Travel Documents & Money

jeff

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Jeff;
Was that the new scanners where they make you hold your hands up and the thing in front of you sweeps across? In my experience those pick up everything and they caught a folded up $100 bill in my pocket. The older units are more forgiving... I mean those new ones show all the details!

They caused some controversy in Minneapolis because they show all the anatomy and everything... I heard they have tuned them now to be more blurry, but either story could be urban myth.

When all this detailed scanning and stripping down started, there was a news story about a very in shape young couple coming in and quickly pealing off all there clothes except for some tight fitting athletic underwear and walking through to the gaping stares of the TSA workers...... They were just trying to make a point or get on the news I would guess.

Kinda funny though!
That was just this year in Aug, I flew back into the states to Dulles and had to go through customs and the security check and it never showed. Also at Johannesburg on the return. I wear it low so maybe they think it's an adult diaper! LOL
 

Tanks

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This is why I love this forum. There's a lot of info. and some of it's conflicting. These kinds of posts help us all try and sort it out.

We were told to absolutely not pack anything in the gun cases except guns & scopes.
The reason? Lots of stuff in a gun case could cause the American TSA to alarm the case if they couldn't make out the contents due to "extras" in the case.
...

First I think James meant after you are at camp. I would not put cash in anything that gets loaded on the airplane. On my recent trip I put all my cash, passport etc., in my ammo case, locked it, put that in my Tuffpak and locked it as well.

As well as TSA is concerned, I have put all sorts of stuff in my Tuffpak. In larger airports all TSA does is to check it with the chemical sniffer, they already know weapons are in there and X-Rays can discern the stuff anyway.
 

bluey

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you mean you can put your locked ammo box in a locked riffle case??
l always utelise the space in both ammo box/riffle case and bow case , with knives, slings,cleaning case, clothes.
usually my bow case is my suit case.
but if you put ammo and fire arms together , they wont get out of Australia.
I always make a point of asking why my arrows ,with broadheads can travel with my bow in the same case , but customs/border protection , don't care.......
 

Tanks

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You misunderstood me, I said AT CAMP. That being said one can put the ammo in the gun case on US flights originating from the States as long as you are going non-stop to your destination (if international), it is not against TSA rules but is dependent on the airline. On Delta I have put them together.

Now, in most cases one would use full 11 pounds of ammo allowance. So, it makes sense to put the locked ammo case in the checked luggage separate from the gun case in order to be below 50 pounds and not pay excess luggage fees.
 

Michael Dean

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Currency Exchange
Just a thought for those planning on a trip to South Africa this year. One step I took to simplicate matters while in Africa is to get my Rand from my local bank back home. After 20 plus hours of traveling, the last thing I want to be doing is looking for a bank to exchange currency once I land in Africa. I've already ordered it and should be able to pick it up in a couple of days. One less thing I have to worry about while traveling.
 
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sierraone

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I have obtained my rand from my bank also. I only carry enough rand for a local shop or lunch at the airport while waiting to depart back to the U.S. Everyone in camp takes dollars for tips. This is the way I have paid on two trips to South Africa.....And I pay the tips to camp staff myself, from PH down to cleaning lady. And everybody is happy. Any unplanned animals I may take is paid with AMEX at the camp.
 

jeff

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I never take Rand anymore, just use my credit card for any curios , meals and other small expenses.
 

Mr. Zorg

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The yellow fever vaccination is a strong point. My wife & I have been globetrotters to an extent for scuba vacations, but not to a country where proof of yellow fever vaccination is required to re-enter the USA yet. A really good former primary care physician I had at one point in the past detailed a scenario he'd seen as a way some medical service providers operate in some of these areas. Those countries will typically not require such a vaccination to enter, but having it done + proof that it's current before leaving the US is highly recommended. He said you can get the vaccination and documentation generally in such destinations but there may be surprise surcharges for add-ons such as cost for the foreign physician to use a brand new sterile syringe plus a brand new sterile hypodermic needle if those are desirable optional services . . .
 

SSGBIV

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- Medical insurance card and telephone numbers, ask for contact numbers other than an 800 number as they do not work from foreign countries.
I strongly recommend to all hunters traveling to Africa to consider purchasing medical travel insurance coverage as in most instances no liability is accepted by the outfitter, and they usually do not carry insurance for this. You may purchase an independent policy for this purpose or contact your current medical insurance company well before your trip to find out to what extent you are covered while overseas. Be sure to tell them that you will be engaging in a hunting safari as many insurance companies will not provide coverage if you are participating in a dangerous activity that they deem an extraordinary risk.
For some insurance companies you may need to inform them in writing of your trip in order to be covered. You need to ask how to notify them if you require medical services, you may have a limited amount of time to inform them.

- Medical evacuation card and telephone numbers
Ask for contact numbers other than an 800 number as they do not work from foreign countries. I strongly recommend getting medical evacuation membership especially if you are hunting in more remote area(s) that require air charter.






Special Note
Recently, I have heard of some cases of departing passengers being randomly checked to see if they are carrying more than $10,000 in Cash (any currency) and/or Travelers Checks. Individuals carrying the combined equivalent of US $10,000 or more are required to file a FinCen Form 105 with US Customs at your departing airport. It is not difficult to do and could save you a huge and unnecessary hassle since it is a federal crime if you don't and are unfortunate enough to get checked. Click here to download the form FinCEN Form 105 - Report of International Transportation of Currency or Monetary Instruments.

Thanks for the tips. You had the answers to the exact questions I was looking for, which saved me from having to post a question thread!
 

