Tipping Guide

Red Leg

Lifetime bronze benefactor
AH ambassador
Joined
May 19, 2009
Messages
6,216
Reaction score
17,242
Location
Texas Hill Country
Media
271
Articles
5
Hunting reports
Africa
2
USA/Canada
4
Mex/S.Amer
1
Europe
3
Member of
SCI DSC life memberships / NRA Patron Life
Hunted
Mexico, Namibia, RSA, Germany, Austria, Argentina, Canada, Mozambique, Spain, US (15 states)
It is indeed the truth, but keep in mind a good restaurant worker in America can make a healthy living. $3 an hour, 40 hours a week is $120. They might make $1000 in tips on a Friday night in a high quality restaurant. There are bartenders in America making $80 a week in wages but they are making $3000 a week in tips.
Sorry sir, this is an "cracy story".
This must bring an modern sociaty in problems, in many problems.
Two - of many - the tax and the heath care. Nobody knows exatly the income, the workers will take many "directly in their own pockets"
Now I understand Obama mutch better....



Your story with the sable
(Costs normaly 6.000 and you payed 1,500 directly, plus..., if I understand you correctly).

This sounds for me more like an oriental-basar...
The PH can offer this, change the prices on his will?
What ist with the outfitter? Your agent in America? The tax? And the community?
This "kind of "buisness"" brings mutch more problems - specially for the next clients and the workers witch see this and want to do this (buisness directly and on their own) also -...
I will not support sutch methods...
It may be "cracy" but it is a cultural norm in this country. We had a dear young friend in Northern Virginia with a MBA. She tended bar at a great restaurant in the burbs of DC because she made twice as much there than she would in an entry level management position in one of the many corporations headquartered in the area. Plus, based upon my own experiences in the corporate world, I am certain that she had a lot more fun.

You may indeed have all the political wisdom and insight in the world, but I guarantee you that Obama tips very well when he and Michelle have dinner out whether in Chicago, Honolulu or Martha's Vineyard. You should as well should decide to eat more than once at the same restaurant in our country.

And by the way, we travel in Europe extensively. I always tip there as well - doing everything I can to undermine European culture one meal or hotel porter at a time. :cool:
As stated before, I look at total prices for safari, including extra costs. Either I can afford, or I cannot - then I pass.
I am also professional where in the line of work , I was to more then 60 countries in the world, 5 continents (different cultures and social norms) and I have never been tipped.


I see it exactly, Mark.

And:
You are often in Nam. This is not the typical american-safari-land (nothing against americans, I have many freinds there and was over 10 times there an buisness and holidays) and so they dont have that problem there.

The worker get payed an on high level (for african standarts).
Treat fair and they are mostely saticefied (I speak often with them).

And mostly the farmer ist the outfitter, the camp-chief and the Ph in one person.
This make it mutch easyer.
With respect to hunting, It has been my observation that there are actually two Namibias - one which caters to North Americans (with a heavy dose of US citizens) and one which caters primarily to Europeans. The former set of outfitters tend to be of Boer extraction and the others of German. Obviously, this is a broad generality and there is significant overlap, but the business models of those supporting primarily a US clientele are like all others in Africa where tips form an important part of the income stream.

I have told this story before, but as I was getting ready to head home from one hunt, I was chatting with a couple of the PH's and they mentioned a pair of Danes were due in about the time I left. I asked who would be guiding them. Both laughed and the youngest/newest raised his hand. "I get the Europeans."
 

BSO Dave

AH enthusiast
Joined
Nov 29, 2015
Messages
328
Reaction score
1,015
Location
Florida
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
QDMA, NWTF, NRA
Hunted
South Africa, North America, New Zealand, South America, Europe
Sorry sir, this is an "cracy story".
This must bring an modern sociaty in problems, in many problems.
Two - of many - the tax and the heath care. Nobody knows exatly the income, the workers will take many "directly in their own pockets"
Now I understand Obama mutch better....
LOL... :E Laugh:Spoken like a true socialist...
 

Blue Moon

AH senior member
Joined
Mar 23, 2018
Messages
82
Reaction score
66
That is true, Mark, but there is also “playing the game”. English speaking Africans, particularly Zimbabweans understand this American dance we do pretty well. This would not work with European clients.

