What Watch do you wear when you hunt?

Chago

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Allright. Earlier I posted that I wear a Timex Expedition while hunting. And since I've been shamed by all the Rolexes, Omegas, Breitlings, Tags, etc. So from now on, I will be wearing my "dress watch" on all further hunts.

Herewith, on the same lion's head as before:

View attachment 352685

Pppffff I remember my first watch...... Hahahaha

That is an incredible piece. Congratulations for even owning something like that.
 

Red Leg

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Allright. Earlier I posted that I wear a Timex Expedition while hunting. And since I've been shamed by all the Rolexes, Omegas, Breitlings, Tags, etc. So from now on, I will be wearing my "dress watch" on all further hunts.

Herewith, on the same lion's head as before:

View attachment 352685
That is a watch. Rather like a golden age Holland & Holland Royal - at least a Westley Richards.
 
Last edited:

BeeMaa

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I've never looked up so many different watches...
Very interesting to see what everyone is wearing.
 

Hank2211

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Pppffff I remember my first watch...... Hahahaha

That is an incredible piece. Congratulations for even owning something like that.

Like some others (who knew so many on AH felt the same way?!), I became fascinated by mechanical watches at a young age. As I got older, and mechanical watches went from being the only kind of watch out there (I also have a Timex Marlin from about 1966 which is mechanical (though not automatic) and cost not much back then) to rarities, their cost went up to the point where they became more of a dream than a reality.

And then along the way, I worked hard and got a bit lucky, and once the kids were through school and we were a bit more comfortable . . . I found my appreciation for things made by obsessive craftsmen had only increased. And if you're looking for a watch you never have to wonder about . . . Patek is probably at the top of the heap. No regrets. And unlike much of what we all buy today, I could likely resell it tomorrow if I had to and would do OK on the deal.

Speaking of obsessive, Patek Phillipe makes a perpetual calendar watch, as do some others. Many perpetual calendars require adjustment for leap years, although the good ones don't. However, there's an added complication (pun intended) - of course, every one hundred years, the fourth year is not a leap year, so virtually all perpetual calendar watches need manual adjustment at least once every one hundred years. I am told Patek once made a perpetual calendar watch (it might have been the "Graves" watch) which did not need this adjustment, because it knew that once every century, a year which would otherwise be a leap year wasn't.

But nothing is simple, and time is no exception. That rule holds, except that every fourth century (that is, every 400 years), the hundredth year is a leap year. And on that year, that watch needs adjustment.

Obsessive? How about a (tiny) gear in a watch that makes a complete rotation every four hundred years? Not even the government can move that slowly!
 

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Like some others (who knew so many on AH felt the same way?!), I became fascinated by mechanical watches at a young age. As I got older, and mechanical watches went from being the only kind of watch out there (I also have a Timex Marlin from about 1966 which is mechanical (though not automatic) and cost not much back then) to rarities, their cost went up to the point where they became more of a dream than a reality.

And then along the way, I worked hard and got a bit lucky, and once the kids were through school and we were a bit more comfortable . . . I found my appreciation for things made by obsessive craftsmen had only increased. And if you're looking for a watch you never have to wonder about . . . Patek is probably at the top of the heap. No regrets. And unlike much of what we all buy today, I could likely resell it tomorrow if I had to and would do OK on the deal.

Speaking of obsessive, Patek Phillipe makes a perpetual calendar watch, as do some others. Many perpetual calendars require adjustment for leap years, although the good ones don't. However, there's an added complication (pun intended) - of course, every one hundred years, the fourth year is not a leap year, so virtually all perpetual calendar watches need manual adjustment at least once every one hundred years. I am told Patek once made a perpetual calendar watch (it might have been the "Graves" watch) which did not need this adjustment, because it knew that once every century, a year which would otherwise be a leap year wasn't.

But nothing is simple, and time is no exception. That rule holds, except that every fourth century (that is, every 400 years), the hundredth year is a leap year. And on that year, that watch needs adjustment.

Obsessive? How about a (tiny) gear in a watch that makes a complete rotation every four hundred years? Not even the government can move that slowly!
Made by the same sorts of gifted, obsessive craftsmen who hand filed and fitted SxS actions to the the tolerence of smoke.
 

