Hornady eld-x field reviews

Discussion in 'Hunting Africa' started by Nelsonc0, May 2, 2016.

  1. ActionBob

    ActionBob AH ENABLER SILVER SUPPORTER AH Legend

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,640
    Video/Photo:
    82
    Likes Received:
    5,307
    Location:
    Central Minnesota
    Member of:
    NRA life, DSC, SCI
    Hunted:
    Minnesota, Texas, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, British Columbia, Argentina, Kansas, Macedonia, Austria
    In the case of my Kimber 300 WSM, 200 grain shoot much tighter groups than 180's do. So in this case 200's are much better. Otherwise I agree in principle on a good 180 grain.
     

  2. Chago

    Chago AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Messages:
    199
    Video/Photo:
    54
    Likes Received:
    267
    I know this is old but I'll jump in as I just found it. And it sounds like no one has used it on African game as of yet.

    I personally use the eld X in my 300 win mag. I'm shooting the 212 with 71.5 grains of 7828.

    I have shot 3 elk, and 2 Canadian moose with that set up. Moose being larger and thicker skinned then any PG I believe. All 5 of these animals died either in the same spot or went down within 50 yards. So because of this I felt like it would work just fine in Africa.

    2018 when I went to RSA I shot a Sable, kudu, gemsbok, nyala, blue wildebeest, Impala, blesbok and zebra. And my PH made jokes about the lack of tracking required.

    Yes it is a soft bullet designed for long range shooting. I had no shots in Africa under 125m. So the really close range I can't speak for. And yes the bullet does expand massively. But that massive expansion is basically a KE dump. Causing devastating damage inside. So if the bullet is placed correctly. You don't need a exit wound. As the internal damage is so bad. The organs will pool with blood so quickly the animal will lay with 50 yards of where you shot it. And that's on the long end. Almost everything I shot in Africa died within 10 yards. And for the guys afraid of bone shots. In Africa I admittedly was not worrying about meat damage. So I was shooting high shoulder on every animal. And it broke through everyone one of the above species shoulders.

    As per the elk and moose I hunt locally. I tuck them behind the shoulder as I'm meat hunting and the same performance. Once I missed on a moose a little forward and actually smacking him right on the should blade. The moose ran like 30 yards and stopped as the internal damage was still so devastating. Broke the shoulder and still got deep enough in the organs with the KE dump. As he stood there wobbling I gave him a second just in case. And he fell immediately.

    I think regardless of what bullet style you go with. Obviously other than varmint. As long as your making the right shots in the right spot then you shouldn't have a issue.
     
    Hogpatrol likes this.

  3. PHOENIX PHIL

    PHOENIX PHIL AH ENABLER AH Ambassador

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2009
    Messages:
    8,739
    Video/Photo:
    53
    Likes Received:
    6,509
    Member of:
    SCI
    Hunted:
    USA, S. Africa
    Bullet placement will always be important regardless of bullet design or style. But a frangible bullet on large game isn't my first choice ever. A frangible bullet at high speed on large game is just asking for trouble, regardless of placement.

    In your case you said you used a 212gr bullet. Out of your .300WM, that would mean roughly a 2700fps muzzle velocity and quite slower than that on a 125m shot. So you kept the bullet within a reasonable impact velocity such that you killed your animals. I think that's important to note here.

    But as others have noted why risk it on a trip to Africa? There are other choices in tougher bullets.
     
    Chago likes this.

  4. Terry Blauwkamp

    Terry Blauwkamp AH Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2008
    Messages:
    73
    Video/Photo:
    1
    Likes Received:
    22
    Location:
    Michigan
    Member of:
    SCI, Dallas Safari Club, NRA
    Hunted:
    Zimbabwe, Nambia, & South Africa
    I have used the 200 gr ELD-X in the 300 Win Mag. , and found them a bit "soft" for shots under 250-300 yards.

    Beyond that they held together better, and did a fine job.
     

  5. TheWhitetailNut

    TheWhitetailNut AH Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2012
    Messages:
    74
    Video/Photo:
    4
    Likes Received:
    75
    Location:
    Valparaiso, In.
    Hunted:
    Ontario, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Florida, New Mexico, Namibia
    Usually heavier bullets are for larger game, not so with the ELD-X. The weight is to drive up the ballistic coefficient. They would be wonderous on antelopes through Gemsbok but I think even on Kudu you will be limited on shot angle. They are designed for long range and lower impact velocities and will shed significant weight up close.
     

  6. Chago

    Chago AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Messages:
    199
    Video/Photo:
    54
    Likes Received:
    267
    I have them running at 2825fps out the pipe. But your right outside of a 100 your falling down to around 2600 and less. Which could be the very reason I'm getting better performance. And my kudu was at 550m so velocity would be around 2100 if my math is right.

    But that being said the red stag I shot last year was very close, 60-70m max. And it ran in 20 yard circle and fell where it was originally shot. Shot was beyond the shoulder into the vitals. And a red stag as you might know is a tough animal and around 500-600lbs. About the same as kudu in body size and structure.

    Now in regards to shots on angles and such. You very well could be right. That's a shot I rarely take. Personally I enjoy long range shooting and hunting. I know some guys frown on that but to each your own. So typically with that sort of hunting. One wouldn't take funny quartering shots like you would in a fast shooting bush style hunt.

    And your all right. Almost always the eldx fragments when I recover them. And again that's part of the KE dump. I think everyone fear is that it happens too early on heavier skinned game. I have just yet to see that happen.

    In may when I head back to Africa. I'm tackling a kudu and eland. I'll for sure do a report on the eland in particular to see the performance.
     

  7. PHOENIX PHIL

    PHOENIX PHIL AH ENABLER AH Ambassador

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2009
    Messages:
    8,739
    Video/Photo:
    53
    Likes Received:
    6,509
    Member of:
    SCI
    Hunted:
    USA, S. Africa
    To each his own, but I believe with thousands of dollars wrapped up in the hunt, I'll stick with tougher bullets. I have no experience with the ELD, but I do with North Fork bonded, TSX and seen A-Frames used. These bullets on larger game didn't necessarily give an exit wound. If not, they were found underneath the skin on the offside.

    Only excessive tracking jobs took place on poor shot placement, save for one animal that was a quartering away shot.

    Again I won't make this comment specific to the ELD but Mr. Nosler developed the Partition for a reason.
     
    ShortMag likes this.

  8. Ndumo Hunting Safaris

    Ndumo Hunting Safaris SPONSOR Since 2016 AH Enthusiast

    Joined:
    May 6, 2009
    Messages:
    479
    Video/Photo:
    1,008
    Likes Received:
    453
    Location:
    Namibia
    Member of:
    NAPHA, SCI, DSC, SAHCA
    Hunted:
    Namibia, Zimbabwe, RSA, USA, Hungary
    Sir, I may be late to this party, but I have used them a lot in my 6.5mm Creedmoor (143gr) on loads of warthog (around 80..) and on plus minus 25 other plains game species, ranging from springbok to kudu, and they worked excellent! Admittedly, most were head-shots, but even on body shots they perform better than I would have thought. They seem quite "hard", and the few recovered, looked good enough that I would recommend them to a hunter in .300 Win Mag on a plains game hunt.
    I will dig for some pictures tomorrow morning if you would like.
     
    Chago likes this.

Share This Page

 
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice