Transitioning To A Blaser R8 - A Two Months / 500 Rounds Review

TOBY458

AH legend
Joined
Jan 23, 2014
Messages
2,145
Reaction score
3,828
Location
Madison Georgia, USA
Media
180
Articles
2
Hunting reports
Africa
3
@One Day...
I will say this. Owning an R8 must free up a lot of time to write posts! Hahaha!
You make some very valid points. I've been on the fence about buying an R8 for some time now. I'm just afraid I will like it too much and end up spending thousands of dollars on barrels and scopes to go with the original purchase.

One question I do have for the R8 owners. Can they be cycled slowly when chambering a round? Or is a very fast movement of the bolt needed to ensure the round is chambered and the lugs/fingers lock in place?
 

bowjijohn

AH senior member
Joined
Oct 27, 2020
Messages
54
Reaction score
142
Media
2
Articles
1
They can be cycled slowly and quietly if required

On the point of the 'safety catch'

It is a first class idea and the rifle is certainly unable to fire when the safety (or rather cocking slide) is all the way back

However it takes a bit of effort to slide the safety into the firing position as you are in effect loading the firing pin spring.

When I first got my R8 - about 3 years ago - I made the mistake (only once !) of anchoring my trigger finger around the trigger to help with the force required from the thumb.

Don't do It !

The rifle fires instantly the safety lever is forward if your finger is on the trigger - !! of course !!

Having my trigger finger anywhere near the trigger is not something I'd dream of doing with a standard safety, but on this occasion I was looking to help the thumb when encountering considerable resistance of the safety slide
 

yhc

AH veteran
Joined
Mar 1, 2020
Messages
112
Reaction score
141
Location
Alaska
Media
14
Member of
NRA Life Member
Hunted
USA, Germany, Austria
@One Day... Welcome to the dark side!!


When I first got my R8 - about 3 years ago - I made the mistake (only once !) of anchoring my trigger finger around the trigger to help with the force required from the thumb.

Don't do It !
Yikes...hopefully it wasn’t a large caliber!!
 

One Day...

Gold supporter
AH elite
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Messages
1,224
Reaction score
3,132
Website
www.huntershillsafaris.co.za
Media
378
Articles
1
Hunting reports
Africa
3
Member of
PHASA
Hunted
Europe, America, Canada, Africa
The review...

Now, on to the good stuff...

In the following posts I will review the points typically identified as weaknesses about the Blaser R8, now that I own one and was able to take it apart. Hopefully this will be useful to folks debating whether a R8 is worth their money...

Part 1: the R8 stock

A lot has been written about the fact that the Blaser R8 Professional has an injection molded polymer stock.

"Tupperware" injection molded stocks have a cheap reputation in the US and are typically thin, flexible, etc. and generally just that: cheap. I remember removing one from my Winchester 70 Stainless Classic, and regretting buying one for my Remington 870: it was a fragile affair with a dismal attachment point for the action screw, that kept flexing in and compressing as I was tightening the screw...

So what about the R8 stock?

The first point I will make it that this is no flimsy Tupperware! I was flabbergasted by the THICKNESS of the material...

R8 stock.jpg


R8 forearm thickness.jpg


R8 buttstock thickness.jpg


The second point I will make it that this is no flimsy Tupperware! The R8 stock with its alloy receiver/bedding block is almost 1 lbs. heavier than the CZ 550 Aramid (a.k.a. Bell & Carlson Kevlar) stock with its aluminum bedding block.

Blaser R8 stock weight.jpg


CZ 550 Aramid stock with aluminum bedding block.jpg


The third point I will make it that when Blaser decided to go the injection molding route for the R8 stock, I doubt they did it to save money. For examples, there are thick internal ribs in the forearm; the buttstock is not empty or filled with foam, there is an insert in it with a tunnel for the kickstop; and, the recoil pad is not attached with the usual wood screws directly in the stock material, but with metal screws in brass inserts.