I’ll give you an example. My PH knew full well that I’m American and I tip as an American hunter does. He also knows he’s working for tips for himself and his staff. He pointed out to me that there was an old, old sable in the area that they had seen on and off again for more than a decade. One horn broken many years ago and now polished smooth and near symmetrical again. About 5” of secondary growth. The animal was likely 14-17 years old and definitely by European hunting standards, a truly magnificent trophy animal. That sable should have had a $6000 trophy fee associated with it. He stated, even though it wasn’t on my quota, if we find that sable I should harvest it. I agreed. We did find that animal that was habituated to an area a couple days into the trip. I don‘t remember what I paid for that sable but it was nearly nothing. $1500? A European would NEVER have been offered this deal, but he knew that the price he asked was irrelevant because I was going to tip him a lot for a mature sable with 5” of secondary growth. There is a non-verbal contract that the more generous the PH is with me, the more generous I will be with him. He had me shooting birds even though I didn’t pay for gun rental or bird fees. He wanted me to take a shot at a jackal for free if we saw one. Nothing is free, It was just an understood, friendly quid pro quo that was going on throughout the trip.

A European wouldn’t have understood this non-verbal communication because it is peculiar to North America.

This trip, I’m bringing a lot of things over I know they’ll need as gifts, used iPads, trail cams, outdoor equipment, fishing lures, etc. I do It to be nice to them and because there is need, but I have no doubt that at the end of the trip there will be accounting irregularities as they forget to charge my son for shooting pigeons, or taking a duiker, or any host of other things that should tally up to a $1000 in small fees. It’s just how things are done. Sort of a battle of who can be more generous and gracious with one another as is often the case with Americans and Africans.
I'm sure that there are Europeans who understand this just as there are Americans who understand why you pay trophies by inch in Europe. Basically, tipping has disappeared in Europe because governments want to tax your last dime. If you deal with non-taxed cash in this way it is even likely that you will end up in problems with the Tax Agency. Since governments have enforced high taxes on people, they are less willing to give tips or pay anything above the list price. But, don't worry you will get there too. Maybe it will take a couple of elections, but no more than that.
 

Blue Moon

AH senior member
Joined
Mar 23, 2018
Messages
82
Reaction score
66
Hi VertigoBE,

That’s a good cultural distinction. Just for your awareness, in Africa, the operator’s entire profit margin might be the tip. The locals that are doing your laundry, skinning, tracking, cooking, and cleaning may make $2-8 USD per day for the days you are at camp. They may have 60 working days a year to collect that $2-$8 a day. Your tip is what literally feeds their family for months.

On a lighter note, in the USA we have a minimum wage for our service people That minimum wage varies from $7 to $15 per hour, however restaurant service people are exempt in most areas. The minimum wage for restaurant workers is $3 per hour. They are often required to come in before opening and work hours after closing cleaning the establishment, folding linens, setting tables, taking out trash, and other thankless tasks. Their reward for working for slave-labor wages in America is the PRIVILIGE to work when customers are present in the hopes of pocketing the tips. The wages made are nothing, the tips are everything.

In both instances, the quality of service you receive in Africa or America is spectacular compared to Europe because they are aiming to earn a substantial tip. This is also one reason Americans are perceived as rude when they visit Europe, we cannot understand why everyone in Europe is giving us bad food service. Of course the workers don’t understand that we are very demanding because we are expecting great service in exchange for a MINIMUM 15% tip to the waiter or waitress. It’s this mutual misunderstanding that causes much misgivings.
A tip does not usually stay with the waiter or waitress over here. If tips at all are given, they most likely end up in a common pot, which is then shared between all restaurant workers.
 

BSO Dave

AH enthusiast
Joined
Nov 29, 2015
Messages
328
Reaction score
1,015
Location
Florida
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
QDMA, NWTF, NRA
Hunted
South Africa, North America, New Zealand, South America, Europe
Basically, tipping has disappeared in Europe because governments want to tax your last dime. If you deal with non-taxed cash in this way it is even likely that you will end up in problems with the Tax Agency. Since governments have enforced high taxes on people, they are less willing to give tips or pay anything above the list price. But, don't worry you will get there too. Maybe it will take a couple of elections, but no more than that.

