Bullet Performance Database

I also used 150 gr Barnes tsx out my tikka 270 @ 2600 fps on springbucks. The distance was 121 ms the bullet did not really open like advertise the shot was a texas heart shot and the bullet stop in the heart . The springbuck did drop just there
Some more pictures of the 150 grain tsx 270 . quick questioned how far must the petals roll back on barnes tsx what would you guys say is a failure to open ?

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If I’m understanding things correctly, in a previous post you said you were using a 150 grain Barnes bullet in a Tikka .270 @ 2600 fps.
Some more pictures of the 150 grain tsx 270 . quick questioned how far must the petals roll back on barnes tsx what would you guys say is a failure to open ?

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in your post on page 34 you said you were using a 150 grain Barnes bullet in a Tikka .270 @ 2600 fps. If I’m understanding this correctly and that’s the muzzle velocity, it looks to be 100 feet slower than the minimum charge the Barnes book shows and 3-400 fps slower than what is possible. Pardon me if I have this all wrong but you’re doing your best to set this bullet up for failure or at least not picture perfect performance. It needs speed!
Along with this, I’d say you’re gaining nothing by shooting 150 grain Barnes bullets in a .270. Try 130s and drive them fast. 3150fps fast.
Same with the .375. Drive 270 grain Barnes TXSs as fast as you can and kill everything a 300 grain lead bullet ever did. I get it, I’m a heavy for caliber bullet guy myself but in the case of all copper bullets, drop down a weight class or two and you’ll lose neither penetration or bullet performance.
 
Same with the .375. Drive 270 grain Barnes TXSs as fast as you can and kill everything a 300 grain lead bullet ever did. I get it, I’m a heavy for caliber bullet guy myself but in the case of all copper bullets, drop down a weight class or two and you’ll lose neither penetration or bullet performance.
Not sure if you are looking to hunt DG, but in general a sectional density (SD) above .300 is desired vs being below that. I'd have no problem hunting elk, black bear or even PG with a .375 caliber 270 grain bullet...but for DG, I'm going to stick with 300 grains as a minimum for the 375H&H.

Barnes TSX .375 caliber 270 grain has a .274 SD
Barnes TSX .375 caliber 300 grain has a .305 SD

The 300 grain bullet at 2550-2600 fps will get the job done quite well as evidenced by many others on this thread.

Want something even better for DG? How about a .375 caliber 350 grain TSX bullet that ups the sectional density to .356 and send them at 2250 to 2300 fps. At DG distances of less 50 yards or less, it's gonna be good.

I'll end by saying shot placement is the largest factor in quickly taking down anything from a chipmunk to an elephant. Whatever you decide to use, make sure you know where it's going BEFORE you pull the trigger.
 
Hornady .264 140 grain Interlock. Impact velocity 2580 fps. Retained weight 85 grains. Slight quartering-to shot, bullet impacted shoulder and bisected heart, stopped just under the skin on far side. Deer collapsed on impact and never got back up. (He may have kicked a few times but I couldn't really see since he was below the weeds when on his side).

Side notes: I like (prefer?) the terminal performance of cup-and-core bullets on deer size game. The majority of deer just drop at the shot even with the little 100 grain spire point from my 250 savage. Occasionally one will stumble forward a few yards then fall down.

I would NOT use these on anything larger than mule deer though. Hornady has it listed as a "large game 300-1500 lbs" bullet on their website. I'm sure it's been done but I wouldn't.

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Hornady .264 140 grain Interlock. Impact velocity 2580 fps. Retained weight 85 grains. Slight quartering-to shot, bullet impacted shoulder and bisected heart, stopped just under the skin on far side. Deer collapsed on impact and never got back up. (He may have kicked a few times but I couldn't really see since he was below the weeds when on his side).

Side notes: I like (prefer?) the terminal performance of cup-and-core bullets on deer size game. The majority of deer just drop at the shot even with the little 100 grain spire point from my 250 savage. Occasionally one will stumble forward a few yards then fall down.