R8 forearm.jpg


R8 buttstock inserts.jpg


I do not know what exact chemical composition is the polymer used by Blaser, but it seems eerily similar to the one used by Glock, and it is fair to say that Glock pistols have demonstrated their indestructibility in the worst field conditions since the introduction of the Glock 17 in 1982.

In summary, the R8 stock is a high quality affair. Whether a Kevlar shell filled with foam is better or not than heavy gauge injection molded polymer can be debated endlessly, but I can tell you that the R8 stock does not flex when I am leaning heavily on it to "load the tripod" and I will worry about a lot of things going wrong with my African hunting kit before I worry about the R8 stock :)
 
Last edited:

meigsbucks

AH elite
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
1,198
Reaction score
1,436
Location
Central Ohio
Media
19
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
SCI, NRA Life Member
Hunted
Zimbabwe and Namibia
First, as I stated in another post, will be purchasing a R8. I’m truly admire the Blaser system. Although I’ve only handled them at shows, these are the “issues” I see.
Although it does take a little extra pressure to cock the rifle, I found decocking the rifle was harder.
I do have some concerns with the amount of plastic on such a pricey rifle. The mag inserts are a hard plastic but still plastic. The stock too is injection molded plastic. I would expect a rifle in this price range to have a Kevlar stock.
Due to the trigger and magazine being integral with one another, if the magazine is damaged, you have an inoperable rifle. Yes, you can purchase an extra trigger unit but they are pricey.
Even with these concerns and what I view as negatives, I continue to save my pennies toward the purchase of an R8.
 

Red Leg

Lifetime bronze benefactor
AH ambassador
Joined
May 19, 2009
Messages
6,066
Reaction score
16,507
Location
Texas Hill Country
Media
267
Articles
5
Hunting reports
Africa
2
USA/Canada
4
Mex/S.Amer
1
Europe
3
Member of
SCI DSC life memberships / NRA Patron Life
Hunted
Mexico, Namibia, RSA, Germany, Austria, Argentina, Canada, Mozambique, Spain, US (15 states)
First, as I stated in another post, will be purchasing a R8. I’m truly admire the Blaser system. Although I’ve only handled them at shows, these are the “issues” I see.
Although it does take a little extra pressure to cock the rifle, I found decocking the rifle was harder.
I do have some concerns with the amount of plastic on such a pricey rifle. The mag inserts are a hard plastic but still plastic. The stock too is injection molded plastic. I would expect a rifle in this price range to have a Kevlar stock.
Due to the trigger and magazine being integral with one another, if the magazine is damaged, you have an inoperable rifle. Yes, you can purchase an extra trigger unit but they are pricey.
Even with these concerns and what I view as negatives, I continue to save my pennies toward the purchase of an R8.
Decocking takes hardly any effort at all. One presses forward slightly on the cocking slide and it very easily comes back to the decock position under released spring pressure - significantly less effort than cocking - that is not an opinion. ;)
 
Last edited:

TTundra

AH fanatic
Joined
Jul 29, 2015
Messages
603
Reaction score
851
Location
Greensboro, NC
Media
56
Hunting reports
Africa
2
Hunted
RSA (Limpopo), USA , CAN
First, as I stated in another post, will be purchasing a R8. I’m truly admire the Blaser system. Although I’ve only handled them at shows, these are the “issues” I see.
Although it does take a little extra pressure to cock the rifle, I found decocking the rifle was harder.
I do have some concerns with the amount of plastic on such a pricey rifle. The mag inserts are a hard plastic but still plastic. The stock too is injection molded plastic. I would expect a rifle in this price range to have a Kevlar stock.
Due to the trigger and magazine being integral with one another, if the magazine is damaged, you have an inoperable rifle. Yes, you can purchase an extra trigger unit but they are pricey.
Even with these concerns and what I view as negatives, I continue to save my pennies toward the purchase of an R8.
@meigsbucks I can relate as I've been contemplating an R8 for a while.
@One Day... as I work in manufacturing, I can assure you a molded stock is quite the savings for production, assuming the tooling for such a large cavity mold is amortized or paid for (I suspect quickly for these price tags though). That however, does not mean less strength. Proper engineering (the ribs mentioned) and other supports allow for a extremely strong structure. I would expect the strength of a proper molded stock to surprise many a shooter. It was, by my belief, necessary to bring the cost down to gain more sales unit volume. Certainly a good decision by the amount of newer R8 owners seen on various forums.

