Sabatti Safari Double Rifle

Philip Glass

Lifetime bronze benefactor
AH legend
Joined
Feb 26, 2015
Messages
4,105
Reaction score
7,020
Location
Texas
Website
www.dorper.net
Media
86
Articles
13
Hunting reports
Africa
8
USA/Canada
2
Asia/M.East
2
Member of
NRA, Life SCI, Life DSC, Life EWA
Hunted
RSA, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Mongolia, Kyrgyzstan, Austria, Australia, TX, NM
I would never buy a double rifle with those sorts of obvious soldering issues. The rib soldering gaps are, well, gaping at the muzzle. @ActionBob has it exactly right. Check out the front end of a well made double - shotgun or rifle.
Yes I agree having something to compare to would be good. I am afraid of where the discussion of looking for a cheap double will lead. It’s like me asking to buy a $10,000 Ferrari. There may be one out there but you don’t want it!
Philip
 

Red Leg

Lifetime bronze benefactor
AH ambassador
Joined
May 19, 2009
Messages
6,712
Reaction score
19,673
Location
Texas Hill Country
Media
285
Articles
5
Hunting reports
Africa
2
USA/Canada
5
Mex/S.Amer
1
Europe
3
Member of
SCI DSC life memberships / NRA Patron Life
Hunted
Mexico, Namibia, RSA, Germany, Austria, Argentina, Canada, Mozambique, Spain, US (15 states)
Personally, I would take the advice of Cal Pappas over Craig Boddington any day of the week.
Gentlemen:

Allow me to chime in here, If you don’t mind. I’ve handled a few doubles in the past 30 years (1989 was my first double purchase) including several Sabattis.

First, there is more than the muzzle grinding. I’ve seen and shot rifles with the grinding and without the grinding and know have reports from several friends and many who white via my website. A few shoot well. Most shoot like shit. It’s common for one barrel to shoot well and the other to shoot a foot or two off target. Others shoot both barrels way off target. Some shoot fine. An attorney friend asked me to shoot his to get it on target. I could not. One of the muzzles was ground away and the muzzle looked egg shaped. Since the grinding sent the bullet off path, no amount of load adjustment would get the rifle to regulate property.

Second is the construction. Face it, gents, no double rifle can be made properly for the amount of a Sabatti. Remember, whatever the new ones sell for is retail, wholesale is approximately half that, and the amount paid directly to Sabatti is even less. They are priced the way they are because absolutely every step in the manufacturing process has been cut to the bones: time spent, cost of raw materials, finishing, quality of materials, etc.

A good mate in Zimbabwe bought a .500 Sabatti. It was not muzzle ground and it shot fairly well—3 to 4 inches at 50 yards. It probably could have been regulated to shoot a smaller group. Problems soon arose. The ribs began to loosen as the solder was both not well applied and not 100% soldered the full distance (spot soldered). The sights on the rib also began to shoot loose under recoil.

The rifle of my attorney, not only could not shoot accurately, but when shooting it on a foggy and moist day (not raining) light surface rust appeared on the action. This is a sign of soft, low carbon steel. Read cheap steel.

I’ve seen and/or been told of recoil pads that loosen, top levers that quickly become off center, stocks that develop cracks at the wrist, solder separation of the muzzle wedge, top rib coming loose, and front sights falling off.

Several non-English doubles cost more than a Sabatti but far less than those from the UK. Merkel, Verney Caron, Kreighoff, Heym, are four. The English and Scottish vintage doubles are the best in my humble opinion.

The only double of less quality than Sabatti is the Baikal (<$1000).

Personally I believe a good compromise can be had (price vs. quality) in the vintage black powder express English and Scottish doubles. The price of vintage doubles has dropped 25% on average the past six years. A good quality, engraved, tight on the face, perhaps with an original case, in .450 or .500 black powder express can be had for $5000 to $8000. Add another 50% for a .577. These rifles have dropped Cape buffalo and can still do so. Formulas are available to duplicate black powder ballistics with modern smokeless powders and, when combined with Woodeligh bullets, are suitable for plains game, Cape buffalo, bears, cats, elk, moose, bison, water buffalo, etc. Perhaps not hippo, elephant, or rhino. That said, a frontal brain shot on a hippo is easy done with a good bpe double rifle as the skill is only 1/4 to 3/8” thick.

