Transitioning To A Blaser R8 - A Two Months / 500 Rounds Review

One Day...

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Transitioning to a Blaser R8 - A two months / 500 rounds review series of articles

So, the deed is done, I have purchased a Blaser R8 and 4 barrels.

This came as a shock to some friends on AH.com who know me to be a fervent advocate of the CZ 550 as the best value in the affordable DG rifle market, and as a bomb-proof rifle after a bit of debugging…

I am not recanting!

After two months and 500 rounds with the Blaser R8, I would like to share some thoughts with those who, like me, have been on the fence regarding the R8:
  1. First, I want to thank AH members Red Leg, dchamp, BeeMaa, Opposite Pole, Philip Glass, Tally-Ho Hunting Safaris, Ed Lally, Von S., MMAL, Tra3, K-man, and others for their writing on AH.com. These influenced me greatly. I owe a special debt of gratitude to Red Leg and dchamp who answered tirelessly a number of personal messages with endless questions.
  2. Second, I will say without hesitation that in the short two months / 500 rounds I have had it, the R8 has become my favorite rifle, bar none. Yes I still like my upgraded CZ 550s, Steyr Mannlicher Luxus, Mausers 98 and 66, Winchester 70s, etc. but the R8 is in a different league. I will explain why in the coming posts...
  3. Third, and this may be the more valuable part for those who, like me, have been on the fence regarding the R8: I regret not having done it sooner, and I likely wasted money not doing it, so I really recommend that folks consider the R8 in priority if they are building or upgrading an African rifles battery. I will explain why in the coming posts...

Blaser R8 .223 Rem .257 Wby .300 Wby .375 H&H.jpg

Blaser R8 with 4 barrels: .223 Rem for practice; .257 Wby for small and medium PG and mountains game; .300 Wby for large PG; .375 H&H for carnivorous DG and one-rifle safaris. Admittedly, I still prefer a double .470 for herbivorous DG, but a fifth barrel in 416 Rem or .458 Win/Lott would do just fine.
 
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K-man

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Transitioning to a Blaser R8 - A two months / 500 rounds review series of articles

So, the deed is done, I have purchased a Blaser R8 and 4 barrels.

This came as a shock to some friends on AH.com who know me to be a fervent advocate of the CZ 550 as the best value in the affordable DG rifle market, and as a bomb-proof rifle after a bit of debugging…

I am not recanting!

After two months and 500 rounds with the Blaser R8, I would like to share some thoughts with those who, like me, have been on the fence regarding the R8:
  1. First, I want to thank AH members Red Leg, dchamp, BeeMaa, Opposite Pole, Philip Glass, Tally-Ho Hunting Safaris, Ed Lally, Von S., MMAL, Tra3 and others for their writing on AH.com. These influenced me greatly. I owe a special debt of gratitude to Red Leg and dchamp who answered tirelessly a number of personal messages with endless questions.
  2. Second, I will say without hesitation that in the short two months / 500 rounds I have had it, the R8 has become my favorite rifle, bar none. Yes I still like my upgraded CZ 550s, Steyr Mannlicher Luxus, Mausers 98 and 66, Winchester 70s, etc. but the R8 is in a different league. I will explain why in the coming posts...
  3. Third, and this may be the more valuable part for those who, like me, have been on the fence regarding the R8, I regret not to have done it sooner, and I really recommend that folks consider the R8 in priority if they are building or upgrading an African rifles battery. I will explain why in the coming posts...

View attachment 377294
Blaser R8 with 4 barrels: .223 Rem for practice; .257 Wby for small and medium PG; .300 Wby for large PG; .375 H&H for carnivorous DG and one-rifle safaris. Admittedly, I still prefer a double .470 for herbivorous DG, but a .416 Rem or a .458 Lott R8 barrel would do just fine.
You are now one of us.... one of us..... one of us! That is a nice all-around battery and now you just "need" a .416 or similar unless you take a double along. I agree I should have done mine sooner, I now have several rifles that may become safe queens.
 

One Day...

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The reasons to buy a Blaser R8 that left me cold... until I realized...

Trigger –
Yes, truly, the Blaser R8 has a great trigger. But it is no better than the Timney triggers on my rifles, adjusted to similar length and weight of pull. So, the R8 trigger argument never really resonated with me, as I never saw it as a unique characteristic...