When my "wants" and "project builds" are complete that I have now, I'm sure an R8 or its eventual successor (if it happens) are in my future. I love different, and combining that with extremely well functioning, it's just a win win
 

Newby

AH veteran
Joined
Oct 22, 2019
Messages
130
Reaction score
235
Location
Australia
Hunted
Australia, New Zealand, North America, UK, Central Asia
The thickness and strength of the stock is easily understood if we keep in mind that the barrell channel needs be able to be opened up to accept 22mm bls, and that the exact same stock must cope with regular use of the 500 Jeffrey without failing.
 

Newby

AH veteran
Joined
Oct 22, 2019
Messages
130
Reaction score
235
Location
Australia
Hunted
Australia, New Zealand, North America, UK, Central Asia
@TOBY458 Although the bolt can be cycled slowly and quietly, you run the risk of encountering the Blaser "click". Not every time, but it seems always at the wrong time.

The round chambers fine, and lockup is complete, but some internal safety feature, which operates a little like a transfer bar in a revolver, will stop the firing pin reaching the primer - "Click". Snappy cycling stops this.

It's a common question, but keep in mind that the ability to carry in COMPLETE safety, with a chambered round, but uncocked, means that slow and quiet cycling is simply unnecessary.

Not all guides and PHs understand this, and some who do, may not like the idea of being followed by a hunter with a safely chambered round who could potentially and excitedly push the cocking slide on at the wrong time.

Conversely, I have met Blaser owners who had sucb a poor understanding of their rifles that they carried them cocked 100% of the time, but withe bolt open to be "safe".

I think the European emphasis on driven hunts with groups of hunters here and there, has motivated the development of the high level of safety. The removal fire control (mag housing/trigger) is another example. When that is out, it is clear for anyone to see that the rifle is inert. Even if a round should be accidentally left in the chamber, once the fire control is removed, the rifle can't be cocked, and the chambered round can't be fired. A little complicated but brilliantly designed and executed, as long as the fire control isn't misplaced.

I never remove the fire control unless it is absolutely necessary, and on hunts away from home, carry a spare fire control and mag insert(s).

The ability to carry with a chambered round and the action closed against debris in complete safety was one of the major factors in me buying my first Blaser R93 around 20 years ago.
 

One Day...

Gold supporter
AH elite
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Messages
1,224
Reaction score
3,132
Website
www.huntershillsafaris.co.za
Media
378
Articles
1
Hunting reports
Africa
3
Member of
PHASA
Hunted
Europe, America, Canada, Africa
The review... Part 2 - the R8 detachable magazine & trigger

A lot has also been written about the fact that the Blaser R8 has a detachable magazine & trigger, and that the they are made of plastic.

This is not entirely accurate, and there is a lot more to it.

In fact, the base of the detachable magazine is metallic. It can actually be ordered either in steel or in alloy. The steel unit comes standard with the stocks that have the steel receiver. The steel unit adds 3.4 oz. to the weight of the rifle compared to the alloy unit.

The trigger itself is indeed nested in the detachable magazine metallic base, but NOT the trigger mechanism. The trigger is a single part that rotates on an axle. As the trigger is pulled, its pointed heel rises behind the magazine rear wall and actuates the trigger mechanism located at the rear of the receiver.

The side walls of the magazine are indeed made of injection molded polymer, as are the two side clips that attach the magazine to the receiver.

R8 detachable magazine & trigger.jpg


I will honestly admit that I was concerned about the magazine and trigger being apparently (operating word: apparently) attached to the receiver by only two small plastic clips. There is a fair amount of contact surface in these two clips, but not a lot a contact depth: 0.75 mm / 0.03" if my caliper is correct. It would not take too much polymer fatigue for these two clips to not engage firmly into the receiver recesses...