Alistair

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Like some others (who knew so many on AH felt the same way?!), I became fascinated by mechanical watches at a young age. As I got older, and mechanical watches went from being the only kind of watch out there (I also have a Timex Marlin from about 1966 which is mechanical (though not automatic) and cost not much back then) to rarities, their cost went up to the point where they became more of a dream than a reality.

And then along the way, I worked hard and got a bit lucky, and once the kids were through school and we were a bit more comfortable . . . I found my appreciation for things made by obsessive craftsmen had only increased. And if you're looking for a watch you never have to wonder about . . . Patek is probably at the top of the heap. No regrets. And unlike much of what we all buy today, I could likely resell it tomorrow if I had to and would do OK on the deal.

Speaking of obsessive, Patek Phillipe makes a perpetual calendar watch, as do some others. Many perpetual calendars require adjustment for leap years, although the good ones don't. However, there's an added complication (pun intended) - of course, every one hundred years, the fourth year is not a leap year, so virtually all perpetual calendar watches need manual adjustment at least once every one hundred years. I am told Patek once made a perpetual calendar watch (it might have been the "Graves" watch) which did not need this adjustment, because it knew that once every century, a year which would otherwise be a leap year wasn't.

But nothing is simple, and time is no exception. That rule holds, except that every fourth century (that is, every 400 years), the hundredth year is a leap year. And on that year, that watch needs adjustment.

Obsessive? How about a (tiny) gear in a watch that makes a complete rotation every four hundred years? Not even the government can move that slowly!

Pateks are truly beautiful things to behold.

My uncle on my mothers side has one, this model to be precise: https://www.patek.com/en/collection/grand-complications/5327R-001

Now unfortunately, he also has children. Fortunately though, they're both female and have no interest in watches. I'm not saying this will one day be mine, but it's also fair to say that I try to be as helpful and friendly as possible to my dear Uncle Steve!

Al.
 

Chago

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Like some others (who knew so many on AH felt the same way?!), I became fascinated by mechanical watches at a young age. As I got older, and mechanical watches went from being the only kind of watch out there (I also have a Timex Marlin from about 1966 which is mechanical (though not automatic) and cost not much back then) to rarities, their cost went up to the point where they became more of a dream than a reality.

And then along the way, I worked hard and got a bit lucky, and once the kids were through school and we were a bit more comfortable . . . I found my appreciation for things made by obsessive craftsmen had only increased. And if you're looking for a watch you never have to wonder about . . . Patek is probably at the top of the heap. No regrets. And unlike much of what we all buy today, I could likely resell it tomorrow if I had to and would do OK on the deal.

Speaking of obsessive, Patek Phillipe makes a perpetual calendar watch, as do some others. Many perpetual calendars require adjustment for leap years, although the good ones don't. However, there's an added complication (pun intended) - of course, every one hundred years, the fourth year is not a leap year, so virtually all perpetual calendar watches need manual adjustment at least once every one hundred years. I am told Patek once made a perpetual calendar watch (it might have been the "Graves" watch) which did not need this adjustment, because it knew that once every century, a year which would otherwise be a leap year wasn't.

But nothing is simple, and time is no exception. That rule holds, except that every fourth century (that is, every 400 years), the hundredth year is a leap year. And on that year, that watch needs adjustment.

Obsessive? How about a (tiny) gear in a watch that makes a complete rotation every four hundred years? Not even the government can move that slowly!

I have read so many things on Patek. There are complications on some of their individual pieces that they never advertise and only tell the owner when they buy it. These watches are literally in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, some even creep into 7 figures. And as you said imagine the complexity of even making a gear that small or move that slowly. You would think that any modern lubricant even would stick as it's moving so slow it's almost not moving. Then to be accurate on top of that. Mind blowing. I don't excited about electronics. I couldn't give a flying f about how fast or smart a computer is or a piece of technology. But something mechanical that can do this. Is far more exciting to me.

Another similar topic would be comparing modern day laser guidance, gps guidance etc long range missiles. Leaving battle ships, striking miles and miles away. Sounds cool???? Great a computer does it all. What I'm more impressed and amazed at is WW2 or prior. When ships fired with nothing more then a protractor on the side of the weapon. Imagine with wavy seas, wind, Coriolis, etc. And to be able to hit target miles away. Off topic I know but I relate this to what makes these time pieces so amazing.
 