Accuracy Yes, Blaser R8 have a reputation for shooting sub-MOA with about any factory barrel you care to mount. But I also have many rifles that shoot sub-MOA with their favorite load. Truth be told, it is a rare modern production rifle that does not shoot 1” groups at 100 yards with at least one load in the hands of a competent shooter. So, the R8 accuracy argument never really resonated with me, as I never saw it as a unique characteristic...

In line action – I see in line actions as an interesting engineering solution. To me the locking mechanism is different, not necessarily better or worse.

Speed of repetition – Yes, there are less motions in repeating a R8 than a turn bolt. It DOES make repetition a fraction of a second faster for well-practiced shooters. Will this make a difference in the field? Based on a few boxes of ammo through a friend's R8, I initially did not think so. After 500 rounds, I believe it may very well make a difference.

Ergonomics – Yes, a Blaser R8 has great ergonomics, but so do a great many rifles for shooters blessed with an “average man” body. So, the R8 ergonomics argument never really resonated with me... until now (see here under)...

Take down capability - Yes, a R8 is easy to take down. But traditional barreled actions mounted on synthetic stocks with aluminum bedding blocks are also easy to take down... then you realize that on a R8 there is no messing up with floor plate, magazine box, spring-loaded follower, etc.

Scope QD repeatability – Yes, scopes return to zero on a R8. But Talley rings also return to zero with 1 MOA or less on a double square bridge with integral scope bases...


As the title of this post implies, all these reasons to buy a R8 left me cold, until I realized:

Ergonomics can only be compared with rifles in hand


Case in point, I always found that the CZ 550 has great ergonomics with the Bell & Carlson kevlar stock. And it does. It was not until I shot the R8 and the CZ 550 side by side, that I realized that the R8 ergonomics are better. I now personally believe that the R8 stock is better designed, with only 1/4" drop at the heel below the bore axis, and with a flat comb. In comparison, the CZ 550 B&C stock drops 1" at the heel and has a sloping comb. Does it make a difference? Yes. To my initial astonishment, until I measured the stocks, the 10 lbs. 7 oz. .300 Wby R8 has significantly less perceived recoil than the 11 lbs. 4 oz. .300 Wby CZ 550.

Blaser stock drop.jpg

Blaser R8 stock: 1/4" drop at the heel below bore axis + flat comb = lower perceived recoil despite almost 1 lbs. lighter rifle.

CZ stock drop.jpg

CZ 550 stock: 1" drop at the heel below bore axis + sloping comb = higher perceived recoil despite almost 1 lbs. heavier rifle.

Scope QD mounts repeatability

Sure all QD mounts are sold as reliably repetitive. And this is generally true for the best of them (Talley, Warnes, Alaska Arms, EAW, etc.) ... within tolerances.

In the two following tests, I verified both the Zeiss scopes clicks reliability AND the Blaser mount repeatability. I removed and re-attached the scopes before the first shot, and between each of the following shots, in addition to clicking up, left, down, and right 16 clicks. Before you lick the stamps on the hate mail to comment on the lack of 1/4 MOA accuracy, let me say that these were not shot from a bench, but standing up off the sticks at 100 yards, and notice that all the shots are within 1" of expected point of impact. Good enough for me...

PS: I am sure the rifle will do better from a bench, but since I never encountered a bench in the bush in Africa, I prefer to shoot standing off the sticks after the rifles are sighted. This repeatability and accuracy is good enough for me to go hunting confidently...
Blaser .257 Wby 100 gr TTSX - Scope removal & clicks test.jpg

"Walking the box" with the R8 .257 Wby at 100 yards, removing and re-attaching the scope before the first shot and between each of the following shots. Standing off the stick at 100 yards.

Blaser .300 Wby 165 gr TTSX - Scope removal & clicks test.jpg

"Walking the box" with the R8 .300 Wby at 100 yards, removing and re-attaching the scope before the first shot and between each of the following shots. Standing off the stick at 100 yards.

Trigger, accuracy, ergonomic, take down capability, s
cope QD repeatability, etc. all included from the factory...

Yes, I have good Timney triggers on my other rifles... but they did not come from the factory. I had to upgrade them...

Yes, all my rifles shoot 1 MOA with their favorite load... but my 4 Blaser barrels all shoot sub-MOA with, so far, ALL the loads I put through them: from plinking 55 gr American Eagle bulk and Federal Gold match 75 gr .223 Rem; through .257 Wby "silver box" 100 gr Hornady Interlock and "gold box" 100 gr TTSX factory loads; through .300 Wby "silver box" 165 gr Hornady Interlock and "gold box" 165 gr TTSX, as well as both 150 gr and 180 gr "gold box" Nosler Partition factory loads; to .375 H&H Barnes 300 gr TSX and Federal Premium 300 gr Nosler Partition factory loads. This never happened to me before...