I would NOT use these on anything larger than mule deer though. Hornady has it listed as a "large game 300-1500 lbs" bullet on their website. I'm sure it's been done but I wouldn't.
@Rimshot
The plane Jane interlocks seem to work well. I have switched to the fancy SSTs that are just interlocks with a Plastic hat. To me they seem to drop game like pigs and deer even better. The 150gn SST is my go to bullet in my son's 308 and my 25 really loves them.
Bob
 
Hornady .264 140 grain Interlock. Impact velocity 2580 fps. Retained weight 85 grains. Slight quartering-to shot, bullet impacted shoulder and bisected heart, stopped just under the skin on far side. Deer collapsed on impact and never got back up. (He may have kicked a few times but I couldn't really see since he was below the weeds when on his side).

Side notes: I like (prefer?) the terminal performance of cup-and-core bullets on deer size game. The majority of deer just drop at the shot even with the little 100 grain spire point from my 250 savage. Occasionally one will stumble forward a few yards then fall down.

I would NOT use these on anything larger than mule deer though. Hornady has it listed as a "large game 300-1500 lbs" bullet on their website. I'm sure it's been done but I wouldn't.

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I’m also a huge fan of cup and core bullets for whitetail. They just kill fast compared to some of the premium bullets I’ve used on deer.
 
I’m also a huge fan of cup and core bullets for whitetail. They just kill fast compared to some of the premium bullets I’ve used on deer.
The guide I use in NZ when hunting Tahr and Chamois tells me he does not like the Barnes (so read monometals) on these animals. To him they do not kill as quick as the standard cup and core bullets.
 
The guide I use in NZ when hunting Tahr and Chamois tells me he does not like the Barnes (so read monometals) on these animals. To him they do not kill as quick as the standard cup and core bullets.
I have used a .308 with 150gr Hdy flat base on a chamois and that was ridiculously excessive. Consensus seems to be that minimum suitable chambering for chamois is .22-250 with a hunting i.e., not varmint bullet. 7x57 with a good 140-150 grain deer bullet seems to be pretty good for tahr, even in winter.
 
I have used a .308 with 150gr Hdy flat base on a chamois and that was ridiculously excessive. Consensus seems to be that minimum suitable chambering for chamois is .22-250 with a hunting i.e., not varmint bullet. 7x57 with a good 140-150 grain deer bullet seems to be pretty good for tahr, even in winter.
I use a 270 with either a 130 Core Lokt or 140 grain interlocks. have not used the interlocks on Chamois but will next year and I think it might a bit excessive if under 200 mts. They are not a big animal. Maybe I should use the 6.8SPC
 
I use a 270 with either a 130 Core Lokt or 140 grain interlocks. have not used the interlocks on Chamois but will next year and I think it might a bit excessive if under 200 mts. They are not a big animal. Maybe I should use the 6.8SPC
Given how small they are … that sounds like a good plan.
 
I use a 270 with either a 130 Core Lokt or 140 grain interlocks. have not used the interlocks on Chamois but will next year and I think it might a bit excessive if under 200 mts. They are not a big animal. Maybe I should use the 6.8SPC
My 2 cents....shoot what you feel like when you're going on the hunt. I shoot better when I'm enjoying carrying a particular gun that feels right at that time.
 
My personal summary:
1) use an appropriate bullet to match the task
2) put the bullet in the right place
3) all bullets can/will fail at times
4) never stop learning!
@Ridgewalker
You forgot
3:1 ALL hunters can and will fail at times especially if they don't follow points 1 and 2.
Bob
 
Not sure if you are looking to hunt DG, but in general a sectional density (SD) above .300 is desired vs being below that. I'd have no problem hunting elk, black bear or even PG with a .375 caliber 270 grain bullet...but for DG, I'm going to stick with 300 grains as a minimum for the 375H&H.

Barnes TSX .375 caliber 270 grain has a .274 SD
Barnes TSX .375 caliber 300 grain has a .305 SD

The 300 grain bullet at 2550-2600 fps will get the job done quite well as evidenced by many others on this thread.

Want something even better for DG? How about a .375 caliber 350 grain TSX bullet that ups the sectional density to .356 and send them at 2250 to 2300 fps. At DG distances of less 50 yards or less, it's gonna be good.