More expensive than a Sabatti? Yes, About the same money as Merkels and other? Yes. I takes some effort to not want something new and to get used to hammers and a Jones under lever (although many hammerless bpe doubles are out there). I know my words will fall on deaf ears and many will disagree. That’s good. It leaves more vintage doubles out there for the minority such as myself. And, are reasonable prices.

Fellas, It’s not just accuracy. A cheap double can shoot accurately—for a while. Sabattis are bottom of the barrel double rifles: the materials used, the construction, and the finish.

Cal

Pretty sure Cal doesn't get a "consideration" from any 19th and early 20th century makers as well.

I quibble a bit with Cal over the suitability of the 500 BPE as an effective buffalo rifle. Yes for an expert - no for a first double for dangerous game. But I could not agree more with regard to quality and getting a product commensurate with what one invests. And I know of no one who frequents this site with more experience with double rifles than him. I would second the notion that there are some great buys in vintage doubles out there. I own several. However, I would urge anyone embarking on such a purchase for the first time to get expert help evaluating the rifle before writing a check. My personal SxS education over four decades was very expensive.

I personally believe that the Sabatti is a "cheap" double in just about every way. I would urge anyone wanting a quality new production rifle to save a bit more and get a VC or K-gun. My second choice (but very close) recommendations would be Merkel and Heym.
 

cal pappas

Contributor
AH enthusiast
Joined
May 7, 2015
Messages
333
Reaction score
738
Media
70
Hunting reports
Africa
4
Gentlemen:
My comments on Sabatti doubles are not what I read of other's experiences. I have held them, shot them, and known many who own them. A friend's Sabatti was worthless and he asked Cabela's to take it back. They refused. After my written evaluation of the rifle was submitted to Cabela's adn Sabaiit in Italy, it was rejected. My friend threatened to file a law suit. He was ignored. Then he let it be known he was a lawyer. Cabelas took the rifle back and gave him a refund. Damn! I was looking forward to being on the witness stand.

As to Craig Bodington. Ever notice all he says are good things about rifles, optics, ammo, slings, scope mounts, outfitters, etc.? He is paid to say them. He gets lots of free stuff. Although you'd never know it reading his bankruptcy papers. He's no different than those on TV who endorse products.

I have decided to sell most of my double collection and only keep a few to hunt with. I'm getting old with no family to leave anything to. Doubles I have are flawless in operation and are 0ver 100 years old. They won't fail to function tomorrow as they have a history of performance. I do have a couple of .450-400 rifles that will go on the block soon. Lots more than a Sabatti, 2x more than a Merkel. Vintage doubles are head and shoulders above anything made today; including today's doubles from the UK.

My apologies if anyone took offense to my Sabatti post. No harm was meant, just my personal experiences.
Cal
 

One Day...

Gold supporter
AH elite
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Messages
1,327
Reaction score
3,630
Website
www.huntershillsafaris.co.za
Media
381
Articles
1
Hunting reports
Africa
3
Member of
PHASA
Hunted
Europe, America, Canada, Africa
There is another recent thread on Sabatti doubles at https://www.africahunting.com/threads/how-are-the-new-sabattis-in-470-and-500.48462/#post-522796

Allow me to re-post here what I said there, because it seems relevant here:

"You never have a second chance to create a first impression" they say...

The thought that comes to mind is: did the .458 Win ever recover from its 1960's launch era issues when factually the early ammo under performed its specs, and factually there were genuine cases of compressed charges of Olin Chemical’s early ball powder causing erratic ignition. To this day, almost 60 years later, one continues to read about the .458 Win being an unreliable round, which is hogwash with current loads, although it is, naturally, less powerful than the full length Lott...

Will Sabatti ever recover from their attempt at "regulating" doubles by intentionally butchering the barrels crown to create sideways jetting of propellant gases? What do such short cuts by manufacturers tell us about their core business philosophy? Was this an individual judgment error or the symptom of systemic issues? Were there, are there, other short cuts in the Sabatti doubles manufacturing process? Your, my, or any poster's answer all have the same value: we would all be speculating...

For what it is worth, my Beretta Black Onyx shotgun has proved indestructible; but
1) my Zanardini kipplauf (single barrel break open rifle) in 7x65R had steel so soft that the cocking bar inside the action was bent out of function after less than 100 rounds, and the silver solder joint holding the barrel in the action monoblock broke when I shot it one day in negative temperature; and
2) my Zoli over/under double 9.3x74R went off the face and lost any semblance of accuracy in less than 200 rounds.