Yes, there are good aftermarket stocks out there, but as the words imply, they too generally do not come from the factory (although I salute Weatherby, Winchester, and a few others for having seen the light and using B&C kevlar / aluminum bedding block stocks on their better grade rifles).

But what I did not realize until recently (duuuhhh!), is that a Blaser R8 is an "all of the above" purchase. I am not aware of so many best-in-class characteristics factory-standard in any other mass or limited production rifle. Sure, the R8 is a little more expensive than others (more to come!) but you need not consider a $900 AHR Upgrade, $130 Timney trigger, $285 B&C stock, $150 bedding job, $200 accurizing job, etc. it is already all there...
 
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One Day...

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The reasons NOT to buy a R8 that left me cold…

No Mauser claw extractor –
I am on record for observing that one of the reasons CRF and its characteristic big external claw extractor were perfected in the 1890’s by Paul Mauser, at the request of the German Imperial Army, was to prevent extraction failure of the pure copper shells loaded with black powder, that were notorious for sticking in dirty chambers after sustained fire. I reckon that brass shells loaded with smokeless powder resolved this issue a long time ago. If a case gets stuck nowadays, Mauser claw extractor or not, the action itself is stuck, short of a rubber mallet.

I do not mourn a Mauser claw extractor on the R8...

No extraction camming power - When a turn bolt handle is lifted, an angled camming surface typically engages either against a lump inside the rear bridge, or against the rear bridge rear face, to converts some of the lift force of opening the bolt into a rearward force, therefore an extraction force.

1605390447970.png

CZ 550 extraction camming power.

Straight pull actions by definition do not have a rotational bolt handle movement, hence no extraction camming power. The only extraction power is that of the shooter pulling on the bolt. Because in a straight pull rifle the shooter's pulling force is not leveraged against the action by a camming surface, it provides less extraction force. Admittedly, this is not an issue until a case gets stuck into the chamber.

As noted above, if a case gets stuck nowadays, it is most likely that, extraction camming power or not, the action itself is stuck, short of a rubber mallet. My own experience with a Remington Defense .300 Win rifle in which the shells of the Black Hills 190 gr match factory loads stuck, was that it was impossible to open the action in the field, despite the cam on the bolt handle.

I do not mourn extraction camming power on the R8...

No CRF feeding – I am on record for observing that the other reason CRF was perfected was to prevent 1890’s peasant conscripts who had never handled a bolt action rifle before, to jam the rifle by double feeding and risk detonating the cartridge in the chamber with the tip of the spitzer bullet of the cartridge being rammed into it; or to load the rifle inadvertently by pushing a cartridge in the chamber and leaving it there.

I continue to appreciate the fact that in a true Mauser CRF rifle it is impossible to close the bolt on a cartridge inadvertently pushed in the chamber - and I only wish that no CRF extractor would be beveled to allow it to jump the rim of a cartridge already pushed into the chamber, as some manufacturers do. This would make it impossible to load a CRF rifle inadvertently, and to fire it accidentally.

Can one close a R8 action on a cartridge inadvertently present in the chamber? Yes. Is this an accident waiting to happen? My answer is that a R8 decocks automatically when the trigger group/magazine is removed to load it, and that a decocked R8 cannot fire. From the perspective of accidental loading and discharge, I therefore judge the R8 to be as safe as a CRF rifle…

PS: This is being said knowing full well that ultimately there is no preventing stupid, and that the main safety resides between the handler's ears, with the basic premise of pointing the muzzle in a safe direction during handling...
 
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mark-hunter

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Dear @One Day...
This is an excellent overview, in fact, probably the best overview I have ever read on Blaser R8, together with comparing notes to some of CRF characteristics (like camming extraction force of mauser bolt).
I am saying this based on my extensive library of magazines or books from most famous gun writing authors, and much more modest personal experience

I dont have R8, just because I have a preference towards turnbolts, and in my rifle inventory having push feeds, CRF actions, or "modernised clawless" CRF actions, such as Sako 85. But that is just as subjective choice, as subjective can be, only my personal preference.

Now, after you mentioned mauser systems being proven popular and reliable for last hundred years, my only factual observation is that while m98 system is classic by now, blaser systems are modern, and re-invented continously, phasing out older solutions.
Examples can be found in either Double rifle S2, or older model r93, both phased out.

