SOUTH AFRICA: A Return To Huntershill Safaris - Even Better Than Last Year!

One Day...

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This no bullet recovered, is getting to be a thing with you!!
:E Rofl:

It is part of the answer to the question for those who are interested in the .257 Wby performance, including you I think :)

I enjoyed your report immensely, after reading it I'm going to have to give the 257 Weatherby a second look. Seems like most of your shots were over 300 yds. Those years of training and competition paid off in spades.

All kidding aside, I had mused on AH before the trip about the possibilities that the new mono-metal bullets opened in terms of smaller caliber and lighter bullets (https://www.africahunting.com/threads/can-plains-game-a-frames-or-tsx-bullets-be-30-lighter.45537 and https://www.africahunting.com/threa...0-to-500-lbs-antelopes-opinions-please.45286/) and I must admit that I was really amazed at the killing power of the .25 caliber 100 gr TTSX in the .257 Wby. There might be something about that speed thing after all...

The quarter-sized exit holes (see Impala and Roan posts and upcoming Bontebok post) lead me to believe that they indeed expand quite uniformly, whether shot at 100 or 400 yards, or anywhere in between, and regardless of the animal weighing 100 or 600 lbs. I experienced 100% one-shot-kill reliability on 17 animals (I doubled on the Roan, but I am not sure it was really needed) with behind the shoulder double lung shots, but I would really have liked to see one of those TTSX after impact :(

And these small calibers and light bullets are soooo much easier to shoot than the big thumpers...
 
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Von S.

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Hello Pascal

Holy Smokes buddy......I am absolutely impressed..."Impressed" becaused you scienced the hell out of the situation of bullet type, weight and load and then took the time to practice to become proficent with the most rediculously meligned weapons of all timem yet you manage to score 17 "one shot-one kill" [ USMC SCOUT/SNIPER MOTTO ) on pg out to 400 yards +.

Your writting style is simply wonderful as everything you wrote held my attention and it all came off as guy who is wise as well as clever.

It is wonderful to read a detailed hunting report from a guy who doesn't throw a 5 gallon bucket of pompous, pretentious prattle, churned in with vomitous purple prose.:A Bang Head:

One hell of a job Pascal.
 

One Day...

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The ill-appreciated Tsessebe

I am not sure why the Tsessebe does not rank higher on most people's wish list when they book their Safari.

Is it because their horns are quite short in proportion to their body? Only 15 inches will get you in the Rowland Ward book of records. Or because their uniformly brown color is less attractive than other antelopes' wonderful combinations of black, brown, white? I do not know... I personally suspect that in a world of ever bigger, larger, longer trophies generated by supplemental feeding, genetic manipulation, selective breeding and constant emphasis on trophy quality, their meager headgear does not impress, and their claim to fame: being the fastest antelope in Africa with a top speed of over 90 km/h (56 mph) does not impress as much as does the headgear of a Kudu, Gemsbok or Sable.

I will admit that Tsessebe was not on my initial wish list when I booked my first Safari. Nor my second. Only for my third, did it pop on the radar screen, a little by default at first I must confess. It was a little bit of a 'what did I not get yet?' type of thinking. I then warmed up to the idea of the Tsessebe, and by the time Jason and I discussed the following day's Tsessebe hunt, I was as excited as I have ever been for any other animal.

Tsessebe like grasslands, open plains, and lightly wooded savannas habitat, so we would be hunting Tsessebe in the Huntershill plain, and Jason decided that we would explore the south end of the valley flats, toward Heuningklip, with a close look at the wet lands near Rhenosterhoek. Since Tsessebe seldom live below 1,5oo meters (5,000 feet) elevation and are short grass grazers, Huntershill offers a near perfect habitat for them.

The wet lands proved not very wet this August 2019, as barely mud remained from them, but because mature Tsessebe males weigh in the 300 lbs. range, there were a number of deep tracks confirming the presence of some big males. We started cruising slowly on the plain, following the terrain undulations.