Are Italian smaller companies or artisan shops more susceptible to manufacturing issues than Italian international corporations (Beretta, Benelli, etc.)? I do not know... Were Italian steels softer in the 80's? Clearly! Has this been resolved? I do not know... Are these considerations relevant to Sabatti? I do not know... but there it is, based on my own first impressions and personal experience with smaller Italian firms break open rifles, my own .470 NE double is ... a Kreighoff.

If I were a PH and my double was a daily-use tool that I must rely on to keep my clients, trackers, and myself alive when everything has gone wrong, there are darn few modern manufacture doubles I would consider:
-- Heym, Kreighoff and Blaser would be at the top of my list;
-- followed by Chapuis;
-- followed by a big gap as these four really dominate;
-- followed by Verney Carron;
-- followed by Merkel (although I had a sidelock hammer break - brittle steel ! - on a 20 gauge sxs, which considerably reduced my trust in the brand)...

This post is sure to create a firestorm, but you asked for opinions, right? So, this is just mine...


As to a few posts here:

- I fully agree with cal pappas about low carbon soft steel being a perennial issue with Italian break open rifles. See my own experience described above. Has this been resolved? Maybe.

- In the electronics assembly business, a typical signature from a rookie is the excessive amount of solder used in a joint. The same applies to gun. What strikes me in these muzzle pictures is the amount of solder being used to fill holes that should be occupied by steel. A well made double does not have a gaping hole at the barrel junction, it has a steel wedge that are used to adjust the barrels spreads and solder joints are just hairlines between steel.

- Yes Boddington is on record for loving his Sabatti double. Leaving aside for a minute the issue of commercial endorsement, which he vehemently denies, I will observe something which in my mind is vastly more important. His Sabatti double is in 9.3x74R caliber. A vastly different kitten from the classic Nitro Express beasts.

- Regarding alternative offerings (twice as much as a Sabatti, but half the price of a Heym), George Caswell of Champlin Arms, a well recognized name in the American double market, and JJ Perodeau consider Chapuis as unbeatable. George states: "We have had every current made boxlock double rifle in our shop, have shot them all, worked on all, had all of them apart and we know for fact that you can't buy a better one for the money than a Chapuis. We regulate, re-joint, do triggers, re-barrel and hunt with and shoot a lot of double rifles. We flat know this is one tough, attractive, high precision, go to Africa and have money left for the second Buffalo type of gun. I challenge you to show me a better current double rifle for the money."

I am with Philip Glass, Red Leg, etc. here, guess what: there is a pretty darn good reason why the Ferrari is on the block for only $10,000...
 
Last edited:

One Day...

Gold supporter
AH elite
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Messages
1,327
Reaction score
3,630
Website
www.huntershillsafaris.co.za
Media
381
Articles
1
Hunting reports
Africa
3
Member of
PHASA
Hunted
Europe, America, Canada, Africa
Here is one FACTUAL issue with the Sabatti...

This is what a double rifle muzzle should look like (my Krieghoff .470 NE):
Muzzle Kreighoff.jpg


upload_2019-3-30_10-29-36.png

  • Notice the massive regulation wedge (red arrow) THAT ACTUALLY HOLDS THE BARRELS TOGETHER;
  • Notice the hairline solder joints between the wedge and the barrels (blue arrow);
  • Notice the hairline solder joint with the front sight (blue arrow);
  • Notice the small gaps between the wedge on the ribs (yellow arrow).
This is not TIG or MIG welding, the joints are not steel. They are soft solder. Soft solder has no structural integrity or mechanical strength, its only function is to join two pieces of steel.

This Sabatti's regulation "wedge" cannot possibly prevent overtime the barrels from yawing. It will ultimately act as a pivot point for the barrels...
Sabatti 1.JPG


This Sabatti apparently does not even have a regulation wedge !?!?!?
Sabatti 2.JPG


These, Gentlemen, are facts.

And of course, if you look at the muzzle of classic British doubles, the regulation wedge is so finely adjusted, that you do not even have ANY gap over and under it between the wedge and the ribs. These small gaps do not compromise the strength of the Kreighoff, but they contribute to explain why a Kreighoff is so much cheaper than a classic British.