Not to get too far off track, but there seems to be a popular misconception by most non-Americans and possibly some Americans that tip income here in the USA is free, untaxable income. The reality is that nothing could be further from the truth.

In the USA, any tip amount above $20 a month is legally required to be reported as income. The vast majority of service industry businesses automatically deduct and report a minimum of 8% of an employee's gross sales each shift as tip income. Since over 90% of sales in the hospitality, food & beverage industries, and ride share services are now in the form of credit/debit card sales and no longer in cash, it is virtually impossible for a tipped employee to hide income. With the exception of the mom & pop corner tavern where the part-time bartender might have the opportunity to hide a few more dollars from cash sales compared to the bartender at a national chain restaurant, the vast majority of cab drivers, servers, bartenders etc., in the USA simply cannot avoid having their tip-based income amounts deducted and/or reported. Any that do will do so at their own peril, because their employer will be reporting their tip income to the IRS.

Regardless, if European countries prefer to have a different compensation model for their service workers that's fine... But, to suggest that the USA's model of tipping in service related industries is free cash that would significantly impact revenue collection for the government is simply false..
 

Red Leg

Lifetime bronze benefactor
AH ambassador
Joined
May 19, 2009
Messages
6,216
Reaction score
17,242
Location
Texas Hill Country
Media
271
Articles
5
Hunting reports
Africa
2
USA/Canada
4
Mex/S.Amer
1
Europe
3
Member of
SCI DSC life memberships / NRA Patron Life
Hunted
Mexico, Namibia, RSA, Germany, Austria, Argentina, Canada, Mozambique, Spain, US (15 states)
Not to get too far off track, but there seems to be a popular misconception by most non-Americans and possibly some Americans that tip income here in the USA is free, untaxable income. The reality is that nothing could be further from the truth.

In the USA, any tip amount above $20 a month is legally required to be reported as income. The vast majority of service industry businesses automatically deduct and report a minimum of 8% of an employee's gross sales each shift as tip income. Since over 90% of sales in the hospitality, food & beverage industries, and ride share services are now in the form of credit/debit card sales and no longer in cash, it is virtually impossible for a tipped employee to hide income. With the exception of the mom & pop corner tavern where the part-time bartender might have the opportunity to hide a few more dollars from cash sales compared to the bartender at a national chain restaurant, the vast majority of cab drivers, servers, bartenders etc., in the USA simply cannot avoid having their tip-based income amounts deducted and/or reported. Any that do will do so at their own peril, because their employer will be reporting their tip income to the IRS.

Regardless, if European countries prefer to have a different compensation model for their service workers that's fine... But, to suggest that the USA's model of tipping in service related industries is free cash that would significantly impact revenue collection for the government is simply false..
:S Agree: :A Way To Go:
 

Mort Hill

Gold supporter
AH elite
Joined
Jun 4, 2017
Messages
1,181
Reaction score
1,848
Location
Brentwood, TN
Media
81
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
Life Member SCI, Director-Music City SCI Chapter, NWTF, NRA
Hunted
SA, Zambia, Tanzania
I just returned from a first class fishing lodge in Costa Rica, Zancudo Lodge. This was my fifth year in a row to go. Covid has decimated the season. Normally 500-600 guest a season was cut to 100. They are closing down 3 months early. The staff are like family to me. This year, even with an incredible trip and fishing, I was moved to tip extraordinarily well. I feel for the livelihood of everyone from the cooks and waiters, to the boat washers and maids. My little contribution(I will make more money) will hopefully see these folks through to the next season. At some point, the tipping goes beyond service to a sense of ability and the support of those who need it more than I do. Just my two cents. As the good book says, I have been “blessed to be a blessing”.
 

Chago

AH enthusiast
Joined
Jan 19, 2018
Messages
413
Reaction score
796
Location
Canada
Media
102
Hunting reports
Africa
1
USA/Canada
3
Here is the part that makes me laugh. If there was a outfitter who decided to listen to the Euros and raise there prices in order to give staff a fair wage as they all cry and scream they want. And this same outfitter does not take tips nor allow them as the price is already set accordingly. This outfitter would go out of business because these same guys would all go to a different outfitter where it is cheaper because the expectation is the staff will be tipped. Then they will cry that tipping is stupid.