Springbok, Blesbok, Impala were flushing right and left, but Tsessebe were rare. Or maybe I did not look far enough initially, because when Jason said "There!" I did not realize he was meaning 'all the way out there', as in 'on the horizon'. But Tsessebe they were, and I soon understood that they are not only fast, but also considerably shy. "Hmmm, that will be interesting," I thought.

I could barely distinguish horns on them, both males and females have them, and the differences between them are not obvious to novice eyes - this was my first Tsessebe hunt - and we were far, but Jason soon said "this one is very good."

Jason then engaged in this very peculiar African hunting driving, where it always seemed that we were driving away from the game, but we were actually constantly reducing our distance from it. This worked. All the way until we reached the vertical banks of a dry run off, that we could not cross directly. It took a bit of exploring to find a path into the wash, and some ingenuous 4x4 driving on a steeply slopping tangent to get out of it on the other side, after following the bottom for a while.

Unwittingly, we emerged relatively close to the Tsessebe we wanted to take a closer look at, and Jason killed the engine and glassed intently. I could clearly see the broad shoulders, the thick neck, and a general masculine silhouette. Yes there were horns on it, but were they good? I had no idea. I did notice something strange about them. There was a sort of bulge in the middle of one of them. "What with the horn?" I asked. "I think it is a mud clot," replied Jason. I am always amazed how Jason sees in a pair of 10x binoculars what I would need a pair of 15x to resolve. "He is good," Jason added, "let's go for him," he concluded.

He was about 400 yards away, and fixated on the Toyota. We left the truck where it was, in full view, to continue to capture his attention, and started a low crouch to try to reduce the distance. Within minutes my thighs were burning, my back was locking, and the Tsessebe clearly was not fooled by our stratagem. Jason, and Strahli could have probably approached him in that manner, low to the ground, all the way to slap his butt, but I could only manage a poor excuse of a crouch.

But the Leica range finder was encouraging: 375, 360, 355, the distance was slowly decreasing. At about 335 or 325, I do not remember, we were close enough. Jason deployed the sticks very wide and very low, I got on both knees, a very unusual position for me, got on the sticks, hurriedly pushed a cartridge into the chamber, engaged the safety, took three deep breaths to quiet my heart, breathing in through the nose, exhaling through the mouth, the crosshair stabilized, the safety vanished, and the .257 Wby barked.

I saw a wave of skin wrinkle behind his shoulder where the bullet hit. A solid "whonk!" came back to us. He took two hesitant steps and collapsed. By the time we reached him, he was long dead.

He was plastered with dry mud, he was dark brown, he was different, he was beautiful. I loved him.

Tsessebe.JPG

A beautiful Huntershill Tsessebe. Ill-appreciated no more.
 
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One Day...

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I only do European skull mounts. Figure in average $150 per head, including a nice plaque.
I prefer to spend the $6,000 or $8,000 going back, rather than doing mounts ;)
I use Umlindi Taxidermy.
 

One Day...

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Do you have a Bontebok?

Oh Good Lord! This is how trouble starts!

"No, I do not have a Bontebok," I replied with considerable feeling to Jason's question.

But this was not a malicious question. Jason is not the kind of PH who will push you to shoot just to rack up the bill. We were genuinely looking at a very nice Bontebok when he asked me, "Do you have a Bontebok?" Actually, Jason is the kind of PH who will encourage you NOT to shoot if he does not feel that it is right. Jason prides himself associating his name with great hunts, unforgettable memories, and great animals.

We were hunting hard that afternoon for ... a diminutive Duiker. We actually had been hunting hard, for several days, for a Duiker. My friends saw them daily, the other PHs were routinely swerving widely their hunting trucks to avoid running them over, clients at the lodge confirmed having to kick them out of their way to be able to move forward in the bush, everyone was complaining about a general infestation of Duiker ... but we just could not manage to see one !?!? In fact, we never saw one this year, save for a young that was way too immature to collect. So, here we go, I guess I need to go back next year...