And this is the point on which cbvanb is of course right: modern manufacturing can do faster and cheaper and just as strong (I bet you that a Heym, Kreighoff, Blaser, Chapuis is just as strong as a classic British or Scottish double), but these folks spent more time making sure that BOTH form and functions were perfect.

In my mind, Kreighoff sacrifices nothing on function but a little bit on form. I would love someone to post a pic of the muzzle of a Heym. I would not be surprised if it had no gap. There is certainly a reason why a Heym costs twice as much as a Kreighoff, and it is not function. it therefore has to be form...

It looks like Sabatti completely sacrifices function. Period. Seriously, how long do you think that a .500 NE assembled with only soft solder and without a regulation wedge is going to hold together?

I feel so sorry for the folks taken advantage of when buying these "rifles."
 
Last edited:

wesheltonj

AH legend
Joined
Feb 11, 2015
Messages
2,495
Reaction score
2,627
Location
South Texas
Media
19
Articles
7
Hunting reports
Africa
2
Member of
Benefactor-Life NRA, Life SCI, Life DSC, HSC
Hunted
USA, RSA
. . . As to Craig Bodington. Ever notice all he says are good things about rifles, optics, ammo, slings, scope mounts, outfitters, etc.? He is paid to say them. He gets lots of free stuff. Although you'd never know it reading his bankruptcy papers. He's no different than those on TV who endorse products. . .
Cal

Ain't that the truth.
 

Mort Hill

Gold supporter
AH elite
Joined
Jun 4, 2017
Messages
1,269
Reaction score
2,087
Location
Brentwood, TN
Media
81
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
Life Member SCI, Director-Music City SCI Chapter, NWTF, NRA
Hunted
SA, Zambia, Tanzania
Yes I agree having something to compare to would be good. I am afraid of where the discussion of looking for a cheap double will lead. It’s like me asking to buy a $10,000 Ferrari. There may be one out there but you don’t want it!
Philip

Excellent analogy Phillip. You can buy the $10K Ferrari and say you own one, but if it won’t make it out the driveway, are you still proud to say you own it. Yet some folks do just that. Too good to pass up. However, if I am putting my life, or that of the PH and staff on the line, I think I would just wait until the right, well regulated double came along. If you never plan to hunt with it, then by all means, buy the cheapest thing out there and keep in in the gun safe, except when impressionable guest are over who won’t know better.
 

Philip Glass

Lifetime bronze benefactor
AH legend
Joined
Feb 26, 2015
Messages
4,105
Reaction score
7,020
Location
Texas
Website
www.dorper.net
Media
86
Articles
13
Hunting reports
Africa
8
USA/Canada
2
Asia/M.East
2
Member of
NRA, Life SCI, Life DSC, Life EWA
Hunted
RSA, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Mongolia, Kyrgyzstan, Austria, Australia, TX, NM
Excellent analogy Phillip. You can buy the $10K Ferrari and say you own one, but if it won’t make it out the driveway, are you still proud to say you own it. Yet some folks do just that. Too good to pass up. However, if I am putting my life, or that of the PH and staff on the line, I think I would just wait until the right, well regulated double came along. If you never plan to hunt with it, then by all means, buy the cheapest thing out there and keep in in the gun safe, except when impressionable guest are over who won’t know better.
Mort that is a very good point. Ive found out the hard way not all big guns should be DG guns.
Philip
 
Joined
May 3, 2016
Messages
520
Reaction score
581
Location
New Mexico
Media
40
Hunting reports
Africa
2
Gentlemen:
My comments on Sabatti doubles are not what I read of other's experiences. I have held them, shot them, and known many who own them. A friend's Sabatti was worthless and he asked Cabela's to take it back. They refused. After my written evaluation of the rifle was submitted to Cabela's adn Sabaiit in Italy, it was rejected. My friend threatened to file a law suit. He was ignored. Then he let it be known he was a lawyer. Cabelas took the rifle back and gave him a refund. Damn! I was looking forward to being on the witness stand.

As to Craig Bodington. Ever notice all he says are good things about rifles, optics, ammo, slings, scope mounts, outfitters, etc.? He is paid to say them. He gets lots of free stuff. Although you'd never know it reading his bankruptcy papers. He's no different than those on TV who endorse products.

I have decided to sell most of my double collection and only keep a few to hunt with. I'm getting old with no family to leave anything to. Doubles I have are flawless in operation and are 0ver 100 years old. They won't fail to function tomorrow as they have a history of performance. I do have a couple of .450-400 rifles that will go on the block soon. Lots more than a Sabatti, 2x more than a Merkel. Vintage doubles are head and shoulders above anything made today; including today's doubles from the UK.