Option 2, Outfitters can make 2 pricelists. One for Euros and one for North Americans. Euro price being higher in order for the outfitter to pay the staff the higher rate.

Option 3, stop trying to impose your countries customs onto another. And just shut up and respect and partake in their culture since you are in their country. I personally find it weird they drive on the other side of the road in SA too. But I sure as hell didn't complain about it.
 

rookhawk

AH legend
Joined
Mar 4, 2015
Messages
3,359
Reaction score
4,702
Location
North America
Media
138
Articles
2
Member of
NRA Life Benefactor, Trout Unlimited, Safari Club International
So let’s talk about tipping on higher priced hunts.
Leopard hunt is 35k are you all thinking the PH should get 5K plus camp tips?
Lion/cape hunt is 80k should the PH get 12k plus camp tips?

I think that after a point the ratio comes down as many of these hunts are once in a lifetime hunts for the client who has been saving to accomplish them. It is not the clients responsibility to provide a livelihood for the business owner by tipping. If the Outfitter needs to make more to provide for a decent lifestyle for himself and staff then he should charge more.
If their defense is it would not be competitive with other outfitters than they should rethink how their business operates.
I run several businesses in the USA and in none of them can I expect to be tipped my profit margin...

It depends where. If it is a ranch cat and you’re staying at a lodge, no probably not. If its in Tanzania, there was lots of pre-baiting, it was a 21 day safari, and you’re at a fly camp? Probably not far off.

Rough math for a typical wilderness hunt in Zim/Moz/Zam would be PH gets $50 to $100 a day. So $1000 is about par on a DG 10-14 day hunt. The staff is getting $5-$10 a day, each. This is for good service if all goes according to plan.

The cheaper you are on tips, the more legitimate incidentals creep into a bill.

Some observations: I act like a bit of a celebrity with a rider requesting several things on safari. (No, not a giant brandy glass of green M&Ms) Examples include, please bring tons of Biltong, lots of piri-peri Spicy sauces, and I like brown liquor In moderation. None of these things are included in the price of a safari and they add to the operator’s costs by easily $100-$200 for a safari. I’ve never, ever been charged for these incidentals that the PH/Operator has every right to charge me for. I suspect a fair tip evens it out in the end. Last trip I needed a two day round trip pickup/drop off in a very far flung airport that usually incurs a $500-$800 charge, none was requested even though there was $300 in fuel charges. Same for the day burnt getting covid exit tests, no charge for all that fuel, or taking me shopping, or dropping me off to visit friends, etc.

I suspect if I was from a no-tip culture every one of these could have been applied to my bill.
 

rookhawk

AH legend
Joined
Mar 4, 2015
Messages
3,359
Reaction score
4,702
Location
North America
Media
138
Articles
2
Member of
NRA Life Benefactor, Trout Unlimited, Safari Club International
A tip does not usually stay with the waiter or waitress over here. If tips at all are given, they most likely end up in a common pot, which is then shared between all restaurant workers.

I cringe at this concept. When I go to Europe the service is often terrible. I often go back several times tipping heavily hoping for better service, seeking out the same staff. To think they have to share it means my friendly bribe to please not give me cold food and warm liquor was all in vain.

I’m not a fan of tip sharing or sharing in general. I like to reward exceptional service by who does it, ideally without that person having to share their reward with unexceptional co-workers.

I‘ll go back to my curmudgeon therapy group now.
 

Blue Moon

AH senior member
Joined
Mar 23, 2018
Messages
82
Reaction score
66
I cringe at this concept. When I go to Europe the service is often terrible. I often go back several times tipping heavily hoping for better service, seeking out the same staff. To think they have to share it means my friendly bribe to please not give me cold food and warm liquor was all in vain.

I’m not a fan of tip sharing or sharing in general. I like to reward exceptional service by who does it, ideally without that person having to share their reward with unexceptional co-workers.

I‘ll go back to my curmudgeon therapy group now.
Yes, it is a big diffrence in customer service. There is no monetary incentive för providing good customer service. Service charges are already included in the bill and therefore significant tipping basically only occur in very upscale and expensive fine dining restaurants. In other restaurants people pay what is says on the receipt or do a small round up. It should be noted that this is Northern Europe and that the further to the south you go in Europe, the more common it is with tipping.
 

