SOUTH AFRICA: A Return To Huntershill Safaris - Even Better Than Last Year!

TragicLogic

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I might be getting lazy; I just dropped them in like this. I thought I had read somewhere that you had to leave them in their original boxes. Of course that wouldn't make sense because a lot of people reload...still, who knows what regulations will be enforced on any given day.

IMG_20190901_222159.jpg
 
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@one day, I'm sure Roy Weatherby must be rejoicing of happiness reading your hunting report and knowing you used his favorite caliber the 257 Weatherby. Great report, and I'm a big fan of the 257 Weatherby, and Weatherby calibers & rifles too. (y)
 
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A quest for a better Impala...

From there, days went by in a happy blur. I do not exactly remember the 4th, the 10th or the 7th, or even the 2nd day, but I remember well 'the day of the Sable', 'the day of Lechwe,' the two 'days of the Impala', so let go along these happy memories...

Last year I had shot a nice Impala at Huntershill (https://www.africahunting.com/threa...-2018-plains-game-paradise.45017/#post-474345), but it was a bit on the young side. Spread and length could be bettered. So we were on a quest for a better Impala. Well, here is the trick, they do not grow on trees...

After a couple days in Huntershill, up in the Mountain on the East side of the valley, we spotted a small group of females across a canyon. After a while on the binoculars, a single horn was spotted behind bushes. Jason, the PH, decided that it was worth investigating. We left the truck, grabbed the sticks and hiked back over our ridge, across the canyon out of sight, and stalked carefully the opposite ridge. Good plan and good execution. They were there. We approached to within 200 yards. Jason spread the sticks, I got on them...

Many of you may remember that I was not overly happy with my shooting last year. Yes, everything dropped, generally to the first shot, but many animals were still alive when we reached them. "Putting one in the boiler room" works, especially with the big .340 Wby, but many shots landed a few inches right, left or high. The cross hair was hovering too much back then, and it was due to my lack of practice shooting off the sticks. So, before going this year, I shot 5,000 (yes, five thousands) rounds of .22 lr at 150 yd off the sticks on a 6" steel plate.

View attachment 298853
Winchester 52 in .22 lr. Full size .22 lr rifle practice will do wonders for your African shooting off the sticks.

And it paid off!

The rifle went on the sticks by its own accord, my feet spread in the right position without me thinking about it, the cross hair stabilized where it was supposed to, all by itself, and that mysterious force that fires the rifles operated. There was a bang; a whomp; and a dead-in-its-track Impala that did not move one step.

How did the .257 Wby perform? Well, the Impala is a small animal, so I had little doubt, and it was no surprise when we got to him that I would not have a nice picture of the 100 gr TTSX to show you. In it went ... and dramatically out it is gone...

View attachment 298851
The shot was a tad high. I would need to remember better that at ~200 yd, sighted to be dead-on at 300 yd, the .257 Wby 100 gr TTSX still flies 2 1/2 " high...

I had a nice Impala...

View attachment 298850
This 2019 nice Huntershill Impala was better than my 2018 Huntershill Impala. I was happy...

Lo and behold, a few days later, while looking for a good Warthog at the Rockland property that Huntershill also own two hours South of Huntershill - one of my goals was to go hunt this property, because I did not last year - the Gods of Africa smiled upon me and we stumbled on an even better Impala. That was the second 'day of the Impala'.

Jason was so excited that he stuttered and babbled nonsense about a "funken monsta" so, of course, we had to jump off the Toyota and run (physically) after him. The Gods continued to smile, he stopped as we crested the ridge not even 100 yd below, and the little .257 Wby came up my shoulder, the action worked itself by magic, the cross hair stopped on him, and the rifle went boom all by itself. The bang and the wonk merged, and the trackers started dancing...

View attachment 298852
When the Gods of the Hunt smile upon you, you do not kick them in the teeth. This second 2019 Huntershill Impala is all I could dream of. I will likely not shoot a better one in quite a while...