My apologies if anyone took offense to my Sabatti post. No harm was meant, just my personal experiences.
Cal

While I have no doubt that I cannot afford anything that you would put up, I would ask that you link them anyway so that at least I can look at them and get more examples of good doubles and what to look for in the future when I can afford something like that. As for them being old, well, I collect WW2 rifles as well and none of them have ever failed me. Old doesn't mean junk by any means, and anyone who thinks it does just needs a bit of re-education.
 
Joined
May 3, 2016
Messages
520
Reaction score
581
Location
New Mexico
Media
40
Hunting reports
Africa
2
Here is one FACTUAL issue with the Sabatti...

This is what a double rifle muzzle should look like (my Krieghoff .470 NE):
View attachment 276199

View attachment 276196
  • Notice the massive regulation wedge (red arrow) THAT ACTUALLY HOLDS THE BARRELS TOGETHER;
  • Notice the hairline solder joints between the wedge and the barrels (blue arrow);
  • Notice the hairline solder joint with the front sight (blue arrow);
  • Notice the small gaps between the wedge on the ribs (yellow arrow).
This is not TIG or MIG welding, the joints are not steel. They are soft solder. Soft solder has no structural integrity or mechanical strength, its only function is to join two pieces of steel.

This Sabatti's regulation "wedge" cannot possibly prevent overtime the barrels from yawing. It will ultimately act as a pivot point for the barrels...
View attachment 276197

This Sabatti apparently does not even have a regulation wedge !?!?!?
View attachment 276198

These, Gentlemen, are facts.

And of course, if you look at the muzzle of classic British doubles, the regulation wedge is so finely adjusted, that you do not even have ANY gap over and under it between the wedge and the ribs. These small gaps do not compromise the strength of the Kreighoff, but they contribute to explain why a Kreighoff is so much cheaper than a classic British.

And this is the point on which cbvanb is of course right: modern manufacturing can do faster and cheaper and just as strong (I bet you that a Heym, Kreighoff, Blaser, Chapuis is just as strong as a classic British or Scottish double), but these folks spent more time making sure that BOTH form and functions were perfect.

In my mind, Kreighoff sacrifices nothing on function but a little bit on form. I would love someone to post a pic of the muzzle of a Heym. I would not be surprised if it had no gap. There is certainly a reason why a Heym costs twice as much as a Kreighoff, and it is not function. it therefore has to be form...

It looks like Sabatti completely sacrifices function. Period. Seriously, how long do you think that a .500 NE assembled with only soft solder and without a regulation wedge is going to hold together?

I feel so sorry for the folks taken advantage of when buying these "rifles."

This is such an excellent breakdown I couldn't have asked for better if I was in a classroom. Thank you for the labels, the pictures, all of it. The more I learn the more I want one, but not just to "have" but to be proud of and use. Thank you again for all your knowledge!
 

Dewald

AH enthusiast
Joined
Aug 16, 2012
Messages
333
Reaction score
579
Location
Empangeni, Zululand
Media
98
Member of
KZN Hunters/ SAHGCA/
Hunted
South Africa, Namibia
One Day, your post caused me some serious doubt. I also always profess the value of vintage British boxlocks.

Would my almost 100 year old .450-.400 3&1/4 made by that Gibbs fellow be put together with heaps of solder or not?!?

Although I hunt with her often, recreationally and as backup, I’ve never paid that much attention to the muzzles, except to make sure they are clean.

Please excuse the exaggerated pitting on the macro photo of this working rifle. In reality they are tiny black dots, a mere thou or two deep, on a very old, and otherwise pristine rifle.

I believe Mr Gibbs’ soldering and regulation was quite neat, and as good as the best out there today.

IMG_6515.JPG
 
Last edited:

One Day...