Nyati

AH ambassador
Joined
Jan 15, 2011
Messages
7,880
Reaction score
3,319
Location
Madrid, Spain
Media
117
Hunting reports
Africa
6
Europe
1
Member of
RFEC, RFETO
Hunted
Spain, Finland, RSA ( KwaZulu Natal, Limpopo, North West, Northern Cape, Free State ).
I just returned from a first class fishing lodge in Costa Rica, Zancudo Lodge. This was my fifth year in a row to go. Covid has decimated the season. Normally 500-600 guest a season was cut to 100. They are closing down 3 months early. The staff are like family to me. This year, even with an incredible trip and fishing, I was moved to tip extraordinarily well. I feel for the livelihood of everyone from the cooks and waiters, to the boat washers and maids. My little contribution(I will make more money) will hopefully see these folks through to the next season. At some point, the tipping goes beyond service to a sense of ability and the support of those who need it more than I do. Just my two cents. As the good book says, I have been “blessed to be a blessing”.

That is a special circumstance, shows you are a good man :D Cheers:
 

Nyati

AH ambassador
Joined
Jan 15, 2011
Messages
7,880
Reaction score
3,319
Location
Madrid, Spain
Media
117
Hunting reports
Africa
6
Europe
1
Member of
RFEC, RFETO
Hunted
Spain, Finland, RSA ( KwaZulu Natal, Limpopo, North West, Northern Cape, Free State ).
Yes, it is a big diffrence in customer service. There is no monetary incentive för providing good customer service. Service charges are already included in the bill and therefore significant tipping basically only occur in very upscale and expensive fine dining restaurants. In other restaurants people pay what is says on the receipt or do a small round up. It should be noted that this is Northern Europe and that the further to the south you go in Europe, the more common it is with tipping.

It is more or less the same in Spain
 

rookhawk

AH legend
Joined
Mar 4, 2015
Messages
3,359
Reaction score
4,702
Location
North America
Media
138
Articles
2
Member of
NRA Life Benefactor, Trout Unlimited, Safari Club International
It is more or less the same in Spain

I know the topic is Africa tipping, but I do want to digress as the comments are interesting cultural differences. In America, service is a cherished, really big deal and it’s quite a treat to eat out. Food is so, so cheap in America compared to anywhere else I’ve been in the world, we all eat at home. (Example: top quality steak better than 99.9% of EU product is $15 a KG over here) So the middle class US family eats at home like kings most days of the week. When we do go out, it’s not really to eat better food, it’s to receive service and convenience, and it is expensive! Mid-tier fast food for a family of five at a restaurant costs the same amount as steak and crab at home for a family of five. (E.g. $15 a person)

This is relevant to the American mentality of A.) why we are so rude when we visit Europe because we don’t understand why prices are so high and our entitled expectation of service is so low. B.) this is why the American culture of tipping infected African safari tips.

On point B, I think Americans are so dazzled with the army of servants caring for our every whim in Africa we feel guilt, duty, obligation, embarrassment, or gratitude to tip very heavily as we are getting service that exceeds expectations at prices that are a fraction of what we pay back home. If I tip $5 in the US when someone brings me a burger warm, properly ordered, with all conceivable condiments, why wouldn’t I give that to an African? Especially since that $5 tip to a server in America buys them one Starbucks coffee whereas that $5 pays for a month of school fees for the child of the server in Africa?

Americans are uncomfortable with inequity and we do not believe anyone deserves their station in life. We want everyone to be rewarded for exceptional effort or results, viewing them as peers that may be the next successful business owner.

By the numbers, I believe data shows that Americans are the most charitable people on the planet. I don’t think that’s because we’re holier or more virtuous, only that our culture went from poor to rich in only two generations and our mentality is to reward, relieve suffering, and be “all in this together” working our way to better lifestyles.