So, that afternoon, we had the Toyota stopped in ambush inside the edge of the bush, and we were glassing intently, across a wide opening, the opposite bush edge where Duiker like to busy themselves. And there walked, in the middle of it, this group of Bontebok with a great one in the back. "He is really good," said Jason.

What could I do?

I eased out of the truck, grabbing my tiny daypack. I always have a tiny daypack in the truck. It is not a CamelBak, but you get the idea. It is actually a tiny 16" x 8" x 3" Rothco Quickstrike pack just big enough to carry my 'possible bag' with IFAK (Individual First Aid Kit - old military habits die hard), headlamp, spare batteries, range finder spare battery, spare shoe laces, spare reading glasses, compass, lighter, pocket knife, lens brush and pre-moist lens cleaning wipes, toilet paper, a length of paracord; and a quart size canteen with purification tablets. I also put in the rear outside pocket a folded Gore-Tex rain jacket, because it occasionally rains (or snows!) during the African winter in Huntershill. It comes in at about 3 lbs., which is nothing, and I automatically put it on when we leave the truck. Actually, this is not true. Strahli automatically puts it on when we leave the truck. I started doing it last year, and after a few days Strahli just put it on one day, with a smile at me. We never renegotiated it. In 24 days of hunting at Huntershill I have never opened it, which is fine, but it has proved priceless, many times, especially last year when we hunted the mountain a lot, as a near perfect rifle rest on top of a boulder.

So I eased out of the truck, grabbing my tiny daypack, dropped it on the hood of the Toyota, at the perfect height to provide a rock solid shooting rest. A quick consultation with the Leica range finder confirmed my estimation. Something like 285 yards if memory serves. "Really good?" I whispered to Jason before committing, "really good," he whispered back. The die was cast...

The little .257 Weatherby took over. It settled nicely, a cartridge found its way silently into its chamber, and it did its thing, with its now usual, ruthless efficiency.

DSC01633.JPG

The little .257 Weatherby did its thing, with its now usual, ruthless efficiency.

As previously stated, when the Gods of the Hunt smile upon you, you do not kick them in the teeth. You say thank you gracefully and you accept the gift.

Bontebok.JPG

A beautiful, unexpected, Huntershill Bontebok that showed up in the right place at the right time...
 
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One Day...

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Yes. It is a factory issued, Saco Defense USA made, Stainless Steel Mark V, circa late 1990.s early 2000's.

So is the .340.

These are, in my mind, the most desirable all weather Weatherby. True stainless steel, as opposed to the current silver-coated carbon steel Weathermark; stainless steel machined metal bottom, as opposed to the 'pot metal' cast current bottoms; solid barrels, as opposed to the current fluted, light barrels.

Both the .257 and .340 shoot ~1 MOA with a variety of loads: 100 gr TTSX, 100 gr Norma Spitzer, 225 TTSX, 250 gr Nosler Partition.

.257 Wby 100 gr Barnes TTSX group.jpg

.257 Wby 100 gr Norma Spitzer group.jpg

.340 Wby 225 gr Barnes TTSX group.jpg

.340 Wby 250 gr Nosler Partition group.jpg



By the way, these are not benchrest targets carefully shot for group size, but hunting-rest targets shot for field-conditions scope sighting. Both rifles are capable of significantly smaller groups.

They both wear the same Bell & Carlson Medalist synthetic stocks with full length aluminum bedding chassis, and the same 2.5-10 x 48 Zeiss Diavari Z T* scopes in the same Talley mounts. The .340 purposefully has a 1/2 inch longer length of pull (bigger recoil), but otherwise the two rifles come as close to a matched pair as possible, including weight (10 lbs. 11 oz, which, to me, is about perfect for the right combination of portability, stability, and recoil absorption).