How about the .257 Wby performance? By now it was becoming boring. I do not remember if it was the second Impala, or one of the Warthogs - see upcoming posts - but sometime along the way we stopped keeping score at 10 animals in the salt for 10 shots, all of them DRT (dead right there), and, dang it!, still no bullet to recover to shoot a nice picture of a beautifully petaled 100 gr TTSX... All in and out with enough expansion to leave a quarter sized exit hole...
@one day
It is a beautiful feeling when you get a great trophy. My impala was the second biggest to come off the property. It's size didn't worry m e but the owner wanted to measure it and it was a quarter of an inch smaller than their biggest ever. To say I was stoked was an understatement. I took him with my Whelen. I would dearly liked to have taken my 25 but being a wildcat I couldn't get the appropriate head stamped brass.
Bob
 

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@One Day...
What a great report! Well written, great photos and videos!
I’m so glad I finally got to reading it.
Thank you for sharing it and congratulations on all those beautiful trophies!
 
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@One Day...
What a great report! Well written, great photos and videos!
I’m so glad I finally got to reading it.
Thank you for sharing it and congratulations on all those beautiful trophies!
@RandyF
Good to see you are out of hospital and able to read again. Are you back on solid food yet after smashing the fit bit the wife gave you.
Bob
 
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The Prince of the Bush

I have long lusted for a Sable.

It did not have to be a 'record book' Sable, I truly do not care, I do not measure my animals, I just wanted an old, representative Sable. I had told so to Jason. We had that discussion along the way. "You know," Jason had said, "more PH and client great relationships have been destroyed by a tape measure, than by anything else," he paused thoughtfully, "this is the bane of African hunting." I encouraged him to go forward. "You see," he continued, "a client who is perfectly happy with his Kudu, a great Kudu, and who had an unforgettable hunt for it, and made great memories, and could keep those memories for ever..." he paused again, melancholic, "...can have his entire experience ruined by a tape measure." "I hate tape measures!" he added, now genuinely upset. Oh, how I understood him! I have seen along the way the happy client, the triumphal client, coming back from a hunt of a lifetime, with a great trophy ... turn into a dejected, angry, reproachful inquisitor because the dang tape measure came 1/2 inch short. Gone the wonderful experience, forgotten the hunt of a lifetime, erased the immense achievement, destroyed the friendship with the PH, the darn horns are 1/2 inch short! Curse it! "Thank you," I told Jason, "thank you for reminding me that." He was apologetic now: "Oh, I did not mean...", "I know," I interrupted, "but thank you for saying this anyway, it helps me too keep things in focus." You see, everyone can become contaminated by continual talk of "really good head," "great trophy," "monster!" and I knew, deep down in myself, that I was not necessarily immune to developing an overly exalted sense of myself, just because the Gods of Africa have been really generous to me these last two years, and it is a slippery slope toward the blasted tape measure and its inevitable, sooner or later, bitter disappointment. "Thank you," I said again...

So our hearts were light and our mood joyous that morning, during the first week, when Jason said: "I am going to show you Pacet, today." "Pacet?"(pronounced Pachet, like 'hatchet') I asked. "This the old farm on the other side of the mountain," Jason replied, "it is part of Huntershill, but on the other side." "Few people go there, he added. "I think you will like it," he concluded.

View attachment 299574
Pacet, the old farm on the other side of the mountain. "It is part of Huntershill, but on the other side. Few people go there," Jason said, "I think you will like it..."

I loved Pacet! Just as we started crawling up the first foothill, with the Toyota in low gear, we immediately faced a dilemma. Jason was negotiating a track that even a D6 Caterpillar dozer, fresh from a full rebuild, would have had second thoughts about, when I blurted "there!" Across the Canyon, maybe 200 or 300 yards away, a Waterbuck was sunning himself, comfortably bedded at the foot of a beautiful Aloe Vera tree in full bloom, vibrant with rich red color in the glory of the raising sun. The Toyota hiked up on top of rocks that would have indicated the end of the trail for about any other wheeled contraption, and Jason killed the engine. Henry and Strahli were already glued to their new Vortex binoculars. I heard a soft "ooooh." I smiled: Henry liked him. A short burst of murmured Khoisan dialect confirmed that Strahli had a pretty good opinion of the Waterbuck too. Jason was silent, peering through his Leica. "Hmmm?" I tentatively asked, having learned a prodigious amount of vocabulary over the last few days. "I don't know," replied Jason, "the one you got last year is better, I think." "You know, I have been wondering myself," I said, '"I think you are right." We glassed again for several minutes. "Not often I will pass one like that," Jason concluded, restarting the Land Cruiser's engine and giving briefly his verdict in Afrikaans to Henry and Strahli who sat on the high bench on the back of the truck.

