Tipping Guide

SPIKE, can you handle the “pressure” of shooting a charging buff or elephant? I bet you can (not sure if I can?) If so, you can certainly decline to leave a tip or Not feel forced to leave a prescribed amount. In the past 10 years the tipping options here in the US have gotten obnoxious and I gnome them and tip what I Feel is appropriate. Soon, Walmart will be asking fr a tip —- and they make you use “self checkout !!”

More the guilt trip they kind of lay on you....I leave tips in places where the service has been fine...and way more if the service was great...but when you have breakfast and you basically serving yourself...and only thing the waitress/waiter delivers apart from the bill is coffee...which I don't drink...I just don't like her or him looking at you expecting a tip for doing fkall....and as been said I couldn't believe either some of the places that had the tip option ....which I had no problem declining.....just find the whole thing ridiculous and out of control....
 
Good Point Dean, waiters and servers often don’t give great service to transients because they know they won’t see them again and some customers tip less for same reason. But i still don’t stiff them unless i get treatment that justifies it because I think some still try their best - they get caught up in the “cycle“ too, frustrated that some never tip them regardless of the level of service they provide — so they cop an attitude towards everyone. Hey, we can’t save the World tip x tip, we all just do what we are comfortable with in the moment. I tip more for good service or a very Good Looking Waitress - she could have a lousy attitude and provide rotten service but if she’s “Hot” she gets a great tip - Beauty MUST be rewarded!!

If they give shit service or have a crap attitude, then they shouldn't be working in the hospitality industry simple....
 
Of course you will because your cultural superiority knows no bounds. I won't respond to your. further provocations because there is just zero chance any other point of view is ever going to make a dent in your unassailable superiority to the rest of the world. PUTZ X 100.

And with your attitude you definitely shouldn't work in hospitality........ :E Shrug:
 
I think that after 65 pages we are just beating the dead horse.
Whatever had to be said, it was said.

Besides practical comments on tipping, and jokes on both sides, we also identified two different tipping cultures, American and European.

I wonder what would Forest Gump say in this situation, now?

:unsure:
 
 
I have commented on this same subject about a year ago on AH and I am not surprised that it has come up again. Tiping is just one of those issues that confounds hunters at nearly every camp I have ben too, sometimes to the point of creating anxiety for several days near the end of the hunt. Personally, I think that American hunters (I am an American by the way) are responsible for taking tiping out of the general realm of a gracious gesture and introduced it as an expectation of entitlement that can cause jubilation or sour a whole camp based on the tip left by the previous hunting party.

I have booked 2 Safari's this year with the hope of scoring on the classic Big 5 plus several plains game species this year. I was fortunate enough to have my PH visit and stay with me in the States for several days and we were able to address the tipping issue in detail well before the hunt.

I was given similar guidelines as Jerome original article when it can to the maids, cook, camp staff, skinners and trackers. Not percentages but actual dollar amounts. For example, about $5/day for the camp staff, $15/animal for each animal the skinner has to work with, $5-10/day for the head tracker and if there is a clear head tracker and a subordinate who also does the driving, about 1/2 of the amount to the subordinate tracker than is given to the head tracker.

My PH was not demanding but concerned about "over-tipping." His feeling was that those guys who are very generous create an expectation for the next group of hunters coming into camp. The group that comes in after a great tipper will get very good service in hopes of an equally large tip. If they do not get such a generous tip, the camp can sour and the next group can pay for the disappointed staff with less than stellar service. I think it is a very good idea to talk this over with the outfitter and PH before you even book the hunt. If there seems to be an expectation of a particular tip, or the suggested range seems high to you as the hunter, you intuition may be well worth following and you should look elsewhere.

I staunchly, but respectfully, disagree with the suggestion of a tip based on a percentage of the cost of the hunt. As I said, I will be on 2 safari's for dangerous game. the hunts, when you include daily rates and trophy fees will easily cost $100,000 or more. Based on the 10% of cost average, the tip would be at least $10,000. I cannot see any justification for that kind of a tip. The camp staff works no harder for a DG hunt than a PG hunt so that hardly forms a reasonable justification for the tip. Why should it matter to the cook or maid what animals I am hunting or how much I spend on trophy fees?

