ZIMBABWE: March 2023 Amadundamela Forest Reserve Management Elephant Bull Hunt With CMS Safaris

About the meat, a subject almost as dear to me as hunting itself... this is how we did it
Bring a dozen helpers. Lots of axes, knives, and a tractor with a trailer. Cut a trail in from the nearest place that is possible to drive to (the power cutline)
Start by skinning the top side into three panels. Save the skin for processing into leather later. Debone. Place chunks on the trailer or on chunks of hide to keep them "clean". Flip carcass using a truck and ropes, repeat. Six hours later, voilà! View attachment 523023View attachment 523024View attachment 523025View attachment 523026View attachment 523027View attachment 523028View attachment 523029View attachment 523030View attachment 523031View attachment 523032View attachment 523033View attachment 523034View attachment 523035A trailer full of three tonnes of meat and nothing but bones left in the bush. The bones will also be hauled out after the vultures are done picking them clean.
Fresh meat may be cooked on the spot, as we did for our lunch and as did an old forestry tracker who looked hungry and underfed, may be made into a stew, like we did for our supper in camp, or processed into sun-dried meat strips as most of the three tonnes was.
The meat is coarse, kinda like tough beef. Tasted good. Although some cuts are said to be "gamey", I think that's just because of the normally primitive butchering conditions. The bottom side of the carcass collected blood over night since we couldn't field dress or bleed the carcass, so the bottom side cuts might not be as good for fresh meat. It was almost all processed into skinny sun dried strips but we didn't eat any of that. The kebabs we had, cooked on the spot were excellent! And a stew we ate the next day was as good as any other stew I suppose. It was tender but don't know how long it was cooked. The heart, although as big as a 20L pail, was fine grained and delicious. I thought it might be coarse, but it had the same texture as beef or elk.
Each worker gets a share, weighed out on a scale. We delivered half of the meat to the other forestry camp nearby, where the same drying and distribution system occurred.
After the week we spent at the camp, we dropped off some of the Amadundamela forestry workers at their local villages. They were packing big potato sacks full of dried meat, and were very pleased to share with their family and friends.
Sir,
Thank you for sharing your hunt experience, as well as the details and pictures of the post hunt breakdown of the meat, skins and carcass.

As an R&D Chef and just a country farm boy, I found this extremely interesting.

I’ve always wondered, exactly how the game is processed, how much meat goes to the local community,how do you transport that quantity of meat ,AND, what does elephant taste like, and how to cook it.
I want to taste and enjoy some grilled elephant heart; maybe one day.

You have shared important, real world details.
I don’t normally suggest what people should do, But You should publish this story.
CajunchefRay
 
Congratulations Longwalker, and thank you for your great retelling of your adventure. It is definitely a memorable experience :oops:
 
Congratulations on a GREAT hunt and a well written story. That is the best hunt report I have read here in the past couple of years. And there are some fantastic reports on here. That will be a lifelong memory for both you and your wife. Well done, Sir.
 
Congratulation! That is an experience that will be ingrained in you for the rest of your life. Thank you for your excellent recount of a harrowing encounter.
 
An amazing hunt and a well written account. Very much enjoyed the tale and felt as if I was there with your writing style. I had the pleasure of hunting buffalo and plains game with Allan in the Zambezi valley in 2021.
 
Incredible. So glad everyone was safe. The blood spatter beyond where you were standing really brings the reality of the dangerous situation home. And you handled it like a pro!
 
Awesome story of an amazing hunt. Well done, I fully enjoyed the read.

MB
 
Congratulations on an excellent bull and great story .... Are you planning another elephant hunt after that one?
 