So, my guess with such policy m98 (and clones) will remain classic for times to come, while blaser solutions will keep design upgrades, always having a halo of modern and fashionable. (this will also define their respective markets).

In any case, I thank you for excellent writing, and time spent to share your experience with us!
I look forward to your next buffalo report with that blaser!!!!
 

One Day...

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The reasons NOT to buy a R8 with which I initially struggled… until I realized I was misguided...

Weight -
A lot has been written about the R8 light weight. I was concerned about this because I do not like to be pounded by recoil, and a 7 lbs. 6 oz. .300 or .375 R8 had no appeal to me whatsoever.

There are indeed super-light rifles in big calibers that weigh 7 lbs. scoped. The .338 Win 6 lbs. model 28 Ultimate Alaskan Rifle form Ultra Light Arms comes to mind. I was therefore under the impression that the R8 was 7 lbs. 6 oz. scoped.

This is not the case.

My scoped unloaded R8 rifles weigh on a certified scale: .375 H&H: 9.3 lbs.; .300 Wby: 9.7 lbs.; 257 Wby: 9.9 lbs.; .223 Rem: 9.3 lbs. If you add the 12 oz. kickstop that I selected to install in order to perfect the balance of the rifle (more about this later), the weights are .375 H&H: 10.3 lbs.; .300 Wby: 10.7 lbs.

This works perfectly for me.

Price - I was told by a nationally recognized dealer that any caliber equal to or above .375 H&H in recoil, requires a steel receiver. Since I wanted a barrel in .300 Wby, which has a faster recoil than a .375 H&H, and I wanted a .375 H&H barrel, I was under the impression that I needed a steel receiver.

This is not the case.

Based on discussions directly with Blaser USA and Blaser Germany, any caliber can be shot from an alloy receiver, they have the same strength as a steel receiver. The steel receiver only adds weight (approximately 19 oz.) for those who want it.

This was the fundamental turning point for me.

I am on record for criticizing sharply Blaser and their dealers for selling the steel receiver Pro stock for 3x more money ($4,500) than the alloy receiver Pro stock ($1,500). There is no manufacturing reason why the steel receiver stock should cost 3x more than the alloy receiver stock. I said that in my view this marketing decision is taking advantage of the Safari-going clients group - perceived to be wealthy I guess - and I refused, and continue to refuse, to be taken advantage of, and to pay 3x as much for a steel receiver stock. Call this misplaced pride…

But once I realized that there is no NEED for a steel receiver from a mechanical strength perspective, this changed the entire paradigm for me…

In so many words, one does not NEED to pay $7,500 for a R8 .375 H&H (steel receiver). In the US, the R8 is available in any caliber for as low as $3,300 (Cove Creek) to typically $3,700 (EuroOptic) in any caliber.

I was not in the market for a $7,500 synthetic stock R8, I was a happy buyer at $3,000 (Cove Creek price when I ordered in August 2020).

Yes, a factory CZ 550 is less expensive ($1,200) but by the time you add the basics: AHR Upgrade #1 ($900), barrel band front swivel ($200), and Bell & Carlson kevlar stock with aluminum bedding block ($300), you have committed $2,600 and you are within reaching distance of a R8 (alloy receiver).

But you still do not benefit from one of the main advantages of the R8...
 
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One Day...

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The first main reason why I bought a Blaser R8...

The first main reason why I bought a Blaser R8 is best illustrated by these two pictures:

CZ 550 + Krieghoff Big Five = 2 calibers to Africa in a rifle case <50 lbs. and <62" linear...

Pelican 1700 with CZ 550 300 Wby & Krieghoff ,470 NE.jpg


Blaser R8 + Krieghoff Big Five = 3 calibers to Africa in a rifle case <50 lbs. and <62" linear...

Pelican 1700 with Krieghoff .470 + Blaser R8 & 2 barrels.jpg


If both Vaal Rhebok, Mountain Reedbuck and Buffalo are on the package, which they always are for me in South Africa, plus anything in between, the classic 3 rifles battery really makes sense. The same logic will hold in Tanzania with Grant, Thomson, Puku, Gerenuk and Elephant.

Light rifle - The .257 Wby 100 gr TTSX is absolutely devastating on all small & medium PG and likely one of the very best for mountain hunting (Vaal Rhebok, Mountain Reedbuck, Mountain Nyala, etc. as well as Himalayan Tahr, European Chamois, American Mountain Goat, etc.) and it shoots laser flat out to 400 yards with barely any recoil to notice (equivalent .270 Win) which makes it extremely easy to shoot well.