If the justification is the dangerous element of the hunt and the bulk of such a tip goes to the PH, I have to query what I am paying the PH for in the first place. Is the tip so that he or she will work harder to find the trophies I am there to hunt? That is just crazy - I am already paying over a $100,000 for the outfitter and PH to work and locate game on my hunt, why do I need to promise 10% more just to get what I paid for in the first instance.

Taking it to the next level, since it is dangerous game, is the tip meant to cover the danger involved. Should my PH be less willing to back me up or shoot to stop an elephant, Buffalo or Lion charge if he or she knows I do not plan to tip $10K? Again, that is a ridiculous proposition.

Hunting is very expensive. I realize that running a hunting camp is also an expensive proposition as I have been to a few places and have a pretty good idea of what it costs. I have come to believe that in too many cases, the outfitters have come to rely upon the hunter and tips the hunter leaves to substitute for the appropriate wages that the outfitter should pay the staff. I for one pay particular attention to that issue when evaluating trips as I think it can be a very good but subtle insight into he type of operation that the outfitter runs.

I am by no means cheap and I enjoy the reaction that tip derives for a camp staff member. But I loath the expectation of a certain percentage tip based on the cost of the hunt - I personally, and again with due respect to those of you who do tip based on the cost of the hunt, just do not see why the cost of the trophy fee should have anything to do with the service I get in camp, by the trackers, skinners and most certainly the PH.

As I said in the beginning, this is an important topic and it is one that I highly recommend everyone addressing with the outfitter/PH before the hunt. I know and agree that it is, or should I more appropriately say it should be, the personal discretion of the individual hunter but he reality of the modern safari camp is that it is not just between the hunter and the person receiving the tip. Too often it is the next hunter or group of hunters effected by what tip is given at the end of the hunt and the expectations should be very clear from the start. If the service then turns out to be better than expected or someone went over and above expectations, I usually make sure I have an appropriate personal gift to give in recognition of the extra personal effort.

Cash is what many of the staff need and that should be the basic tip. For exceptional service above what is contacted and paid for, I find a personal gesture much more rewarding to me, welcome by the recipient and it does not usually alter the mood of the camp.

A difficult topic and as usual, the forum members of AH have shared varying opinions with dignity and respect for each other and continue to make this one of the best and most informative hunting forums on the net.
I have been a guide and an Outfitter here in Alberta. I have also been a client on a Plains Game hunt in the Eastern Cape with an excellent PH and tracker. This hunt was 2x1, with myself and my girlfriend being the hunters. Tipping is very subjective, and can be a touchy subject. On hunts up to around the 5K mark or so, a 10% tip is not unheard of. I have been the recipient of just such a tip....I have also received nothing after working my butt off, lol. Once the hunt starts to get expensive (10K, plus), then I think the percentage should, (could ? ) be ratcheted back so as not to be too onerous for the hunter, and to avoid over-tipping, which I know some African Outfitters have a concern with. We hunted for 12 days, and the cost was in the neighbourhood of 15K. We tipped the PH about 1200 CDN, the tracker about 250 CDN, and about another 250 CDN spread amongst the camp staff. The PH portion was about 7-8%, which seemed to be fair taking into account what I have seen and experienced. I did talk to the Outfitter and he said that we were free to tip whatever we wanted. I also realize that hunting Dangerous Game adds another level of consideration to the tipping question. I would think that the PH would be the biggest part of your tip, in the area of $100/day, when large, nasty critters are involved? The rest of the staff would get tips with much reduced $$ amounts, and small gifts like knives, etc. I have great tips, like 1K US for a 10 day moose hunt, to not-so-great tips, like a half can of Mint flavoured Hot Chocolate....lol. True story. Anyway, these are just my thoughts on the subject, and they are not meant to insult or degrade anyone. Cheers.
 
As a guide /outfitter in Canada I have also seen extremes. I don’t think the outfitter needs a tip , even if also guiding. He owns the business and should be making money.
A guide could possibly be tipped. But not hugely. I know an outfitter that did not pay guides and expected them to get tips. He was very insistent that hunters tip well for good reason.
 
