Legend of Sri Lankan Bison - GAWARA

yasindu

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Giant buffalo lived in Sri Lanka known as Gawara. They are smaller than Indian gaurs but they were very violent according to the historical records. There are many stories about them. Last know Gawara herd was sighted in knuckles mountain region im the early 19th century. Now there are only remainings and legends about this majestic beasts just like tasmanian tigers.

for more.


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Interesting.
 
In my opnion they shuold consider introduction of gaur (closest relative) in the forests of sri lanka.
 
Doesn't it automatically translate in to English? Oh Im really sorry about that. But It shows in English for me. Maybe a tech
Issue.
LOL! That drawing is a tough looking beast!
 
Interestinlgly, wikipedia on GAUR, states gaur inhabited sri lanka, then extinct. . Ergo, reintroduction of gaur would establish an old eco system. Native species.
 
Translated page from Sinhala to English using online translation:

“CEYLON GAUR is an endangered mammal that inhabited Sri Lanka.

Introduction. The gawra is a large, large-bodied, time-colored animal. According to Mr. Deraniyagala and some other British writers, there is a species of grass in the Sinhala language called Gawaramana, Gawara Eliya, Gawarawila, Gawara Kele, as well as a species of grass called 'Gawara Mana'. According to the language, the gawara may have lived in Sri Lanka. In addition, there was an animal called a gawara in the Heladiva Grantha written by Robert Knox. According to him, the gawara has the same characteristics as a cow. The villagers say that they did not see Knox saying that there was an animal named Gawra. In addition, John Doyle's report contains information about Gavara. Similar in color to a cow, but with a horn bent downwards. This animal is rarely seen. Doyle says he once heard of a captured cow being brought to Kandy. However, the cow died a short time later. 'Eleven Years in Ceylon' by Major Forbes 1840: II.159) Gawara is also mentioned in the book. He points out that the plains between Nuwara Eliya and Samanalakantha were then known as Gawara Eliya. Major Forb says that Gawara was a very dangerous animal. James Emerson Tennant's Ceylon: An account of The island Physical, Historical and Topographical (1859) also contains information about Gavara. An old Sinhala man once told him about Gavara. Gavara lived in the Horton Plains area. He was a dark brown animal with features similar to gona and buffalo. The old man told Tennant that Gawara lived in the central hills. According to folklore, the man who fought and won with a cow was able to become the king's bodyguard. Dr. PEP Deraniyagala found skeletal remains in Gavara in 1962 in Ratnapura. In addition, several such excavations have uncovered fossils that can be attributed to Gavara.

Human hunting is thought to have become extinct due to epidemics.”
 
Translated page from Sinhala to English using online translation:

“CEYLON GAUR is an endangered mammal that inhabited Sri Lanka.

Introduction. The gawra is a large, large-bodied, time-colored animal. According to Mr. Deraniyagala and some other British writers, there is a species of grass in the Sinhala language called Gawaramana, Gawara Eliya, Gawarawila, Gawara Kele, as well as a species of grass called 'Gawara Mana'. According to the language, the gawara may have lived in Sri Lanka. In addition, there was an animal called a gawara in the Heladiva Grantha written by Robert Knox. According to him, the gawara has the same characteristics as a cow. The villagers say that they did not see Knox saying that there was an animal named Gawra. In addition, John Doyle's report contains information about Gavara. Similar in color to a cow, but with a horn bent downwards. This animal is rarely seen. Doyle says he once heard of a captured cow being brought to Kandy. However, the cow died a short time later. 'Eleven Years in Ceylon' by Major Forbes 1840: II.159) Gawara is also mentioned in the book. He points out that the plains between Nuwara Eliya and Samanalakantha were then known as Gawara Eliya. Major Forb says that Gawara was a very dangerous animal. James Emerson Tennant's Ceylon: An account of The island Physical, Historical and Topographical (1859) also contains information about Gavara. An old Sinhala man once told him about Gavara. Gavara lived in the Horton Plains area. He was a dark brown animal with features similar to gona and buffalo. The old man told Tennant that Gawara lived in the central hills. According to folklore, the man who fought and won with a cow was able to become the king's bodyguard. Dr. PEP Deraniyagala found skeletal remains in Gavara in 1962 in Ratnapura. In addition, several such excavations have uncovered fossils that can be attributed to Gavara.

Human hunting is thought to have become extinct due to epidemics.”
Thank you for your help mr.
 

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