To further divert but to explain this mentality with a personal anecdote, my wife’s great grandfather was an immigrant and did plaster work. He became one of the best laborers in New York for this work. He loved his life from poverty to upper middle class in only one lifetime, finishing his life having done the plaster work for the ultra rich of NYC and one of the finest country clubs in the world. His son, my wife’s grandfather got a college education because of that laborer’s wages, became president of Morgan Stanley, and was the chairman of that same country club his dad plastered. This upward mobility is reflected in how we tip, how we see potential in others, and how we feel everyone must be rewarded for excellence. We are generous, but we expect the same generous kindness and service reciprocated. It makes us gracious to others on safari but demanding to everyone because “why wouldn’t you want to be excellent, serve me well, and be rewarded?”.
 

Nyati

AH ambassador
Joined
Jan 15, 2011
Messages
7,880
Reaction score
3,319
Location
Madrid, Spain
Media
117
Hunting reports
Africa
6
Europe
1
Member of
RFEC, RFETO
Hunted
Spain, Finland, RSA ( KwaZulu Natal, Limpopo, North West, Northern Cape, Free State ).
Well written @rookhawk , but if I may :A Stirring: when you tip so "generously ", the recipient would tend to believe you are very wealthy, and will increase the cost of your hunt.
 

rookhawk

AH legend
Joined
Mar 4, 2015
Messages
3,359
Reaction score
4,702
Location
North America
Media
138
Articles
2
Member of
NRA Life Benefactor, Trout Unlimited, Safari Club International
Well written @rookhawk , but if I may :A Stirring: when you tip so "generously ", the recipient would tend to believe you are very wealthy, and will increase the cost of your hunt.

Not really. Most of the PHs have been to America and seen how we live. One PH commented my house was so small and he was shocked none of the neighbors fenced their yards. He found it peculiar. The African PH is pretty tuned in to who is wealthy and who is not long before the tips come. They also know what we know in America, generosity and tip size has no correlation to net worth.

For the record, I wish I could tip generously. I only tip “acceptably” within my means. If you think I’m being generous, you’re mistaken. I cannot afford to tip what they deserve, only to tip what I can afford.

The average American safari hunter is a small business owner, typically a ditch digger, carpenter, electrician, or manufacturer. Most did a lot of manual labor and through many 80 hour weeks for many decades, came to own a business that now allows them to hunt a bit. The Africans are aware of this. They visit our country and stay in our homes when they visit.

Europeans are the enigma for the Africans as they cannot figure out who has money or how they got it. Hereditary wealth is incredibly rare in America. Almost everyone going to Africa is spending their money and how they earned their money is patently obvious. (we usually wont’ shut up about construction projects, or paving, or home building, or injection molding, or some other trade)
 

Nyati

AH ambassador
Joined
Jan 15, 2011
Messages
7,880
Reaction score
3,319
Location
Madrid, Spain
Media
117
Hunting reports
Africa
6
Europe
1
Member of
RFEC, RFETO
Hunted
Spain, Finland, RSA ( KwaZulu Natal, Limpopo, North West, Northern Cape, Free State ).
@rookhawk , we´ll have to disagree on that, as based on my experience, I believe my arguments are valid.

But, I will leave it here, not trying to start an argument.
 

Red Leg

Lifetime bronze benefactor
AH ambassador
Joined
May 19, 2009
Messages
6,216
Reaction score
17,242
Location
Texas Hill Country
Media
271
Articles
5
Hunting reports
Africa
2
USA/Canada
4
Mex/S.Amer
1
Europe
3
Member of
SCI DSC life memberships / NRA Patron Life
Hunted
Mexico, Namibia, RSA, Germany, Austria, Argentina, Canada, Mozambique, Spain, US (15 states)
Not really. Most of the PHs have been to America and seen how we live. One PH commented my house was so small and he was shocked none of the neighbors fenced their yards. He found it peculiar. The African PH is pretty tuned in to who is wealthy and who is not long before the tips come. They also know what we know in America, generosity and tip size has no correlation to net worth.

For the record, I wish I could tip generously. I only tip “acceptably” within my means. If you think I’m being generous, you’re mistaken. I cannot afford to tip what they deserve, only to tip what I can afford.

The average American safari hunter is a small business owner, typically a ditch digger, carpenter, electrician, or manufacturer. Most did a lot of manual labor and through many 80 hour weeks for many decades, came to own a business that now allows them to hunt a bit. The Africans are aware of this. They visit our country and stay in our homes when they visit.