View attachment 299575
"The one you got last year is better, I think," said Jason...

Soon we were on an idyllic flat, perched between foothills and mountains. "I would not mind camping here," I said. "I would not mind it myself," approved Jason, and we dove hood first into a strange little forest of Aloe Vera tree, interspersed with rich meadows claimed by several family groups of Giraffe.

There the game started. It was hide and seek. A black form dashing to the left revealed the Sable. Jason made a sharp turn to the right and we drove in a back half circle to get ahead of them. This, we did quite nicely. But there were no Sable there. A Khoisan burst came from the back. Hah! Now they were on our right, streaming through the trees 200 or 300 yards away. A young bull. Promising, but nowhere near its potential. Female. Female. Young. Young. Young bull again. Another young bull, older but still young. Papa. A few lesser ones. Grand Pa? A wide semi circle to the left this time. Surely, we would reach the ridge before them and catch them for a better look. We got to the small ridge, killed the engine and watched. And waited. And waited. And waited, glassing below us. No Sable. Another burst of Khoisan. Hah! They went the other side! But why? And now a group of Springbok appeared behind them, almost sheep dogging them in front of them. OK, new strategy. Let's go to the ridge on the other side. Jason drove a wide detour and as we were about to climb the other ridge a sharp wrap resonated on the truck cabin roof. Jason lifted his eyes to the outdoor rear view mirror - that always gets angled just so when we are hunting, so that he can see Henry on one side and Strahli on the other side - and I saw in the corner of Jason's right side mirror I could barely see from my seat on the left, a black finger pointing. A group of Kudu already occupied our ridge, and started to show nervousness. Hah! And now our Sable were half a mile away still at a full trot, not really fleeing, but clearly concerned. No way we could catch up to them on foot. And the game went on, and on, with occasional interludes provided by Giraffe that would not let us sneak through a meadow without starting their strange slow motion gallop, scaring everything in front of them; a group of Impala rocketing in panic ahead of us; another Waterbuck crashing through the thickest bush as if it was an English green; and a threesome of Ostrich having apparently decided to herald our every move in their frantic flight always precisely in the direction we wanted to go. Two hours later we recognized that we were beaten...

View attachment 299576
A strange little forest of Aloe Vera tree, on a flat on top of the foothills, interspersed with rich meadows claimed by several family groups of Giraffe...

Sable may be the "Prince of the Bush," and many a camera tourist or a Blesbok hunter may be easily excused to think that they are placid to a fault, looking contemptuously at trucks driving past at 200 yards or so, but the instant they realize they are the center of interest, things change...

So, by mid morning it was clear we were loosing 'hide & seek,' each time by a wider margin, and we called it quit. And as sometimes happen, by the time we were back down in the plain, cruising back without really hunting anymore, here he was, placidly walking in the complete open, not 300 yards away. Jason slammed on the brake - I have no idea how Henry and Strahli managed to not take flight and land on the hood - and we quickly glassed. Oh yes, it was him alright. I got out, Strahli jumped on my side with the sticks, Jason laboriously extracted himself on my side too - our Sable was placid alright, but there was no point insulting its intelligence and provoking him - and as he kept walking, we started walking too, keeping the truck between us. He walked in a semi circle to the left, about 250 yards away, we walked in a semi circle to the right, both turning around the Toyota like the short and long handles of a clock, and he stopped. Jason quickly spread the tripod of the spotting scope we had with us that morning, I quickly spread the tripod sticks, and got on them.

As mentioned earlier, this was during the first week. Jason and I had not developed yet the trust we built by the end of the two weeks in the little .257 Wby, so I had without a second thought grabbed the .340 Wby as I got off the truck. I know this rifle well. We have an interesting relationship. This is not a casual relationship. It is intense, highly competitive, it has been bloody once when we shot the Kudu together last year, and in the end it is ferociously simple: one of us is going to control and impose his (or its) will on the other. If I brace the big .340 right, if I control it tightly, if I remember that it will bark at me and try to bite me, it will do exactly what I want it to do, group its big 225 gr TTSX slugs within a inch at 100 yards, and kill whatever walks this earth out to 300 yard without a second thought. If I forget what furry I am about to unleash, and if I let the big .340 get in charge of the situation, I will miss a barn from the inside...