And for a dedicated Tiny Ten hunt, I expect that the .223 Rem barrel will be perfect, although practice is the main reason why I bought it (more to come on this...).

Medium rifle - Two options, depending on the hunt:
  • The .300 Wby is by a large consensus the best .300 there is when combining reach, power, and ammo availability. It does everything with a modern 165 gr TTSX or a more traditional 180 gr Partition, and hits a tremendous blow with a 200 gr AFrame. You can replace the .300 Wby with a .300 Win if you prefer. Either are needlessly powerful for small and medium PG species, but shine on the larger ones (Kudu, Wildebeest, etc. as well as European or New Zealand Red Deer, American Elk, etc.).
  • The .375 H&H satisfies all minimum legal requirements for DG and has done it all for over 100 years. It is certainly not ideal for climbing mountains after Vaal Rhebok, or stopping a charging Buffalo, but it can do both in a pinch. It is perfect with a 300 gr TSX or AFrame on Lion, undisturbed Buffalo, Eland, etc. and on Leopard too with a quick-opening bullet like the 250 gr TTSX.
Heavy rifle - There is no question that a .416 Rem or .458 Lott barrel for the R8 would do just fine, but to me the double .470 NE is likely the quintessential rifle for elephant, buffalo - and we might as well add hippo on land - up close & personal in thick bush or Jesse. In addition, to me a true DG rifle should also be a "stopper," and while the .375 is a great killer, it is admittedly on the light side as a charge stopper.

Sure, the .375 H&H could do it all, but the .257 Wby is such a sweet, easy to shoot, and devastatedly efficient caliber, and the .470 NE double is so much the "proper" rifle to hunt Buff and Ele, that what is a man to do :)

With the Krieghoff Big Five double and the Blaser R8 with two barrels I do not have the room to put their two scopes in the Pelican 1700, but this is really not an issue, I have plenty of room and weight allowance to put them in my other Pelican, a 1615 Air suitcase. And with a grand total of 41 lbs. (well below the maximum 50 lbs. allowed) and 60.25" linear cumulated dimension L+W+D (well below the maximum 62" allowed) the Pelican 1700 is really ideal, not to mention so much easier to schlep through the airports, and put in a vehicle, than the full length Pelican 1750...


To the best of my knowledge, there is simply no other way than a R8 (or similar) to bring 3 calibers to Africa, within the maximum weight (50 lbs.) and the maximum linear size (62") allowed by the airlines.

Yes, I know, many are taking the gamble with oversized and overweight rifle cases, and it has worked for a long time, but it is, in my opinion, only a question of time before the airlines realize the additional revenue opportunity they miss by not charging for excess size and weight. Assuming ~$100 per flight, for me this would be a total of $600 (3 flights each way). I can think of better ways to spend $600...
 
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As I’m the owner of an R8 pro success with an alloy receiver, the absolute gem I’ve gleaned from your extensive research and excellent article is that ...

I can run a 458 Lott (with the 16 oz kickstop) on my existing platform without excess damage to receiver or wallet

the shoulder will just have to put up with it

many thanks for a superb report
 

sierraone

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I don't own a Blaser R8, but this is an excellent write up on the advantages of the R8 over most (maybe all) other hunting rifles. You may need to find a second job as a Blaser salesman!
 

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@One Day...
You have become quite the convert.
And have put into words many of the feelings I have for the R8.
Welcome to the fold.
 

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Well written indeed. I am not a convert but I have a tremendous amount of respect for the R8. I am too heavily invested in conventional platforms to convert now.

One thing has me curious. When I pick up an R8 I immediately try to lift the bolt handle. I know I’m not the sharpest knife in the drawer and I feel that I would have trouble switching between turn bolt and straight pull. Do you find this to be an issue?
 

mikecatt13

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I didnt log on here for a bit after covid required my 2020 safari to be rescheduled like many were.

Would not have guessed this would happen haha

Glad you like it and welcome to the club!
 

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Well written indeed. I am not a convert but I have a tremendous amount of respect for the R8. I am too heavily invested in conventional platforms to convert now.

One thing has me curious. When I pick up an R8 I immediately try to lift the bolt handle. I know I’m not the sharpest knife in the drawer and I feel that I would have trouble switching between turn bolt and straight pull. Do you find this to be an issue?
When I first took my R8 to the range with a friend...
I'd shot about 10 rounds of 300WM from the R8.
My friend had his MK4 in 303BRIT.
We switched rifles and I tried to work the MK4 like the R8.
Took me a few seconds to realize it was a traditional bolt.
So I was converted in about 10 rounds of live fire.
Although I had done about 100 rounds of dry fire prior to this.