Chago

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I would have just landed a few hours ago at home after my safari if it wasn't for corona. I was scheduled to come home today. Instead I'll enjoy myself in the beautiful weather.
IMG_20200609_181220.jpg
 

Wheels

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I have read so many things on Patek. There are complications on some of their individual pieces that they never advertise and only tell the owner when they buy it. These watches are literally in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, some even creep into 7 figures. And as you said imagine the complexity of even making a gear that small or move that slowly. You would think that any modern lubricant even would stick as it's moving so slow it's almost not moving. Then to be accurate on top of that. Mind blowing. I don't excited about electronics. I couldn't give a flying f about how fast or smart a computer is or a piece of technology. But something mechanical that can do this. Is far more exciting to me.

Another similar topic would be comparing modern day laser guidance, gps guidance etc long range missiles. Leaving battle ships, striking miles and miles away. Sounds cool???? Great a computer does it all. What I'm more impressed and amazed at is WW2 or prior. When ships fired with nothing more then a protractor on the side of the weapon. Imagine with wavy seas, wind, Coriolis, etc. And to be able to hit target miles away. Off topic I know but I relate this to what makes these time pieces so amazing.


If you have never done it, and love mechanical time pieces, you might enjoy going to the Royal Observatory at Greenwich.

Determining longitude was a problem that had never been solved. Ships got lost at sea and fleets of ships crashed into rocks at night or in a storm. Everybody thought a star chart or lunar formula would solve the problem. John Harrison, a watch maker determined that longitude could be solved with an accurate time piece that would work even within a raging storm. He spent his life trying to make the perfect time piece. Harrison's multiple attempts are on display at the observatory. He was finally able to solve longitude.

https://www.rmg.co.uk/discover/explore/longitude-found-john-harrison

First attempt at solving longitude.


Final product.


d0789_1.jpg



This book tells the story if anybody is interested.

 

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Alistair

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If you have never done it, and love mechanical time pieces, you might enjoy going to the Royal Observatory at Greenwich.

Determining longitude was a problem that had never been solved. Ships got lost at sea and fleets of ships crashed into rocks at night or in a storm. Everybody thought a star chart or lunar formula would solve the problem. John Harrison, a watch maker determined that longitude could be solved with an accurate time piece that would work even within a raging storm. He spent his life trying to make the perfect time piece. Harrison's multiple attempts are on display at the observatory. He was finally able to solve longitude.

https://www.rmg.co.uk/discover/explore/longitude-found-john-harrison

First attempt at solving longitude.


Final product.





This book tells the story if anybody is interested.


The poor bloke never did get his £20,000 Naval Chronometer prize though. Cheap Lords of the Admiralty and Parliament swindled him out of most of it in the end.
 

Hank2211

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Obsessive . . .

Jaeger-LeCoultre makes a clock called Atmos . . . no batteries. The clock has a small cylinder in it that is sensitive to changes in temperature . . . and differences between day and night temperature cause the cylinder to expand and contract, which generates the power to keep the clock running . . . forever (not sure it's for those of you with air conditioning . . .).
 

sierraone

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Pateks are truly beautiful things to behold.

My uncle on my mothers side has one, this model to be precise: https://www.patek.com/en/collection/grand-complications/5327R-001

Now unfortunately, he also has children. Fortunately though, they're both female and have no interest in watches. I'm not saying this will one day be mine, but it's also fair to say that I try to be as helpful and friendly as possible to my dear Uncle Steve!

Al.
I almost bought a Patek Calatrava about 15 years ago when they they were going for $3000-$4000 used. Don't know what they go for now.
 

BeeMaa

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I almost bought a Patek Calatrava about 15 years ago when they they were going for $3000-$4000 used. Don't know what they go for now.
I wouldn't be Googling "Patek Calatrava"...
You will only find misery.
 

rinehart0050

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Like some others (who knew so many on AH felt the same way?!), I became fascinated by mechanical watches at a young age. As I got older, and mechanical watches went from being the only kind of watch out there (I also have a Timex Marlin from about 1966 which is mechanical (though not automatic) and cost not much back then) to rarities, their cost went up to the point where they became more of a dream than a reality.

