, but responded to say that Finn is old now too, remember you don't sound like you are young anymore! I also said that it may be a narrator ?? Either way, my mum just comes out with the most embarrassing subjects, She said that Finn was death as a post, as Finn and my mother had just returned from a night on the town in Nairobi, and was dropping my mother off at her parents farm north of Thika. Apparently my grandfather was waiting up for his daughter, and Finn was trying to get more of a good night peck, when my mother saw my grandfather approaching the car in the dark, she was trying to warn Finn of the danger, but he was death and heard nothing until it was too late. :ROFLMAO:

Either way, there wasn't many single young white woman in those days, and it was like a small town, everyone knew everyone. My family didn't hang around the "White Mischief" groups, but knew a few who did.

Finn and his good friend, another good hunter, Fritz Walter used to hunt on my Grandfather's farm. I still have the skull mount of a Lesser Kudu which Fritz Walter gave to my mother as a gift, which was shot on the farm. My grandfather also had problems with a stray bull buffalo which decided to be the chief of the herd of dairy cows, which was a huge problem when it came to milking. The buffalo also gave a few hunters the run for their money, stalking them from behind, and scaring the hell out of them. It wasn't a huge bull, but my uncle still has the horns in his shed at Langata. My grandfather never mentioned the successful hunters name, I know it wasn't Fritz, who knows, maybe it was Finn ??

Regards
Rob

View attachment 348975


Love the story about your mother and Aagard.

If you wanted to start a thread dealing with the war in Kenya/Mau Mau I don't think you would have any problems from Jerome @AfricaHunting.com or @BRICKBURN . In fact I think they would welcome the thread as would I. If they were concerned they will comment to us now.

Interesting that your grandparents are from Thika. As a kid I remember being with my family looking at the Thika Falls. I had never seen Niagara Falls at the time and I remember my father saying that Thika is a scaled down version of Niagara.

With grandparents from Thika, have you ever read "The Flame Trees of Thika"? Did your grandparents know the Huxley's.

Enjoying your history. Thanks.
 

Foxi

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MAu MAu ist a part of the OLD Africa in the days of Robert Ruark
We are all fascinated by stories like this.
Enjoying your history als0.
Foxi
 
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G'day Foxi,

It's the British version of a jeep, it's a Land Rover MK I, the roofs were removable.

If you want to see one in action, please watch the movie, 'The Gods Must Be Crazy', you will laugh your head off.

Regards

Rob
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I didn't know a movie about a coke bottle cold be so hilarious. Loved the part where the Winchester the Landry up a tree.
It should be mandatory viewing during lockdown for AH members
Bob
 

tigris115

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Tbh, I believe that the attacks on the train camps by the Tsavo maneaters were carried by more than 2 lions. If I recall correctly, pug marks can be unreliable to ID a cat and the crowded conditions/poor sanitation at those camps would be an instant dinner bell to any predator to grab some Indian food and disappear into the bush. Add to that, the previous slave caravans helped to educate the lions there on the tastiness of the naked apes.
 

CBH Australia

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Tigris115 you may be right. That makes sense. The science to identify them etc would have been way behind today’s let alone the resources for that out there.
If the movie , the book etc are true accounts I guess the people of the time did consider it was the same 2 after Col, Patterson got the first one. Either way it’s interesting.

I will try not to think on it to much because I don’t want to spoil it next time I watch the movie, the storyline works and I believed it until now
:unsure:?
.
 

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