DSC01436.JPG


Since these targets were shot, I have been using a Leica 2000 B range finder with integrated ballistic program. I re-sighted both rifles to a 300 yards zero. This means a sighting of +2" @ 100 yd for the .257 100 gr TTSX, and +3" @ 100 yards for the .340 225 gr TTSX.

These are the sightings I used in Huntershill this year, and this essentially means a peak trajectory of +3" @ 150 to 200 yards for the .257, and +4" @ 150 to 200 yards for the .340, which is perfect for the game size for which each is intended, and a MPBR of about 330 yards for both.

This essentially makes both rifles "point & click" out to ~325 yards, and there is no brainstorming switching from one to the other depending on game size, although I will admit that I am going to think long and hard before deciding to bring the .340 along again, unless a monster Eland or such is on the package...
 
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mark-hunter

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Pascal
You have hunted almost all main plains game species available at Soth Africa!

What is the next step, maybe for next year? What are the plans?

Shall we read next year about buffalo?
 

BeeMaa

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Pascal - how do you tell the difference between a Blesbok and Bontebok?
I thought the Bontebok had a white strip that connected the white between the horns to the nose, where the Blesbok doesn't.
I'm not suggesting you took a Blesbok and I know the white strip isn't the only deciding factor.
Just looking for some clarification and I mean no disrespect.
 
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cpr0312

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Congrats on the Lechwe!!
 

One Day...

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Pascal
You have hunted almost all main plains game species available at Soth Africa!

What is the next step, maybe for next year? What are the plans?

Shall we read next year about buffalo?

Well, that was Safari #2...

Cape Buffalo.JPG
 

One Day...

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Pascal - how do you tell the difference between a Blesbok and Bontebok?
I thought the Bontebok had a white strip that connected the white between the horns to the nose, where the Blesbok doesn't.
I'm not suggesting you took a Blesbok and I know the white strip isn't the only deciding factor.
Just looking for some clarification and I mean no disrespect.
You are completely correct, Eric, this is supposed to be one of the textbook telltale signs.

Typically, Blesbok are significantly lighter in color; they are of a somewhat uniform light brown; their white hair is a little yellowish; most distinctively, they have a brown band between the eyes that divides the white patches on their lower and upper face; and their horns are straw-colored on the upper ringed surface.

Conversely, Bontebok have much darker flanks, head and upper legs; their back is of a different light brown color; the white on their face is whiter; most distinctively, they have a white line between the eyes that connects the white patches on their lower and upper face; and their horns are very dark brown, almost black.

In my case, my 2018 Huntershill Blesbok is indeed light in color; of a somewhat uniform brown; his white hair is a little yellowish; his horns are straw-colored on the upper ringed surface - all good so far - BUT, his brown band between the eyes is very faded and he has a trace of continuous white line on the face (see second picture), like the Bontebok is supposed to have !?!?!?

Blesbok.JPG


DSC00564a.JPG


Conversely, my 2019 Huntershill Bontebok has much darker flanks, head and upper legs, almost black actually; the white on his face is much whiter (see second picture); his horns are really dark - all good so far - BUT, he indeed has a dark brown band between the eyes, although narrowing toward the middle, that divides the white patches on its lower and upper face, like the Blesbok is supposed to have !?!?!?

Bontebok.JPG


DSC01633b.JPG


I do not know which of the physical characteristics are supposed to be the most important: two tone color vs. connecting white face patches vs. pure white vs. horns color, and I do not know if they bear exceptions.
 
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IvW

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Pascal - how do you tell the difference between a Blesbok and Bontebok?
I thought the Bontebok had a white strip that connected the white between the horns to the nose, where the Blesbok doesn't.
I'm not suggesting you took a Blesbok and I know the white strip isn't the only deciding factor.
Just looking for some clarification and I mean no disrespect.