And then along the way, I worked hard and got a bit lucky, and once the kids were through school and we were a bit more comfortable . . . I found my appreciation for things made by obsessive craftsmen had only increased. And if you're looking for a watch you never have to wonder about . . . Patek is probably at the top of the heap. No regrets. And unlike much of what we all buy today, I could likely resell it tomorrow if I had to and would do OK on the deal.

I too find myself afflicted with this passion for things made by expert craftsman. Fine watches, fine guns, fine books, fine trains, etc. These are expensive obsessions, but worth every penny.

Obsessive . . .

Jaeger-LeCoultre makes a clock called Atmos . . . no batteries. The clock has a small cylinder in it that is sensitive to changes in temperature . . . and differences between day and night temperature cause the cylinder to expand and contract, which generates the power to keep the clock running . . . forever (not sure it's for those of you with air conditioning . . .).

My parents have just such an Atmos clock that they inherited from my Grandfather in Germany when he passed. Transporting it to the USA required extremely specialized packing that stabilized the mechanism. I can report that it works even in buildings with air conditioning. My parents had the clock while they lived in Illinois and now live in Arizona- it tells excellent time, no complaints.

IMG-20200609-WA0000.jpg
 

rinehart0050

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If you have never done it, and love mechanical time pieces, you might enjoy going to the Royal Observatory at Greenwich.

Determining longitude was a problem that had never been solved. Ships got lost at sea and fleets of ships crashed into rocks at night or in a storm. Everybody thought a star chart or lunar formula would solve the problem. John Harrison, a watch maker determined that longitude could be solved with an accurate time piece that would work even within a raging storm. He spent his life trying to make the perfect time piece. Harrison's multiple attempts are on display at the observatory. He was finally able to solve longitude.

https://www.rmg.co.uk/discover/explore/longitude-found-john-harrison

First attempt at solving longitude.


Final product.





This book tells the story if anybody is interested.


Another great stop is the Vienna Watch Museum. Its right downtown and a great way to spend 1-2 hours while touring the city.

Exhibits include everything from the largest clocktower mechanisms to the smallest pocket watches.

csm_Turmuhrwerk_St_Stephan_25033f3244.jpg


https://www.wienmuseum.at/de/standorte/uhrenmuseum
 

40inarow

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I love mechanical watches. Bought a Rolex Datejust in 1983 and was my main watch for 30+ years. Along the way accumulated pre-Tag Heuer 2 dial chronograph, Fortis, Omega, Longines, Ocean7, Boschett just because I like them.

When hunting and traveling form follows function. My Casio G-Shock Mudmaster has night light, compass, thermometer, dual time, stopwatch, world time, alarm all which haved proved useful.

Regarding the discussion on different generations appreciating watches, my 35 year old son has a fantastic Omega Planet Ocean GMT and a Raymond Weil dress watch that is pure classic. My 30 year old son has so many watches I cannot keep up with him. Their friends also are buying some cool and some quite expensive watches so it is going on in that generation.

Watches, like guns, are just a lot of fun.
 

Hank2211

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I too find myself afflicted with this passion for things made by expert craftsman. Fine watches, fine guns, fine books, fine trains, etc. These are expensive obsessions, but worth every penny.

I agree that these passions can be expensive, but you get far more than just utility when you acquire products such as these. And of course, artisanal products are becoming ever rarer in today's world, where everyone is looking for the lowest price.

I was once sitting on a mountain in Ethiopia waiting for a mountain nyala to show up. I was talking to my PH and the subject got onto China (a big presence in Ethiopia (and elsewhere in Africa)) and I made some comment about poor quality. One of our guides, who I had assumed understood no English, was clearly listening to our conversation, as he said with a big grin: "China! Nice price, buy twice."

Could not have said it better myself.
 

Chago

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I agree that these passions can be expensive, but you get far more than just utility when you acquire products such as these. And of course, artisanal products are becoming ever rarer in today's world, where everyone is looking for the lowest price.

I was once sitting on a mountain in Ethiopia waiting for a mountain nyala to show up. I was talking to my PH and the subject got onto China (a big presence in Ethiopia (and elsewhere in Africa)) and I made some comment about poor quality. One of our guides, who I had assumed understood no English, was clearly listening to our conversation, as he said with a big grin: "China! Nice price, buy twice."

Could not have said it better myself.

Totally going to use that one
 

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