Gold supporter
AH elite
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Messages
1,327
Reaction score
3,630
Website
www.huntershillsafaris.co.za
Media
381
Articles
1
Hunting reports
Africa
3
Member of
PHASA
Hunted
Europe, America, Canada, Africa
This is such an excellent breakdown I couldn't have asked for better if I was in a classroom. Thank you for the labels, the pictures, all of it. The more I learn the more I want one, but not just to "have" but to be proud of and use. Thank you again for all your knowledge!
"Pleasure!" as your PH would likely reply :)

One Day, your post caused me some serious doubt. I also always profess the value of vintage British boxlocks.
Would my almost 100 year old .450-.400 3&1/4 made by that Gibbs fellow be put together with heaps of solder or not?!?
Although I hunt with her often, recreationally and as backup, I’ve never paid that much attention to the muzzles, except to make sure they are clean.
Please excuse the exaggerated pitting on the macro photo of this working rifle. In reality they are tiny black dots, a mere thou or two deep, on a very old, and otherwise pristine rifle.
I believe Mr Gibbs’ soldering and regulation was quite neat, and as good as the best out there today.
View attachment 276657
Yep, this is the perfect illustration of my point in the previous post. Thank you for posting this pic.
On this Gibbs, one can barely discern the two horizontal hairline solder joints between the regulation wedge and the top and bottom ribs. This rifle was assembled the way it should be done. About a full 1/4 of the circumferences of the barrels are soldered to the massive regulation wedge, the massive upper rib and the lower rib. Nothing is ever going to be shaking loose there.
This compares advantageously to the 1/16 of circumference soldered to the upper rib on the .500 NE Sabatti pictured above, and the two tiny contact points on each barrel with the lower rib. Saddly, for this Sabatti, it is not "if" it is simply "when"...
And this is why, to cal pappas' point, a well made century old rifle is infinitely more desirable, more reliable, and safer than a modern poorly made rifle...
 
Last edited:

Red Leg

Lifetime bronze benefactor
AH ambassador
Joined
May 19, 2009
Messages
6,712
Reaction score
19,673
Location
Texas Hill Country
Media
285
Articles
5
Hunting reports
Africa
2
USA/Canada
5
Mex/S.Amer
1
Europe
3
Member of
SCI DSC life memberships / NRA Patron Life
Hunted
Mexico, Namibia, RSA, Germany, Austria, Argentina, Canada, Mozambique, Spain, US (15 states)
One Day, your post caused me some serious doubt. I also always profess the value of vintage British boxlocks.

Would my almost 100 year old .450-.400 3&1/4 made by that Gibbs fellow be put together with heaps of solder or not?!?

Although I hunt with her often, recreationally and as backup, I’ve never paid that much attention to the muzzles, except to make sure they are clean.

Please excuse the exaggerated pitting on the macro photo of this working rifle. In reality they are tiny black dots, a mere thou or two deep, on a very old, and otherwise pristine rifle.

I believe Mr Gibbs’ soldering and regulation was quite neat, and as good as the best out there today.

View attachment 276657
Perfect photo to show those perfect tiny seams ............
"Pleasure!" as your PH would likely reply :)


Yep, this is the perfect illustration of my point in the previous post. Thank you for posting this.
On this Gibbs, one can barely discern the two horizontal hairline solder joints between the regulation wedge and the top and bottom ribs. This rifle was assembled the way it should be done. About a full 1/4 of the circumferences of the barrels are soldered to the massive regulation wedge, the massive upper rib and the the lower rib. Nothing is ever going to be shaking loose there. This compares advantageously to the 1/16 of circumference soldered to the upper rib on the .500 NE Sabatti pictured above, and the two tiny contact points on each barrel with the lower rib. Saddly, for this Sabatti, it is not "if" it is simply "when"...
And this is why, to cal pappas' point, a well made century old rifle is infinitely more desirable, more reliable, and safer than a modern poorly made rifle...

Beat me to i! But exactly the sort of incredible fitting that goes into a well made double - now or a hundred years ago. And the action, the heat treatment of the springs and sears (different at different places on the same tiny part), the fitting of the joint, etc, etc are the differences between a rifle or shotgun that will shoot for a few hundred rounds or a hundred years.
 

One Day...

Gold supporter
AH elite
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Messages
1,327
Reaction score
3,630
Website
www.huntershillsafaris.co.za
Media
381
Articles
1
Hunting reports
Africa
3
Member of
PHASA
Hunted
Europe, America, Canada, Africa
Amen!
 

DaveL

AH member
Joined
Mar 17, 2017
Messages
34
Reaction score
62
Location
Zimbabwe / Mozambique
Media
3
Member of
Zimbabwe Professional Hunters and Guides Association, African Professional Hunters Association, Mozambican Outfitters Association (AMOS), SCI
So what should the crown look like if the gun is not one of those Cabela's ones with gremlins? Again, I'm one of those double gun tyros but am very interested in a Sabatti in either .470 or .500.
 