In a "hunting scenario" and with no prior practice...
I'd most likely have trouble with a traditional bolt.
My muscle memory is much more in favor of the R8.
However, I'm sure this could be overcome with a little practice.
 

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Well written indeed. I am not a convert but I have a tremendous amount of respect for the R8. I am too heavily invested in conventional platforms to convert now.

One thing has me curious. When I pick up an R8 I immediately try to lift the bolt handle. I know I’m not the sharpest knife in the drawer and I feel that I would have trouble switching between turn bolt and straight pull. Do you find this to be an issue?
It is a lot like using double triggers. After a remarkably short time, you don't even consciously realize which you are using.
 

mikecatt13

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Well written indeed. I am not a convert but I have a tremendous amount of respect for the R8. I am too heavily invested in conventional platforms to convert now.

One thing has me curious. When I pick up an R8 I immediately try to lift the bolt handle. I know I’m not the sharpest knife in the drawer and I feel that I would have trouble switching between turn bolt and straight pull. Do you find this to be an issue?
Personally, I dont think you would have any trouble. It's going to vary person to person but with even marginal amounts of practice youd be fine if you switch.

Now, if you were to try and mix straight pull with turn bolt, that could give certain people, maybe even most, trouble possibly. But focusing on one, you'll be fine
 

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Transitioning to a Blaser R8 - A two months / 500 rounds review series of articles

So, the deed is done, I have purchased a Blaser R8 and 4 barrels.

This came as a shock to some friends on AH.com who know me to be a fervent advocate of the CZ 550 as the best value in the affordable DG rifle market, and as a bomb-proof rifle after a bit of debugging…

I am not recanting!

After two months and 500 rounds with the Blaser R8, I would like to share some thoughts with those who, like me, have been on the fence regarding the R8:
  1. First, I want to thank AH members Red Leg, dchamp, BeeMaa, Opposite Pole, Philip Glass, Tally-Ho Hunting Safaris, Ed Lally, Von S., MMAL, Tra3, K-man, and others for their writing on AH.com. These influenced me greatly. I owe a special debt of gratitude to Red Leg and dchamp who answered tirelessly a number of personal messages with endless questions.
  2. Second, I will say without hesitation that in the short two months / 500 rounds I have had it, the R8 has become my favorite rifle, bar none. Yes I still like my upgraded CZ 550s, Steyr Mannlicher Luxus, Mausers 98 and 66, Winchester 70s, etc. but the R8 is in a different league. I will explain why in the coming posts...
  3. Third, and this may be the more valuable part for those who, like me, have been on the fence regarding the R8: I regret not having done it sooner, and I likely wasted money not doing it, so I really recommend that folks consider the R8 in priority if they are building or upgrading an African rifles battery. I will explain why in the coming posts...

View attachment 377294
Blaser R8 with 4 barrels: .223 Rem for practice; .257 Wby for small and medium PG and mountains game; .300 Wby for large PG; .375 H&H for carnivorous DG and one-rifle safaris. Admittedly, I still prefer a double .470 for herbivorous DG, but a fifth barrel in 416 Rem or .458 Win/Lott would do just fine.
Was looking at their Jaeger 500 Jeff
 

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Great write up One Day. The R8 is going to be one of my next rifle purchases. I have been enamored with the Blaser system ever since I first laid eyes and hands on one back in 2004 (R93). Handling an R8 at SCI 2017 and at NRA 2019, I was hooked.
Your critique just solidified my choice.
 

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Owner of Backcountry Africa - Outfitter operating in Zambia and Zimbabwe - Specialising in Bowhunting.
Tokoloshe Safaris wrote on Milan's profile.
I do not know where this video was posted, but I would very much like to see it.
Al Burke wrote on Milan's profile.
Hello Milan, I just watched your video on disassembling/reassembling the CZ 550. I have spent days looking for something like this. I now have no reservations taking apart my rifle. I like to do this with all my guns so I understand them "inside and out". Thank you very much for the information. It is greatly appreciated.
Al
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60 375 Ruger Brass
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Fred Gunner wrote on Viral_SIGness's profile.
60 375 Ruger Brass
$75+$8.30 Priority Mail Shipping
Postal Money Order Or Certified Tellers Check.

for final confirmation
 
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