Bontebok



Blesbok

Main difference in appearance is the overall colour. Blesbuck rams have more yellow horns as apposed to black in the Bontebok. The Bontebok is overall darker, has the continues blaze and the large white rump. If they do not look like the above they are hybrids.

As for hunting them.

All pure Bontebok herds need to be registered.

It is also a CITES II species and listed as Endangered by the US Endangered Species Act (ESA). USF&W requires you to apply for additional import permit if you are a US hunter who wants to take the trophy home.

At the South African end, when a hunting client expresses a wish to hunt a Bontebok, the landowner must apply for a TOPS permit in the client's name. The valid TOPS permit must in your hand when you are hunting. Always check the TOPS permit yourself before hunting for any discrepancy in your details. Never shoot a Bontebok (or any other TOPS animal) without seeing the permit first. Never allow yourself to hunt and shoot a TOPS animal on the promise of getting a TOPS permit afterwards.

If you definitely want to hunt a Bontebok, you must ensure that the hunting area, on which you aim to hunt the Bontebok is registered with the South African Bontebok management program.

This is import to find out before hand because when you complete the Federal Fish and Wildlife Permit Application Form 3-200-22 For Import of Sport Hunted Bontebok Trophies from South Africa, you will need to enter the full details of the landowner on whose property the Bontebok will be taken.

You will also need a signed statement from the landowner giving you permission to cull a Bontebok from their captive herd OR a copy of the landowner's Certification of Registration for the Bontebok herd.

If the Bontebok landowner is not officially registered to keep and allow the hunting of Bontebok, USF&W will refuse permission for you to import the trophy. USF&W have a list and will check the registered Bontebok landowners.

You need to complete and submit the Bontebok permit application at least 90 days before the hunt starts.

Your outfitter will organise the CITES II export permit with the local Game Department. CITES II export permits have an 6 month validity, so the trophy will need to be exported within the time frame. Any delays with the export or if the shipping date is too close to the CITES expiry date, the CITES permit will need to be re-issued.

Check the date when the USF&W Bontebok permit expires and don't let the trophy be shipped if the permit has expired or is to close for comfort to the shipping time. The import permit has a 1 year validity and if it expires before the trophy is due, you can always re-apply for it to be re-issued.

It is very important that the Bontebok is assigned the correct scientific name on the USF&W import permit and CITES II export permit. As with the Blesbok, the Bontebok was re-classified and is now known as Damaliscus pygargus pygargus. It used to be Damaliscus dorcas dorcas which is still commonly used in reference to the Bontebok by many authorities. USF&W use the name Damaliscus pygargus pygargus, so check this matches on the South African CITES export permit, veterinary permit and any other shipping documents. You don't want this seemingly small detail to cause your import to be rejected.

Apart from all the paperwork and permit requirements, they are the same to hunt as Blesbok
 

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BeeMaa

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Pascal & IvW - Thank you both so much for this information.
We harvested a Blesbok on our last Safari...made me think I may want to hunt Bontebok.
After seeing the loops to jump through to import the trophy, and the cost of the animal...I may go another direction.

But I do have to say that they are absolutely BEAUTIFUL animals.
Congratulations on yours.
 

One Day...

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... After seeing the loops to jump through to import the trophy...I may go another direction...

Actually BeeMaa, considering your response, let me add two things to complete the information that IvW copied from Shakari Connection.

1- The language used by Shakari Connection and copied by IvW states: "You need to complete and submit the bontebok permit application at least 90 days before the hunt starts." Actually, this is incorrect.
The language used on the USFWS Permit To Import Of Sport-Hunted Bontebok Trophies From South Africa is: "Allow at least 90 days for the application to be processed." Note 4 of the USFWS application states: "This application can only be used if you have hunted/will be hunting in South Africa." Question #4c of the application asks: "What is the date you took the animal?" Statement #10 says: "I acknowledge that the sport-hunted trophy/trophies to be imported has been/will be personally hunted by me." Clearly, the application to import can be filed after the hunt.
For information, the US Fish & Wildlife (USFWS) application is located at https://www.fws.gov/international/permits/by-activity/sport-hunted-trophies-bontebok.html

2- The South Africa Environmental Affairs Department Threatened Or Protected Species (TOPS) permit is issued on site by Huntershill. It only costs R100 for hunting and R50 for export if you want to export the trophy (total ~ $10 US). Issuance is immediate, just as is the issuance of the general hunting license.