I have been a guide and an Outfitter here in Alberta. I have also been a client on a Plains Game hunt in the Eastern Cape with an excellent PH and tracker. This hunt was 2x1, with myself and my girlfriend being the hunters. Tipping is very subjective, and can be a touchy subject. On hunts up to around the 5K mark or so, a 10% tip is not unheard of. I have been the recipient of just such a tip....I have also received nothing after working my butt off, lol. Once the hunt starts to get expensive (10K, plus), then I think the percentage should, (could ? ) be ratcheted back so as not to be too onerous for the hunter, and to avoid over-tipping, which I know some African Outfitters have a concern with. We hunted for 12 days, and the cost was in the neighbourhood of 15K. We tipped the PH about 1200 CDN, the tracker about 250 CDN, and about another 250 CDN spread amongst the camp staff. The PH portion was about 7-8%, which seemed to be fair taking into account what I have seen and experienced. I did talk to the Outfitter and he said that we were free to tip whatever we wanted. I also realize that hunting Dangerous Game adds another level of consideration to the tipping question. I would think that the PH would be the biggest part of your tip, in the area of $100/day, when large, nasty critters are involved? The rest of the staff would get tips with much reduced $$ amounts, and small gifts like knives, etc. I have great tips, like 1K US for a 10 day moose hunt, to not-so-great tips, like a half can of Mint flavoured Hot Chocolate....lol. True story. Anyway, these are just my thoughts on the subject, and they are not meant to insult or degrade anyone. Cheers.
It seems the good ole USA has pushed tipping on nearly every point of sale device with a credit or debit card. Self checkout etc. They now want tipped for being in business.
Most start at 10% and increment up to 50%. The custom option might allow no tip or set your %.
 
As a guide /outfitter in Canada I have also seen extremes. I don’t think the outfitter needs a tip , even if also guiding. He owns the business and should be making money.
A guide could possibly be tipped. But not hugely. I know an outfitter that did not pay guides and expected them to get tips. He was very insistent that hunters tip well for good reason.
I don't see the "good" reason.
 
It seems the good ole USA has pushed tipping on nearly every point of sale device with a credit or debit card. Self checkout etc. They now want tipped for being in business.
Most start at 10% and increment up to 50%. The custom option might allow no tip or set your %.
Tips have existed for thousands of years. Don't blame the USA for inventing tipping. In general, Americans are generous, so are many other cultures. Not all however who can discuss "tips" endlessly and who are obssessed to fine tuning every cent to a ridiculous degree. The understanding of tipping and feeling comfortable tipping depends entirely on the environment one has been exposed to.
 
Tips have existed for thousands of years. Don't blame the USA for inventing tipping. In general, Americans are generous, so are many other cultures. Not all however who can discuss "tips" endlessly and who are obssessed to fine tuning every cent to a ridiculous degree. The understanding of tipping and feeling comfortable tipping depends entirely on the environment one has been exposed to.
@Paul Homsy
In Australia ripping is uncommon
Bob
 
@Paul Homsy
In Australia ripping is uncommon
Bob
Bob, having worked in the Service industry (Bartender in College and for 4 years afterwards) I’ve seen it from both sides. Our good customers were “sometimes” big tippers and other times just people we liked - they got the most “free drinks” and sometimes invited to stay after closing (as guests), when All drinks & food were Free. All customers got basic-good service but I can remember a few times Waitresses got “stiffed” after serving a Table of 5-6 people for hours and I (as Manager) approached those Customers and asked “was everything all right? Service/food/drinks ok?” Then when they responded “Yes, why?” I would explain “Well, you left No tip for the Waitress and she was devoted to your table for 3 hours and I just wanted to make sure there was no problem”… About 50% of the time they dug into pockets and handed out a tip —- other times they could care less and I would share my Bartending tips with the Waitress that night to cover it. I know many would say it’s Not their job to pay the waitress but those customers - if they ever returned - got S—t service. That behavior was very rare in our Bar in the 1980s and less then 5% of customers left No Tip to a waitress, maybe 25% left No tip to our Bartenders —- those people Never got a Free drink or strong drink. They also sometimes incurred “other” punishments that any former Bartender or Waitress will be familiar with.
 