Ed Hawkins

AH senior member
Joined
Feb 11, 2010
Messages
64
Reaction score
70
Location
Idaho
Media
7
Member of
SCI, RMEF, DU, NRA
Hunted
South Africa, USA
So what should the crown look like if the gun is not one of those Cabela's ones with gremlins? Again, I'm one of those double gun tyros but am very interested in a Sabatti in either .470 or .500.

IMG_1668.JPG
 

375 Ruger Fan

Gold supporter
AH legend
Joined
Jun 14, 2015
Messages
4,137
Reaction score
6,531
Location
Shreveport, Louisiana
Media
237
Articles
5
Hunting reports
Africa
7
USA/Canada
4
Australia/NZ
1
Member of
NRA, DSC
Hunted
Namibia, Zimbabwe, South Africa (Eastern Cape & NW), Canada, New Zealand, Alaska, TX, LA, MO, OH, MT, ID, WA, WY
- Regarding alternative offerings (twice as much as a Sabatti, but half the price of a Heym), George Caswell of Champlin Arms, a well recognized name in the American double market, and JJ Perodeau consider Chapuis as unbeatable. George states: "We have had every current made boxlock double rifle in our shop, have shot them all, worked on all, had all of them apart and we know for fact that you can't buy a better one for the money than a Chapuis. We regulate, re-joint, do triggers, re-barrel and hunt with and shoot a lot of double rifles. We flat know this is one tough, attractive, high precision, go to Africa and have money left for the second Buffalo type of gun. I challenge you to show me a better current double rifle for the money."

 

3S SAFARIS

Sponsor
Since 2017
AH fanatic
Joined
Aug 15, 2013
Messages
532
Reaction score
383
Location
76476
Website
www.3ssafaris.com
Media
221
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
SCI
Hunted
Namibia, South Africa, Canada, Colorado, Wyoming, Texas, Kansas
Latest and greatest from Sabatti or IFG sent email in regards to the new EDL rifle they have as I am interested in a double but all I have found is 450/400 on Gunbroker. I am interested in seeing one in person and handling it , they said they were at DSC last 4 years as I was looking for Sabatti booth not IFG , any way want to compare the feel of the EDL compared to a Merkel .
They said they are on order and don't know when they will arrive ( they have said that since the EDL came out last year) went down the list of dealers I called roughly 30 of them all over the US and they only have older models.
So if you are looking for one there you have it …… keep looking I guess.
 

Ryan

AH elite
Joined
Apr 16, 2011
Messages
1,087
Reaction score
1,422
Location
Anchorage, Alaska
Media
120
Articles
2
Hunting reports
Africa
3
Member of
Black Sheep Bowmen Archery Club.
Hunted
Namibia and South Africa
Slightly off subject, since the manufacturer is different. Are the Davide Pedersoli Mark IV doubles in the same sketchy class as the Sabatti doubles? I remembered the 45-70 and then looked them up and they also make (or made) a 8X57 JRS.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
37,664
Messages
720,154
Members
67,390
Latest member
Williamapecy
 

 

 

Latest profile posts

Cervus elaphus wrote on Bob Nelson 35Whelen's profile.
Hi Bob, how's things going in Wyong?. Down your way a couple of years back but haven't been in NSW since Ebor for the fishing. just getting over some nasty storms up here in Qld, seeing the sun for the first time in a few days. I'm going to NZ in the spring and hope to clean up a few buns while there and perhaps shake the spiders out of my old .303LE (currently owned by my BIL). Cheers Brian
A couple pictures of the sable i chased for miles in Mozambique, Coutada 9!! We finally caught up to him and I had the trophy of a lifetime. Mokore Safaris, Doug Duckworth PH
sable Coutada 9.JPG
sable 2 - Coutada 9.JPG
Safari Dave wrote on egrmpty507's profile.
Did you purchase your hunt at a US SCI fundraiser?
uplander01 wrote on colorado's profile.
Heard you may have load data for the 500 Jeffery,.....any info would be appreciated. Was thinking 535gr, but already had a response that the 570gr would be a better way to go, not sure why.
Rickmt wrote on Leica Sport Optics's profile.
will Leica Amplus 6-2.5x15x50 fit on a pro success Blaser with low mount?
 
Top