So there is zero admin loop to jump through if you decide to hunt a Bontebok at Huntershill, and the admin loops to jump through to import it in the US - if you wish to do so - are not all that bad :)
 
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IvW

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2- The South Africa Environmental Affairs Department Threatened Or Protected Species (TOPS) permit is issued on site by Huntershill. It only costs R100 for hunting and R50 for export if you want to export the trophy (total ~ $10 US). Issuance is immediate, just as is the issuance of the general hunting license.

So there is zero admin loop to jump through if you decide to hunt a Bontebok at Huntershill, and the admin loops to jump through to import it in the US - if you wish to do so - are not all that bad :)

Really?

First question is the property and owner a registered Bontebok breeder with the South African Government?

If not they are hybrids and cannot legally be sold or exported as Bontebok as simple as that...neither will permits be issued....

Why would anybody go to all the trouble and expense to hunt a so called Bontebok if it is not one?
Why would somebody hunt it if it does not even look like one?

Many animals cross breed and hybridize and are hunted, but they cannot be made as either the one or the other.

In order to hunt a Bontebok and export it from SA to USA you need the following, failing which the trophy cannot be legally exported or imported.

1. Cites permit.

Please be aware that the bontebok is listed in Appendix II of CITES. As such, you must obtain a CITES export permit from South Africa. If you are not exporting the trophy from South Africa directly to the United States, you will need to obtain a CITES Re-export certificate from the re-exporting country. 6. Attach a signed statement from the landowner giving you permission to cull a bontebok from their captive herd. 7. If available, provide a copy of the landowner’s Certification of Registration for the bontebok herd. (Note: this is not a copy of the export permit or certificate issued by a South African province.)

In order to meet the criteria for a permit under the Endangered Species Act, the bontebok must be culled from a ranch that has been certified by the Government of South Africa under their bontebok program. If the ranch is not registered on the date you take the bontebok, we may be unable to issue an import permit.

Best to get CITES 1 and 2 BEFORE you conduct the hunt....

https://www.cites.org/eng/disc/how.php

2. US FWS Permit 3-200-22
Import of Hunted Bontebok from South Africa
South Africa has an established management program that allows for controlled hunts of male bontebok from registered captive herds. If you are requesting to import bontebok trophies for your own personal use from South Africa, you should complete application form 3-200-22.


Note 3:The bontebok is listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. Applications for endangered species permits must be published in the Federal Register for a 30-day public comment period. Allow at least 90 days for the application to be processed.

https://www.fws.gov/international/permits/by-activity/sport-hunted-trophies-bontebok.html

3. Tops permit

Here is the proper procedure to follow to legally import a Bontebok trophy and frequently asked questions, of course you can take shortcuts and many do but it is not advised....

Importing Your Bontebok Sport Hunted Trophy
The bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus dorcas) is an antelope that historically occurred in the Western Cape of the Republic of South Africa. It became nearly extinct from overhunting and loss of habitat due to expanding agricultural needs. The bontebok population went from a low of 20 specimens in 1930 to more than 2,500 today. The Republic of South Africa’s Department of Nature and Environmental Conservation established a management program in the early 1980’s to encourage private game ranchers to breed and maintain bontebok herds. The management plan allows controlled hunts of excess males from registered captive herds to provide an economic incentive to ranchers for maintaining bontebok populations and their habitat.

Do I need a permit?
Yes. The bontebok is protected in Appendix II under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and is listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA).