I'll end by saying shot placement is the largest factor in quickly taking down anything from a chipmunk to an elephant. Whatever you decide to use, make sure you know where it's going BEFORE you pull the trigger.
@BeeMaa
310gn Woodleigh 35 cal sd .346 at 2,455fps. At dg distances of 100 yards or less it's gonna be good as well. I will end by saying shot placement is the largest factor.
HA HA HA HA HA HA
Bob
 
@BeeMaa
310gn Woodleigh 35 cal sd .346 at 2,455fps. At dg distances of 100 yards or less it's gonna be good as well. I will end by saying shot placement is the largest factor.
HA HA HA HA HA HA
Bob
I agree that the 35W loaded the way have it is capable of taking DG at less than 100 yards. And with your marksmanship skills, I'm sure shot placement wouldn't be a problem. The fly in the ointment is it's still illegal to do so in Africa for the Dangerous 7 animals.

Please feel free to launch a debate of why a 45-70 is legal but a 35W isn't in another thread and provoke the wrath of the lever action posse.

If you would like a small caveat for using less than 9.3/.375 caliber, it would be leopard. I know I've read hunt reports of people using 300WM specifically for this purpose. But I don't believe this extends to any of the other D7 animals. Best consult the regional game laws and discuss it with your PH before you get there and find out you are under-gunned.
 
I agree that the 35W loaded the way have it is capable of taking DG at less than 100 yards. And with your marksmanship skills, I'm sure shot placement wouldn't be a problem. The fly in the ointment is it's still illegal to do so in Africa for the Dangerous 7 animals.

Please feel free to launch a debate of why a 45-70 is legal but a 35W isn't in another thread and provoke the wrath of the lever action posse.

If you would like a small caveat for using less than 9.3/.375 caliber, it would be leopard. I know I've read hunt reports of people using 300WM specifically for this purpose. But I don't believe this extends to any of the other D7 animals. Best consult the regional game laws and discuss it with your PH before you get there and find out you are under-gunned.
@BeeMaa
In some countries the 35 would be legal for dg as loaded properly it would meet the enery requirements in others not.
When I hunted Namibia my PH said he would take me out for buffalo with the Whelen after seeing it perform. He said with the right bullets it would work a treat with the RIGHT SHOT PLACEMENT. In his opinion it worked better on pg than the 9.3x62 because of the lighter bullets at higher velocity and would be fully the equal of the 9.3x62 for DG loaded with similar bullets at the same velocity. In his opinion he would prefer a client to use a 9.3x62 that they can shoot well than a 40+ cal they have difficulty using but insist that's what they were told was needed.
Yes the BIGGER calibers work far better if you have the SKILL LEVEL to handle them. Unfortunately a lot of hunters don't.
My point being why does a man use a 300 magnum on big deer then buys his children a 25-06 for the same game and is then surprised when said child drops an animal with one shot.

They seem to forget they started out with smaller cartridges and killed everything but along the way lost focus and believed more in what others tell them ( gun writers)..

I'm not saying a bigger gun is not better but I think we need to get back to basics. In saying that my Whelen performed well on everything I shot in Namibia BUT my son's 308 killed animals just as dead, was lighter to carry, just as accurate and used the bullets matched to the game. Pus he had the marksmanship skills to place the bullet where it was supposed to be.
Bob
 
30-06
165 gr. Speer Boat Tail
Bullet not recovered
MV - 2700 + fps
Aoudad - 150ish yards (broadside)
Results - Devastating

Texas238.jpg
 
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Hornady .264 140gr Interlock. Est. impact velocity 2150 fps (300 yards from 6.5x55).

This is to contrast my previous post with the same bullet under much different circumstances. Broadside shot with a lower velocity impact between the ribs. No bone or dense muscle were hit to help with expansion. Deer ran about 100 yards. Based on wounding and exit the bullet still expanded adequately and destroyed both lungs. The wound channel through the lungs was much narrower, as you would expect in this case.

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.308 Win Barnes TTSX 130 grain @ 3100 fps MV

South Texas mature buck, 235# on the scales, facing head on, slight angle

Distance about 125 yards

Entrance on the forward point of the nearside shoulder, removed from the inside of the hide on the offside rear leg.

 

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