R8 magazine retainer clips.jpg


It was not until I looked inside the magazine, after removing the spring leaf that raises the magazine inserts, that I realized that the two polymer clips are backed by two metal parts...

R8 detachable magazine inside.jpg


And it was not until I took apart the metallic magazine base, that I realized that there is an ingenious metallic, spring-loaded mechanism that solidly backs the polymer clips and prevents accidental detachment because each polymer clip can only move if both are depressed at the same time.

R8 magazine release internals.jpg


Additionally, a magazine release slide safety is located at the front of the magazine and prevents the magazine from being detached, if engaged.

R8 detachable magazine safety.jpg


In summary, there is A LOT MORE to the R8 detachable magazine release system than just 2 plastic clips. Would I prefer these two clips to be spring steel and engage twice as deep in the received recesses? Honestly, yes I would - I am on record for stating that whatever is detachable is also losable - and will I engage the magazine release slide safety when hunting, and top load the magazine? Honestly, yes I probably will, but this is me. Is the R8 magazine likely to detach accidentally? Honestly, I do not think so...

The magazine is completed by inserts that are specifically designed and marked to be used with specific cartridges.

R8 magazine inserts.jpg


These inserts are injection molded polymer, and use the acclaimed original Mannlicher Schonauer spring loaded rotary spool design. They feed smoothly and flawlessly. And the bullet tips are even protected by a rubber bumper at the front of the magazine. Some serious thinking went into this magazine...

R8 spool magazine front.jpg
R8 spring loaded spool magazine.jpg


Is there an issue with polymer magazines? No there is not, as demonstrated by an overwhelming majority, including the US and German military, who replaced their AR15 / M4 / HK etc. aluminum or steel magazines with PMAG, Thermold, SIG, HK, etc. polymer magazines.

In summary, if Blaser made the decision to use of a mix of metal and polymer parts in the R8 detachable magazine, I doubt they did it to save money. This is a very well engineered and very well manufactured unit.

I also doubt that the detachable magazine will let people down in the field, but if you want an extra layer of certitude, you just need to engage the magazine release safety.
 
Last edited:

One Day...

Gold supporter
AH elite
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Messages
1,224
Reaction score
3,132
Website
www.huntershillsafaris.co.za
Media
378
Articles
1
Hunting reports
Africa
3
Member of
PHASA
Hunted
Europe, America, Canada, Africa
...
@One Day... as I work in manufacturing, I can assure you a molded stock is quite the savings for production, assuming the tooling for such a large cavity mold is amortized or paid for (I suspect quickly for these price tags though). That however, does not mean less strength. Proper engineering (the ribs mentioned) and other supports allow for a extremely strong structure. I would expect the strength of a proper molded stock to surprise many a shooter. It was, by my belief, necessary to bring the cost down to gain more sales unit volume. Certainly a good decision by the amount of newer R8 owners seen on various forums.

Agree TTundra :)

I am not making the point that injection molding is less expensive than hand laying kevlar, I know it is. I am making the point that I suspect that Blaser made this choice not for financial reasons but because it was in their view the best engineering choice for their purpose.

In so many words, the use of polymer parts does not represent cutting corners on costs and compromising the end product quality, but applying the best engineering of available modern materials. Based upon taking apart my R8, I believe that the parts that need to be made of metal, are; and the parts that can be made reliably of polymer, are. Just like the Glock pistols...

I agree with you that an injection molded polymer stock with the R8 stock characteristics is likely stronger than most Kevlar shell and foam filler stocks ;)
 
Last edited:

One Day...

Gold supporter
AH elite
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Messages
1,224
Reaction score
3,132
Website
www.huntershillsafaris.co.za
Media
378
Articles
1
Hunting reports
Africa
3
Member of
PHASA
Hunted
Europe, America, Canada, Africa
The review... Part 3 - the R8 barrels

Blaser offers a large number of barrels for the R8.