About the meat, a subject almost as dear to me as hunting itself... this is how we did it
Bring a dozen helpers. Lots of axes, knives, and a tractor with a trailer. Cut a trail in from the nearest place that is possible to drive to (the power cutline)
Start by skinning the top side into three panels. Save the skin for processing into leather later. Debone. Place chunks on the trailer or on chunks of hide to keep them "clean". Flip carcass using a truck and ropes, repeat. Six hours later, voilà! View attachment 523023View attachment 523024View attachment 523025View attachment 523026View attachment 523027View attachment 523028View attachment 523029View attachment 523030View attachment 523031View attachment 523032View attachment 523033View attachment 523034View attachment 523035A trailer full of three tonnes of meat and nothing but bones left in the bush. The bones will also be hauled out after the vultures are done picking them clean.
Fresh meat may be cooked on the spot, as we did for our lunch and as did an old forestry tracker who looked hungry and underfed, may be made into a stew, like we did for our supper in camp, or processed into sun-dried meat strips as most of the three tonnes was.
The meat is coarse, kinda like tough beef. Tasted good. Although some cuts are said to be "gamey", I think that's just because of the normally primitive butchering conditions. The bottom side of the carcass collected blood over night since we couldn't field dress or bleed the carcass, so the bottom side cuts might not be as good for fresh meat. It was almost all processed into skinny sun dried strips but we didn't eat any of that. The kebabs we had, cooked on the spot were excellent! And a stew we ate the next day was as good as any other stew I suppose. It was tender but don't know how long it was cooked. The heart, although as big as a 20L pail, was fine grained and delicious. I thought it might be coarse, but it had the same texture as beef or elk.
Each worker gets a share, weighed out on a scale. We delivered half of the meat to the other forestry camp nearby, where the same drying and distribution system occurred.
After the week we spent at the camp, we dropped off some of the Amadundamela forestry workers at their local villages. They were packing big potato sacks full of dried meat, and were very pleased to share with their family and friends.

This is the part the most greenies do not understand or do not want to accept at all. The benefits to the community from this old bull will pay huge dividends in the conservation of these wonderful animals.

Thank you for taking us along.
 
Well that had me sitting here rather tense, was like a good Wilbur Smith book!
Also enjoyed the processing bit as well!
Hope you get to go again!!
 
Congrats and thanks for sharing!
 
When we went back the next morning to butcher and haul meat, and my wife took this picture after some brush had been cleared away. I'm standing in the spot where I was when he charged. He rolled over towards my right as he died, so head and trunk was actually a bit closer during the shooting ...
P1010831 (1).jpeg
 
When we went back the next morning to butcher and haul meat, and my wife took this picture after some brush had been cleared away. I'm standing in the spot where I was when he charged. He rolled over towards my right as he died, so head and trunk was actually a bit closer during the shooting ...View attachment 523323
Wow…that’s what memories are made of!!! I bet you and your wife won’t forget the hunt for the rest of your lives!! Again congratulations.
 
Was thinking about your elephant last night and why he charged.
I wonder if he had bad teeth maybe lost one or two. Could have been why he lost weight.
Had dairy cows charge me when they had been sick. Ones that you could usually walk right up to when in fine health.
What ever it was he sure had a bee in his bonne.
 
Was thinking about your elephant last night and why he charged.
I wonder if he had bad teeth maybe lost one or two. Could have been why he lost weight.
Had dairy cows charge me when they had been sick. Ones that you could usually walk right up to when in fine health.
What ever it was he sure had a bee in his bonne.
Visiting a beef stud, decades ago (Brahmans, which are usually pretty docile, supposedly.) In the yard with the stud bull, over a ton in weight, and I wasn't paying attention. Found myself backed up against a fencepost, with him gently leaning his head against my chest, slowly increasing the pressure to the point I couldn't breathe. Luckily one of the stud crew came up and punched him in the nose, making him back off. An old trick he'd pull on all the "new boys"...
 
Visiting a beef stud, decades ago (Brahmans, which are usually pretty docile, supposedly.) In the yard with the stud bull, over a ton in weight, and I wasn't paying attention. Found myself backed up against a fencepost, with him gently leaning his head against my chest, slowly increasing the pressure to the point I couldn't breathe. Luckily one of the stud crew came up and punched him in the nose, making him back off. An old trick he'd pull on all the "new boys"...
Had that with an old calf club pet that turned into a milker, used to give her a scratch. She loved that and would lean in one day I was pushing the Heard in and she thought she would come in for a scratch and lean. Between me and the backing gate. Two broken ribs latter…..that very slow lean was not a nice way to have that done.
Anyway back to the op
 

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tacklers wrote on ianevans's profile.
Hi Ian, I'm contemplating my first outing, leaving UK via Dubai to Africa, taking rifles as you did.

I presume it went okay for you, would you have done anything differently? Cheers, Richard East Sussex
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Are you still looking for a 375 H&H?
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