But that day I remembered that even though the .257 and the .340 look like twins in their matched pair, twins they are not. The big rifle went on the sticks, I shoved my banded earplugs deep in my ears, I grabbed it firmly as it likes to be grabbed, a big cartridge eased itself into the chamber, I took a deep breath, pulled the rifle deep and tight into my shoulder pocket, and "Hammir" (the hammer, as Strahli had nicknamed it last year) unleashed its furry on the creation.


When I do things right with the .340 Wby does things right too. No matter upon what, no matter how far (within reason of course, 300 to 350 yards being a good reasonable maximum distance in my judgment), no matter when or where, the big .33 slugs deliver incredible killing power. I used to shoot the .250 gr Nosler Partition exclusively (I did last year https://www.africahunting.com/threa...faris-august-2018-plains-game-paradise.45017/) but I have changed for the 225 gr TTSX. I@t flies flatter, it recoils 20% less, and it kills just as well, even though, just as with the .257, I do not have a nice petaled 225 gr .340 TTSX to show you. It is still flying in the Huntershill plain...

I had my beautiful Huntershill Sable...

View attachment 299580
@One Day...
That 340 Weatherby definitely puts them down. Well done.
Bob
 
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Wife and I each packed a Pelican 1650 (one tan and one army green) case and had no problems whatsoever.
Rifles were in a black Pelican 1750.
FYI the Pelican 1650 case is the largest you will be allowed to be used for checked baggage.
And by the way, empty it eats up 23# of your 50# limit.
We also use a 1510 as a carry-on.
@BeeMaa
Used normal luggage but rifles in a,1770 pelican double rifle case used up all 23# with it. They're Heavy-duty and provide excellent protection for you rifles.
Bob
 

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@BeeMaa
Used normal luggage but rifles in a,1770 pelican double rifle case used up all 23# with it. They're Heavy-duty and provide excellent protection for you rifles.
Bob
The Pelican Protector 1770 weighs in at 36# (16.3 kg)...empty.
That takes a huge chunk out of the 50# (23 kg) airline weight limit.

We are each taking a 1700 for rifles on our next trip.
Checked bags will be a 1560 and a 1510.
Ammo in a 1200 inside the checked bags (but might just take one).
Small day-pack for a carry on.

So one rifle case, one checked bag, one ammo box and one day pack per person.
And yes, I will probably end up carrying most of it. :rolleyes:
 

One Day...

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Wife and I each packed a Pelican 1650 (one tan and one army green) case and had no problems whatsoever.

Although you noted that they were overweight and you got nailed on one flight with an excess weight fee.
Checked bags will be a 1560 and a 1510.

I am curious BeeMaa. You had said in the past 1650 and in your last post you say 1560. Have you downsized your kit dramatically or is this a typo?

Suitcase

I used last year a 1605, but beside the mistake of having bought it in black color and getting it confused for a rifle case by all airline/TSA/custom employees, with exterior dimensions 28.87 x 16.77 x 9.12 = 54.76" it turned out to be a little too small ... and it does not have wheels, which turned out to be more an inconvenience than I thought after having to walk endlessly across terminals at NY JFK...

I looked at the 1650 you spoke of last year BeeMaa (Exterior Dimensions: 31.59 x 20.47 x 12.45 = total "size" 64.51", weight empty 24 lbs.) but I did not go with it because it exceeds the maximum 62" and at 24 lbs. empty it would likely exceed 50 lbs. full for me, as it did for you (it only leaves 15 lbs. available after the 11 lbs. of ammo box). I am convinced that sooner or later airlines will start enforcing systematically the max 62" and max 50 lbs. in order to generate additional revenues...

I was to take a 1615 this year. I bought it in silver color to reduce the risk of confusion black Pelican cases apparently create. With exterior dimensions 32.58" x 18.4" x 11.02" it comes right at the max 62" and after removing the retractable handle that is unnecessary because it is tall enough to be rolled along using the side handle, it weighs empty 12 lbs. 12oz, which means that even with the 11 lbs. 1150 ammo case in it, I still have 26 lbs. available and this all but guarantees that it will stay under the max 50 lbs. I know that it is an "Air" Pelican series, but owning both "Protector" and "Air" Pelicans, I am satisfied that the "Air" are plenty strong enough for suitcase use...