Europeans are the enigma for the Africans as they cannot figure out who has money or how they got it. Hereditary wealth is incredibly rare in America. Almost everyone going to Africa is spending their money and how they earned their money is patently obvious. (we usually wont’ shut up about construction projects, or paving, or home building, or injection molding, or some other trade)
@rookhawk , we´ll have to disagree on that, as based on my experience, I believe my arguments are valid.

But, I will leave it here, not trying to start an argument.

I think Rook is quite accurate. Of course to the average African, we are all rich beyond belief. But I am confident that most service sector business owners, regardless of the specific field, have a good sense of their clients' actual worth somewhere within 30 secs to a minute after meeting them. It is an inevitable skill of the profession. African outfitters probably have that more refined than most international businessmen due to their familiarity with North America. And what may or may not be provided in the form of a tip at the end of a hunt, obviously would have no bearing on those assumptions with respect to pricing in any case.

I think it is also true that the fast majority of Americans hunting Africa are indeed "self-made" individuals. Whether frugally successful as a teacher or public servant, or successful in business, most American hunters "earned" the privilege and resources to spend them in Africa. I suspect our trust fund or inheritors of the corporate mantel scions (and no criticism intended) make up a minute percentage of this forum. This is a huge generality (I have known some miserly bastards who pulled themselves up by their bootstraps), but I think that background of hard work does does create a sense of generosity among that clientele whether in a restaurant or a hunting camp.

I should also note that generosity is and should be proportional to what one can afford. But I think most of us who hunt with a professional guide do not begrudge offering monetary recognition for a job well done.

And as I noted above, I make a special point of doing it in Europe. :A Too Cool:
 

VertigoBE

AH veteran
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
118
Reaction score
179
Location
Brussels
Media
4
Hunting reports
Europe
2
Hunted
Belgium, Scotland, Slovenia
Not to find excuses not to tip, but could the US/EU cultural difference also come from the fact that 'tipping' is somewhat institutionalized in the EU. Through our immensely high level of taxation and social security payments, compared to most other countries, people believe there is no more reason to tip on top?

In Belgium I'm taxed (tax+social security) around 50% on my fixed salary and 60% on my yearly bonus. That's before I buy something of value, where I still need to pay the VAT of 21% (like a sales tax in the US) or specific taxes pertaining to a vehicle or real estate.

You could say that overall, something north of 2/3rds of what I earn is redistributed over the rest of the population. To have to give a tip in such a context almost feels like insult after injury.

Anyway, I'll be bringing a lot of cash to my first safari, if that is what is expected. But although I'm not scraping for money, I'm not wealthy enough yet that 10-15% extra cost is not going to be felt either.
 

mark-hunter

AH elite
Joined
Aug 14, 2016
Messages
1,762
Reaction score
2,163
Media
23
Articles
2
Hunted
Namibia - Kalahari, Namibia - Khomas highland
@VertigoBE
You can also carefully read comments by @Bullhunter and @Red Leg :
What can be concluded from there, the trick is to sign the contract with outfitter who "specialises" safari with European clients.
Moreover, you could focus your preliminary research to sign the contract with outfitter having most of Austrian and German clients, possibly Swiss.
Tips, will be reasonable. ;)
 

Forum statistics

Threads
36,632
Messages
693,989
Members
64,133
Latest member
DorothyGat
 

 

 

Latest profile posts

Rifle57 wrote on Rimshot's profile.
I bought some bullets from Rimshot and he is good to trade with!
Greetings all! I've been a hunter for 50 years, but only now planning a trip to Africa. I was fortunate and successfully bid on a couple hunts for plains game in SA later this year and next. Also a rare Native Texas (5th generation) and USMC Vet. Hunt safe y'all!
uujm wrote on trg's profile.
I am looking for a Safari Express. Was yours made in New Haven or South Carolina? Any other details you can give me? I am very motivated to buy.
pimes wrote on flatwater bill's profile.
Hello Bill - can you tell me that landowner/ranch/outfitter - Thank you!
Pete0905 wrote on damundsen87's profile.
Hello
Is the Khales 1-6 still for sale?
Thanks
Josh
 
Top