To summarize:
  • "standard" profile barrels have a diameter of 17 mm / 0.67" at the muzzle.
  • "semi weight" profile barrels have a diameter of 19 mm / 0.75" at the muzzle.
  • "safari" and match barrels have a diameter of 22 mm / 0.86" at the muzzle (Note: the one exception is the .300 Win Selous barrel that has a diameter of 19 mm at the muzzle).
  • non-magnum caliber barrels are 58 cm / 22.8" long (Note: they can be special ordered with a length of 52 cm / 20.5").
  • magnum caliber barrels are 65 cm / 25.6" long (Note: they can be special ordered with a length of 58 cm / 22.8").
  • Any barrel can be ordered with or without iron sights.

1606699505490.png


Four points need to be made:

1) "Standard" profile R8 barrels are heavier than the typical American sporter barrels. For example my Weatherby Mark V .340 Wby has a muzzle diameter of 0.6" / 15.3 mm; and my Winchester 70 Classic Stainless .300 Wby has a muzzle diameter of 0.58" / 14.7 mm. In contrast, my "standard" R8 barrels have a muzzle diameter of 0.67" / 17 mm.

2) "Semi weight" barrels are significantly heavier, and "safari" barrels even more. Expect an ~11.5 lbs. "semi weight" scoped rifle with the kickstop in place to balance the rifle, and a ~12.5 lbs. "safari" scoped rifle with the kickstop in place to balance the rifle.

3) The flexibility to build the rifle you want is one of the advantages of the R8 system.
  • Some want a 11.5 lbs. scoped .375. You get there with a "semi weight" barrel, the kickstop, and a typical 2.5-10x42 scope.
  • Others like a 9.5 lbs. scoped .375. This is what the R8 weighs with a "standard" barrel, no kickstop and a typical 2.5-10x42 scope.
  • Others prefer a 8.5 lbs. scoped .375. You get there by ordering a shorter 22.8" (580 mm) "standard" barrel, no kickstop, and putting a light 1-4x24 scope on it.
  • Personally, I like a scoped .375 around 10.5 lbs. I get there with the "standard" barrel, the kickstop and a 2.5-10x42 scope.
To each their own (y)
  • And many will welcome a 12.5 lbs. scoped .416 Rem or .458 Lott. You get there with a "safari" barrel and the kickstop. Make it 13.5 lbs. with a steel receiver.
4) The R8 barrels length is not comparable to typical American barrels length. Because the bolt locks directly into the barrel of the R8, the R8 barrels have a 25 mm / 0.98" recess, and are in fact ~1" shorter than comparable American barrels.

R8 barrel bolt locking recess.jpg


As a consequence, R8 magnum barrels are in fact the equivalent length of American 24.6" barrels.

I was concerned about muzzle velocity. Magnum barrels loose typically 30 to 40 fps. per inch...

.223 Rem standard 58 cm / 22.8" (actual 21.8") barrel
The Federal American Eagle 55 gr FMJ load has a factory muzzle velocity of 3240 fps.
My R8 barrel clocks exactly 3240 average for 20 rounds.

.257 Wby standard 65 cm / 25.6" (actual 24.6") barrel
I was highly curious because the .257 Wby has acquired a reputation for often shooting at about the same muzzle velocity in Weatherby Vanguard 24" barrels and Weatherby Mark V 26" barrels.

The Weatherby .257 Wby 100 gr TTSX factory load has a factory muzzle velocity of 3570 fps.
My R8 barrel clocks 3470 average for 20 rounds.

Considering that this same load clocks 3580 fps (actually 10 fps faster than spec) in my Mark V, I know the factory spec to be realistic (a rarity with Weatherby ammunition ;) ). Therefore, loosing 100 fps with the R8 is disappointing. Sure, it is in line with the barrel being 1.5" shorter (this may account for 45 to 60 fps), but, more probably, I guess that the Blaser throat is shorter than the Weatherby throat. Well..... it will last longer...

.300 Wby standard 65 cm / 25.6" (actual 24.6") barrel
The Weatherby .300 Wby 165 gr TTSX factory load has a factory muzzle velocity of 3330 fps.
My R8 barrel clocks 3248 average for 20 rounds.