SSGBIV

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Thanks Nyati. Those sound a little different than the ones I saw. Problem is TSA wants all paper off your body going through those new scanners and I get nervous about pulling out a pouch that is obviously full of cash in the airport where all can see. But I suppose one could have in a carry on and duck into a restroom later to reposition.
Don't use the scanners. If you have "limited range of motion" they will not force you to raise your hands above your head and will direct you through the metal detector instead.
 

Philip Glass

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Safari Planning- Air Travel
A video with tips for long flights and planning for safari!

 

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Safekeeping Your Travel Documents


GR-membership-card-passport-boarding-pass 2.jpg

Keeping essential travel documents and information safe — and accessible — during travel requires planning and preparation.

If damaged or lost during travel, replacing these documents can, at best, be an inconvenience and, at worst, alter your trip plans from vacation enjoyment to bureaucratic Embassy and consulate visits.

“Important documents during international travel go beyond just your passport,” says Harding Bush, a former Navy SEAL, an expert in high-risk travel, and associate manager operation for Global Rescue. “Travel paperwork includes a driver’s license or other identity cards, medical insurance or evacuation service information, medical prescriptions, bank and credit cards, and your contacts list.”

Make Copies
Have physical and electronic copies of your passport, visas, and entry stamps. The visa and entry stamp clarify the legal status of your visit.

One copy will stay at home with a friend or family member. The other copy you’ll bring with you. Sometimes it is a requirement travelers carry their passports at all times and sometimes a copy is sufficient.

“Understand the laws of the country you are visiting,” Bush said. “The country you visit determines this requirement — not your home country.”

Start With a Travel Document Organizer
First, you need a place to put your travel paperwork. There is a multitude of travel organizers, travel wallets, and passport wallets on the market. Choose one that works for you. You will also need clothing with zippered pockets and a small backpack with multiple zippered compartments.

The most crucial document you carry with you overseas is your passport. Your passport identifies yourself as well as your nationality and your legal status in the country you are visiting. You should always keep your passport close at hand: in a zippered pocket on your person.

Other essential items, like copies of your travel paperwork, can be kept in a backpack. The backpack carries items you’ll use throughout the day: a rain jacket, sweater, water bottle, snacks, and other items specific to your activity. The backpack goes everywhere with you — do not check it at the gate when offered by the airline. It goes in the taxi with you — not in the trunk.

Use the room safe to store your passport if it’s not with you.

Accessibility Is Important
“Ensure the documents required are accessible. You want to be streamlined and not have to fumble or search for these items when needed,” Bush said.

He suggests carrying a few dollars in your pocket “so you don't have to take your wallet out for smaller transactions, such as tipping or buying a bottle of water,” he said.

Electronic Storage
Most travel documents can be conveniently stored on a smartphone. It’s fine to do so, just make sure all your information is backed up with physical copies. This includes phone numbers, which are usually just stored on your phone.

“If your battery dies, you may not be able to recharge quickly enough and, in the meantime, you have lost access to a lot of important docents and information,” Bush said. “I have seen instances where the airline’s electronic reader was malfunctioning, and only those passengers with paper boarding passes could board.”

You should have electronic copies of everything — passport, visas, credit cards, and prescriptions. In addition to photos of each document saved in your phone, consider keeping them on a password-protected thumb drive. You can also e-mail this information to yourself or save it in drafts, making it permanently accessible.

Other Digital Considerations
Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology uses radio waves to identify people or objects.

An RFID-protected wallet is essential to help protect the digital information on all your cards.

You should also protect your documents and electronic devices from physical damage, especially in a maritime environment. This means zip lock bags for the documents in your backpack and shockproof and waterproof protection for your smartphone. Your backpack should have a carabiner on the top carrying strap so you can secure it while onboard a boat. If you plan to use your phone while onboard, it should be in a waterproof container with a lanyard attached to your person.

According to the U.S. Department of State, water-damaged passports need to be replaced. There are also descriptions of what is considered damage and what is considered natural wear and tear. The U.K. government has similar guidelines.

If You Lose Your Passport
As soon as you realize your passport is missing, you should notify local law enforcement and your home country’s consulate or embassy.

Your hotel or guide service can likely assist you with contacting law enforcement to report the missing passport. Embassies will require a police report to move forward with replacement. There is also a good chance your lost passport could be turned in to the police if found.

“The police report can also function as a way to board aircraft for a domestic flight without having the usual required identification,” Bush said.

Keep in mind: once you have reported your passport lost or stolen, it is invalidated by the State Department and cannot be used if it is found.

The embassy will not consider a lost passport an emergency, and the replacement process will happen on their schedule, not yours.

“You may have to wait over a weekend for the embassy to open or divert your travel for a visit to the consulate or embassy, a potentially inconvenient and expensive process,” Bush said. “U.S. embassies can issue an emergency passport, which may not be suitable for onward travel to countries other than the United States.”

Losing your passport is inconvenient, but it’s not the end of the world — especially if you are a Global Rescue member. When Maredith Richardson lost her passport in Paris, Global Rescue security experts stepped in, managed the international administrative challenges, and quickly helped her obtain a passport replacement in less than a week. It’s just one of the many benefits of a travel protection services membership.
 

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Rick HOlbert wrote on NTH's profile.
NTH, Just found your message. I hunt with Eland Pro Safaris in Namibia. Wide selection of game and great folks. Hell my PH and his family ARE adopted family, LOL! I book people to hunt with them and should you be interested I'd be happy to meet and discuss a trip. Anyway all the best to you and give me a shout sometime. Bye for now.
NTH wrote on Rick HOlbert's profile.
Nice “meeting” you Rick. I made my first trip to S. Africa this year through Kuche Safaris. We had an incredible time. What outfitter do you use? Neal
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