Looking at the 1560 your last post mentions BeeMaa, with exterior dimensions 22.07 x 17.92 x 10.42 = total "size" 50.4" it is even smaller than the 1605 I took last year. One better pack really light with it. Just mid-weight boots for Eastern Cape mountains and ammo will take half the space ;)

Rifle case

For rifles, I agree with the 1700. I replaced my 1750 with a 1700 because although the 1750 with 2 rifles came just below 50 lbs., with exterior dimensions 53.00 x 16.00 x 6.12 it comes to 75". Too big! I was not charged yet with an over-size fee, but a friend of mine was...
@BeeMaa
... rifles in a 1770 pelican double rifle case...
Bob
Woah, Bob, I admire your confidence. With my luck I would think that a 1770 that comes out to 87" and well over 60 lbs. with 2 African caliber rifles would be screaming "Charge me!" at every airline counter. In my case, with 3 flights each way, this could cost me over $500...

The 1700 easily takes my double .470 and one CZ 550 with a total size of 60" and a total weight of 41 lbs.
 
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BeeMaa

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Although you noted that they were overweight and you got nailed on one flight with an excess weight fee.


I am curious Beema. You had said in the past 1650 and in your last post you say 1560. Have you downsized your kit dramatically or is this a typo?

Suitcase

I used last year a 1605, but beside the mistake of having bought it in black color and getting it confused for a rifle case by all airline/TSA/custom employees, with exterior dimensions 28.87 x 16.77 x 9.12 = 54.76" it turned out to be a little too small ... and it does not have wheels, which turned out to be more an inconvenience than I thought after having to walk endlessly across terminals at NY JFK...

I looked at the 1650 you spoke of last year Beema (Exterior Dimensions: 31.59 x 20.47 x 12.45 = total "size" 64.51", weight empty 24 lbs.) but I did not go with it because it exceeds the maximum 62" and at 24 lbs. empty it would likely exceed 50 lbs. full for me (it only leaves 15 lbs. available after the 11 lbs. of ammo box), as it did for you. I am convinced that sooner or later airlines will start enforcing systematically the max 62" and max 50 lbs. in order to generate additional revenues...

I was to take a 1615 this year. I bought it in silver color to reduce the risk of confusion black Pelican cases apparently create. With exterior dimensions 32.58" x 18.4" x 11.02" it comes right at the max 62" and after removing the retractable handle that is unnecessary because it is tall enough to be rolled along using the side handle, it weighs empty 12 lbs. 12oz, which means that even with the 11 lbs. 1150 ammo case in it, I still have 26 lbs. available and this all but guarantees that it will stay under the max 50 lbs. I know that it is an "Air" Pelican series, but owning both "Protector" and "Air" Pelicans, I am satisfied that the "Air" are plenty strong enough for suitcase use...

Looking at the 1560 your last post mentions, with exterior dimensions 22.07 x 17.92 x 10.42 = total "size" 50.4" it is even smaller than the 1605 I took last year. One better pack really light with it. Just mid-weight boots for Eastern Cape mountains and ammo will take half the space ;)

Rifle case

For rifles, I agree with the 1700. I replaced my 1750 with a 1700 because although the 1750 with 2 rifles came just below 50 lbs., with exterior dimensions 53.00 x 16.00 x 6.12 it comes to 75". Too big!

Woah, Bob, I admire your confidence. With my luck I would think that a 1770 that comes out to 87" and well over 60 lbs. with 2 African caliber rifles would be screaming "Charge me!" at every airline counter. In my case, with 3 flights each way, this could cost me over $500...

The 1700 easily takes my double .470 and one CZ 550 with a total size of 60" and a total weight of 41 lbs.
Not a typo, and BTW good eye...most would not have caught that.
We had 2 of the 1650's and have downsized to one 1560.
The fact that the 1650 was right around the 65" mark...made it questionable.
Most airlines allow 62", and if they pulled out the tape...we'd be screwed.

Realizing we WAAAAAAY overpaked was a major factor.
So we downsized and sold the 1650's.
We can fit all we need in a 1560 and 1510 for checked luggage.
In a pinch the 1510 could be used as a carry-on, although also right at the limit.
 
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Although you noted that they were overweight and you got nailed on one flight with an excess weight fee.


I am curious BeeMaa. You had said in the past 1650 and in your last post you say 1560. Have you downsized your kit dramatically or is this a typo?