This same load clocks 3255 fps in my CZ 550 with 26" McGowen chrome moly steel hand-lapped match barrel.

Unexpectedly, the 24.6" R8 barrel clocks almost the same speed as the 26" McGowen barrel. I can speculate that the absence of the long Weatherby throat could account for a loss of 80 fps on both barrels (?). This would be consistent with the lower speed in the .257 Wby barrel too...

.375 H&H standard 65 cm / 25.6" (actual 24.6") barrel
The Barnes .375 H&H 300 gr TSX factory load has a factory muzzle velocity of 2450 fps.
My R8 barrel clocks 2490 average for 20 rounds.

I believe that the Barnes .375 H&H loads are clocked with a 24" barrel at the factory, so it is not surprising that the R8 barrel clocks a little faster than spec.

Does it matter?
Sure it matters, but not until 350 yards for the .257 and .300 Wby, which essentially means that it does not matter :ROFLMAO:


PS: nonetheless, since I have embraced modernity with the R8 and I put scopes on the Wby barrels that can look far (Zeiss V4 4-16x50), I plugged the actual chronographed muzzle speeds in the Shooter App before I sent the ballistic tables to Kenton Industries for the engraving of two custom BDC turrets. More on this later...
 
Last edited:
Joined
Oct 28, 2018
Messages
3,034
Reaction score
4,490
Location
Wyong new south Wales Australia
Media
8
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
SSAA
Hunted
Australia
@One Day...
You have become quite the convert.
And have put into words many of the feelings I have for the R8.
Welcome to the fold.
@BeeMaa and @oneday
Between the 2 of you you have almost converted me to the R8 if it wasn't for the fact that in Australia it would set me back $14,000 or more for a rifle, 2 scope mounts ,2 scopes and 2 barrels. Rifle with one barrel is 8 grand plus, scope mounts 870 bucks each, 2 scopes God knows and 2nd barrel 1,800 bucks.
If I could afford it I would love a K95 Blaser in 35 Whelen, my 25 wild cat and 22 hornet. Now that would be sweet.
Bob
 

Tally-Ho HUNTING SAFARIS

Sponsor
Since 2015
AH fanatic
Reviews
2
Joined
May 14, 2013
Messages
855
Reaction score
905
Website
www.tallyho.co.za
Media
649
Member of
SCI, PHASA, SA Wingshooters
No actually I did not. I have the standard barrel channel and the standard barrels with iron sights.

Here is the data. I weighed twice, one time in metric units and one time in imperial units so that it speaks to all AH members. As expected, the conversion from grams into lbs. comes within a few decimal points of the imperial measurements because I only use 4 decimal positions for the conversion. Close enough!

I might add that this is exactly the type of data - generally missing on the web - that was critical to my hesitations. A big thank you again to dchamp and Red Leg who weighed their various R8 components to help me make my decisions...

View attachment 377375

I selected to take a steel trigger group instead of an alloy trigger group. This adds 3.4 oz.

Note that the .257 is heavier than the .300, and the .300 is heavier than the .375, because all 3 barrels have the same external profile, and therefore different wall thicknesses. The .223 is lighter because its barrel is shorter (58 cm / 22.8" vs. 65 cm / 25.6").

The Blaser R8 is barrel heavy in standard form. Even more so, I imagine, with semi weight barrels. I added the 16 oz. kickstop for 4 reasons:

1) The rifle balances perfectly WITH the 16 oz. kickstop. It does not without it.​
2) The additional 1 lbs. absorbs recoil. This may come in handy in some awkward field shooting positions.​
3) I personally shoot better rifles that have a little heft.​
4) I am utterly incapable of differentiating a 10.5 lbs. rifle from a 9.5 lbs. rifle on my shoulder.​
I reckon that you can shave 1 lbs. without the kickstop and 1/2 lbs. with a lighter scope. This would make the scoped rifle about 9 lbs. even. Too light for my taste in .300 Wby or .375 H&H, and it would loose its balance, but to each their own :)

View attachment 377374
The Blaser R8 balances beautifully with the 16 oz. kickstop installed. It is barrel heavy without the kickstop...
i also found my blasers to be "front heavy" but after installing kickstop in the stock the balance is perfect!!!
 