To import your botebok into the US, you need a CITES export permit from the Republic of South Africa Management Authority and an endangered species import permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Division of Management Authority (DMA) prior to bringing a personal sport-hunted bontebok trophy into the United States.

Why are permits necessary?
The main purpose of CITES and the ESA is to conserve protected wildlife for future generations. The issuance of permits is used to monitor the international movement of wildlife in trade. For species protected under the ESA and included in Appendix II, permits ensure specimens will be:
■ legally acquired.
■ imported and exported in a manner that will enhance the survival of the species.
■consistent with country harvest limits and have no detrimental effects on wild populations.

The Service has determined that the limited hunting of male bontebok through controlled hunts on ranches that participate in South Africa’s management program will enhance the survival of the bontebok, provided that trophies are imported by the person who hunted them and are for his or her own personal use. The Republic of South Africa registers private game ranches to ensure they maintain pure-bred bontebok herds.

How does the Service know which game ranches are registered?
The Republic of South Africa periodically sends the Service a list of game ranches that are part of their bontebok management program. If you apply for an import permit for an animal taken from a ranch that does not appear on the list, and South Africa cannot confirm the ranch is registered, your permit request cannot be approved.

How long will it take to get an import permit?
Apply for a permit at least 90 days before your departure. Under the ESA, the receipt of applications must be published in the Federal Register to allow the public 30 days to comment on the proposed import.

What should I know before I go hunting?
■ Confirm that the game ranch on which you propose to hunt is registered with South Africa’s bontebok management program.
■ Obtain a letter from the landowner giving you permission to hunt a male bontebok on his/her property. Send a copy with your import permit application.
■ Understand and be aware of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s requirement that to import your bontebok into the US, an import permit for a bontebok trophy may only be issued for your own personal use.
■ If you are considering buying wildlife souvenirs, check with the DMA to determine if you will be allowed to import them.

What steps should I take?
■ Obtain an import permit from DMA by submitting application form 3-200-22 (www.fws.gov/forms/3-200-22.pdf). The permit does not need to be issued before you go on your hunt. However, if it has, you may want to take a copy of your permit when you leave on safari to provide to your outfitter.
■ Leave the original permit at home as you will need to present it at the time the trophy is imported into the United States.
■ Comply with all foreign laws during your hunt.
■ Obtain a CITES export permit from the Management Authority of South Africa prior to importing the trophy.
■ Check expiration dates on your import and export permits before having the trophy shipped to you.
You could lose your trophy if it enters the United States after your permits have expired. Import permits are for six months, as required by CITES. If the import permit expires before the trophy is imported, you need to apply for a new permit. Return the original unused permit, a renewal application form (3-200-52;www.fws.gov/forms/3-200-52.pdf) and the processing fee. Allow at least 30 days for processing.
■ Import through a United States port designated for wildlife (www.fws.gov/ le/ImpExp/Contact_Info_Ports.htm). Please be aware that there may be inspection fees at the time of import.
■ Speak with the Service wildlife inspector at the port of entry to arrange for inspection at least 72
hours prior to import. At the time of import, you will need to present the original import and export permits, as well as a completed Declaration for Importation or Exportation of Fish or Wildlife (Form 3-177), obtained at the port directly or by visiting the following website: www.fws.gov/le/ImpExp/Info_Importers_Exporters.htm.

Source: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service International Affairs - Oct. 2012
 

One Day...

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Yes, the Huntershill herd is registered.

Yes, there is paperwork to fill, but it does not look to me much more daunting than the SAPS 520 10 page application to temporarily import a rifle in RSA.

To each his own :)
 

IvW

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Yes, the Huntershill herd is registered.

Yes, there is paperwork to fill, but it does not look to me much more daunting than the SAPS 520 10 page application to temporarily import a rifle in RSA.

To each his own :)

Yip, to each his own...

Personally I would not hunt a hybrid and call it a Bontebok...
 

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