Bob, having worked in the Service industry (Bartender in College and for 4 years afterwards) I’ve seen it from both sides. Our good customers were “sometimes” big tippers and other times just people we liked - they got the most “free drinks” and sometimes invited to stay after closing (as guests), when All drinks & food were Free. All customers got basic-good service but I can remember a few times Waitresses got “stiffed” after serving a Table of 5-6 people for hours and I (as Manager) approached those Customers and asked “was everything all right? Service/food/drinks ok?” Then when they responded “Yes, why?” I would explain “Well, you left No tip for the Waitress and she was devoted to your table for 3 hours and I just wanted to make sure there was no problem”… About 50% of the time they dug into pockets and handed out a tip —- other times they could care less and I would share my Bartending tips with the Waitress that night to cover it. I know many would say it’s Not their job to pay the waitress but those customers - if they ever returned - got S—t service. That behavior was very rare in our Bar in the 1980s and less then 5% of customers left No Tip to a waitress, maybe 25% left No tip to our Bartenders —- those people Never got a Free drink or strong drink. They also sometimes incurred “other” punishments that any former Bartender or Waitress will be familiar with.
@HankBuck
In Australia our staff get paid a decent wage and don't have to rely on tips to make up for wage short falls. My son for example works a bar where he gets over $30/ hour. On the weekend his wage goes up to over $40/ hr when he worked a public holiday it was over $60/ hr.
He does get some tips but not much.
If I go out for a meal and it was good and the service was good I will leave a tip. 99% of the time they get a tip. It has to be shit for me not to leave something.
Bob
 
@HankBuck
In Australia our staff get paid a decent wage and don't have to rely on tips to make up for wage short falls. My son for example works a bar where he gets over $30/ hour. On the weekend his wage goes up to over $40/ hr when he worked a public holiday it was over $60/ hr.
He does get some tips but not much.
If I go out for a meal and it was good and the service was good I will leave a tip. 99% of the time they get a tip. It has to be shit for me not to leave something.
Bob
OK BOB, I’d give YOU a Free drink or two at my Bar - likely for good conversation and interesting stories that could be told. But here in the U.S most waiters make minimum wage or below $7.00 an hour - tips are factored into their pay. In the 1980s minimum wage was $3.35 so I made a salary of $134 a week — but another $400 a week in tips. $500 a week was Big money in 1980, my friend was commuting into Manhattan daily for large Accounting Firm and making only $260. In Manhattan Waiters & Bartenders at Top Restaurants and Night Clubs make $150,000 - $200,000 a year - much of it cash….those jobs are highly sought after and very hard to get….unless you’re a woman with an Elk size rack !
I agree with you in principle - why does the Customer need to pay the waiter’s salary?…but that’s the practice here and food/drink prices would be much higher if that changes —- as is happening Now in California where McDonalds workers are making $20 an hour so a Hamburger went from $4.00 up tp $9.00 (same crap burger!).
 
OK BOB, I’d give YOU a Free drink or two at my Bar - likely for good conversation and interesting stories that could be told. But here in the U.S most waiters make minimum wage or below $7.00 an hour - tips are factored into their pay. In the 1980s minimum wage was $3.35 so I made a salary of $134 a week — but another $400 a week in tips. $500 a week was Big money in 1980, my friend was commuting into Manhattan daily for large Accounting Firm and making only $260. In Manhattan Waiters & Bartenders at Top Restaurants and Night Clubs make $150,000 - $200,000 a year - much of it cash….those jobs are highly sought after and very hard to get….unless you’re a woman with an Elk size rack !
I agree with you in principle - why does the Customer need to pay the waiter’s salary?…but that’s the practice here and food/drink prices would be much higher if that changes —- as is happening Now in California where McDonalds workers are making $20 an hour so a Hamburger went from $4.00 up tp $9.00 (same crap burger!).
@HankBuck
Wages in the USA are shit compared to Australia.
As a disability worker ten years ago I was in $40/ hr. Abother worker went to the USA with his wife and the same job at the same time was paying $14.50/hr.
That's why Australia is in trouble in my opinion as everyone wants big money. That equals big prices for housing and general living
Bob
 
My 2025 buffalo & PG hunt = $15,000 U.S , my buddy says bring $4000 in cash for camp staff , trackers, ph ect
sounds steep ? We are splitting a camp & ph
 
My 2025 buffalo & PG hunt = $15,000 U.S , my buddy says bring $4000 in cash for camp staff , trackers, ph ect
sounds steep ? We are splitting a camp & ph

How many days are you hunting and in what country?

HH
 

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