BeeMaa

AH legend
Joined
Jun 11, 2017
Messages
2,687
Reaction score
4,221
Location
Eastern US
Media
98
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
NRA Life Member, SCI
Hunted
Eastern US & RSA
i also found my blasers to be "front heavy" but after installing kickstop in the stock the balance is perfect!!!
My wife and I found exactly the same thing.
We each have kickstops installed.
Both balance perfectly in front of the trigger.
 

bowjijohn

AH senior member
Joined
Oct 27, 2020
Messages
54
Reaction score
142
Media
2
Articles
1
Daft question

How do you get the rear pad off the stock - it looks to be glued on mine and I'm loath to take a screw driver or knife to it in ignorance
 

BeeMaa

AH legend
Joined
Jun 11, 2017
Messages
2,687
Reaction score
4,221
Location
Eastern US
Media
98
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
NRA Life Member, SCI
Hunted
Eastern US & RSA
Daft question

How do you get the rear pad off the stock - it looks to be glued on mine and I'm loath to take a screw driver or knife to it in ignorance
You need to look very closely.
There are two screw holes in the rubber recoil pad.
Exactly where they are on other rifles, but concealed much better.
There are two possible kinds of screw heads.
Both of ours were a Philips head.
I've heard of others having to use a Torx bit...not sure what size.
Put a little lube on the screwdriver shaft and the butt pad.
It keeps the rubber from grabbing the shaft and twisting.
They should back out with no problems.

Man, I just re-read my post...sounds dirty.
 

Newby

AH veteran
Joined
Oct 22, 2019
Messages
130
Reaction score
235
Location
Australia
Hunted
Australia, New Zealand, North America, UK, Central Asia
@BeeMaa and @oneday
Between the 2 of you you have almost converted me to the R8 if it wasn't for the fact that in Australia it would set me back $14,000 or more for a rifle, 2 scope mounts ,2 scopes and 2 barrels. Rifle with one barrel is 8 grand plus, scope mounts 870 bucks each, 2 scopes God knows and 2nd barrel 1,800 bucks.
If I could afford it I would love a K95 Blaser in 35 Whelen, my 25 wild cat and 22 hornet. Now that would be sweet.
Bob
Either I have misunderstood you, or your A$ prices are out of whack, Bob.
A basic R8 Professional, complete with barrel, is way under $8k, even after the price rises of the last twelve months. Not sure about spare barrels, but your figure of $1800 for standard calibre (IE not magnum) barrel, with no bolt head, should be less than that. Magnum cals carry a premium (because we can ??)
Whichever way you look at it they are not cheap, but the $$$$ pain is less than you think.
It can be difficult to to get accurate info here as we have a new importer still learning the brand, and only a small number of dealers who are fully familiar with the ins and outs of the brand. There are some other excellent dealers on board who are still finding their way around the brand.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
36,105
Messages
679,549
Members
62,224
Latest member
wanmeitong1
 

 

 

Latest profile posts

raamw wrote on AfricaHunting.com's profile.
Can you advise me to properly post pix, sometimes I get it right sometimes not
Tokoloshe Safaris wrote on Milan's profile.
I do not know where this video was posted, but I would very much like to see it.
Al Burke wrote on Milan's profile.
Hello Milan, I just watched your video on disassembling/reassembling the CZ 550. I have spent days looking for something like this. I now have no reservations taking apart my rifle. I like to do this with all my guns so I understand them "inside and out". Thank you very much for the information. It is greatly appreciated.
Al
Fred Gunner wrote on Viral_SIGness's profile.
60 375 Ruger Brass
$75+$8.30 Priority Mail Shipping
Postal Money Order Or Certified Tellers Check.

for final confirmation
Fred Gunner wrote on Viral_SIGness's profile.
60 375 Ruger Brass
$75+$8.30 Priority Mail Shipping
Postal Money Order Or Certified Tellers Check.

for final confirmation
 
Top