Suitcase

I used last year a 1605, but beside the mistake of having bought it in black color and getting it confused for a rifle case by all airline/TSA/custom employees, with exterior dimensions 28.87 x 16.77 x 9.12 = 54.76" it turned out to be a little too small ... and it does not have wheels, which turned out to be more an inconvenience than I thought after having to walk endlessly across terminals at NY JFK...

I looked at the 1650 you spoke of last year BeeMaa (Exterior Dimensions: 31.59 x 20.47 x 12.45 = total "size" 64.51", weight empty 24 lbs.) but I did not go with it because it exceeds the maximum 62" and at 24 lbs. empty it would likely exceed 50 lbs. full for me, as it did for you (it only leaves 15 lbs. available after the 11 lbs. of ammo box). I am convinced that sooner or later airlines will start enforcing systematically the max 62" and max 50 lbs. in order to generate additional revenues...

I was to take a 1615 this year. I bought it in silver color to reduce the risk of confusion black Pelican cases apparently create. With exterior dimensions 32.58" x 18.4" x 11.02" it comes right at the max 62" and after removing the retractable handle that is unnecessary because it is tall enough to be rolled along using the side handle, it weighs empty 12 lbs. 12oz, which means that even with the 11 lbs. 1150 ammo case in it, I still have 26 lbs. available and this all but guarantees that it will stay under the max 50 lbs. I know that it is an "Air" Pelican series, but owning both "Protector" and "Air" Pelicans, I am satisfied that the "Air" are plenty strong enough for suitcase use...

Looking at the 1560 your last post mentions BeeMaa, with exterior dimensions 22.07 x 17.92 x 10.42 = total "size" 50.4" it is even smaller than the 1605 I took last year. One better pack really light with it. Just mid-weight boots for Eastern Cape mountains and ammo will take half the space ;)

Rifle case

For rifles, I agree with the 1700. I replaced my 1750 with a 1700 because although the 1750 with 2 rifles came just below 50 lbs., with exterior dimensions 53.00 x 16.00 x 6.12 it comes to 75". Too big! I was not charged yet with an over-size fee, but a friend of mine was...

Woah, Bob, I admire your confidence. With my luck I would think that a 1770 that comes out to 87" and well over 60 lbs. with 2 African caliber rifles would be screaming "Charge me!" at every airline counter. In my case, with 3 flights each way, this could cost me over $500...

The 1700 easily takes my double .470 and one CZ 550 with a total size of 60" and a total weight of 41 lbs.
@one day
Pascal the 1770 with my scoped Whelen and my son's Howa 308 scoped came in at 22 kilos and 53 inches so no problems.
Empty it weighs just under 12 kilos.
Bob
 

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Bob, we must not be talking about the same Pelican case...

Pelican 1770 specifications are exterior dimensions: 57.42 + 18.48 + 11.23 = 87.13"; and weight empty: 36.01 lbs. (16.3 kg); weight with foam: 41.49 lbs (18.8 kg).

Are you sure you are not talking about the 1750 case (which is way more common - that is the one I own and used to take)? It does weigh 11.6 kg with foam, so this would match yours, and exterior length is 53", so this would match yours too.

However, the maximum 62" dimension we are talking about here is the airlines definition of maximum dimension, which is length + width + thickness. So for the purpose of our discussion, the 1750 maximum "airlines" dimension is 53.00 + 16.00 + 6.12 = 75.12".
Over-sized...

1601616356389.png
 
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Bob, we must not be talking about the same Pelican case...

Pelican 1770 specifications are exterior dimensions: 57.42 + 18.48 + 11.23 = 87.13"; and weight empty: 36.01 lbs. (16.3 kg); weight with foam: 41.49 lbs (18.8 kg).

Are you sure you are not talking about the 1750 case (which is way more common - that is the one I own and used to take)? It does weigh 11.6 kg with foam, so this would match yours, and exterior length is 53", so this would match yours too.

However, the maximum 62" dimension we are talking about here is the airlines definition of maximum dimension, which is length + width + thickness. So for the purpose of our discussion, the 1750 maximum "airlines" dimension is 53.00 + 16.00 + 6.12 = 75.12".
Over-sized...

View attachment 370156
@One Day...
It may be the 1750 because the dimensions you gave are pretty spot on, but I remember it coming with the 1770 tag on the handle. Also being an Ozzie it's the year captain Cook supposedly discovered Australia even tho us Aboriginal people never lost it. That's why I remember the tag. It is possible they put the wrong tag on it tho.
Bob
 
 

 

 

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