Canvas Is King

BeeMaa

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If my wife plans a "camping trip" it will most likely include amenities like room service.
That said, she would never complain about tent camping for the sake of hunting or fishing.
I just go with the flow because I can sleep just about anywhere.

She actually talked to our PH about a "bush camp" Buff hunt in Zim 2023.
That could be the hunt where she takes a Buffalo. (y)
 

Ridgewalker

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South Africa: Limpopo, Northwest; USA: Ak, Mt, Wy, Co, Ne, Ks, Nv, NM, Tx
In 1948 my parents took me to Rocky Mountain National Park where we camped in a canvas Baker tent. I was 1 year old. We used the Baker tent every vacation until 1955 when they bought a 14’ Mobile Scout trailer. We traveled Canada to Mexico in it until I went off to college in 1965. I went on a couple of 2-3 night backpack trips during my high school years using a homemade Trapper Nelson pack. After that I backpacked on some 75-80 trips 3-21 nights in the Texas/New Mexico deserts to the high altitudes of Colorado and Wyoming Carrying first a Kelly external frame pack, then a Lowe internal frame pack. I’ve solo backpacked in constant rains. Ran out of water and did without for two days In the Guadalupes. Waked up to 6” of fresh snow covering my bivi in the Pecks Wilderness of northern New Mexico. Spent the night in extreme winds at 14,000+ feet. Walked solo 56 miles in two days through the San Juan mountains of Colorado.
RVs, I owned at least 2 dozen pickup campers, travel trailers, fifth wheel trailers and now a small Sprinter motor home. None are “just right” for everything!

What ever you’re in/on it’s just great to be close to nature! I have been fortunate to have had a grand life in the outdoors!
 

roverandbrew

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You drive a defender in the US? That must be a pain regarding parts? Awesome 110- I drive a 90 here in SA.
Actually it’s quite affordable and quick through online suppliers. I maintain a few consumables in the garage and order others as needed.
 

roverandbrew

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Are Defenders as... I'm not sure what word to use. Not "unreliable" but...

See, I've wanted a 110 for a long, long time here in the USA (for their historic military application, mostly) but pretty much everyone I've talked to says they're not good vehicles and tend to leak profusely, for example. So I kinda put the idea of getting one out of my mind in favor of, if I could find one, an older model Mercedes G-Wagen or something similar like an American humvee. Plus if I can't find a used one here in the US, the only way I know of to get one is to have it custom-built and imported from England and that costs an exceedingly large amount of money for me.
I have driven either Series or Defenders the last 15 years as a daily driver. My wife also drives a defender. I find them very reliable if maintained. I just drove from Colorado to Virginia Beach with no issue and will drive back to Colorado after I pop down to Florida in the 110. I see a Land Rover as a lifestyle and enjoy the community.
 

roverandbrew

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Aha, well, I have asked, and last I checked, it was around $100K US for a Defender 110, even with some of the most basic stuff installed. Whereas I'm pretty sure I can get a refurbished Humvee for $10-15K at most, for example. But there is a specialty dealer, it seems, East Coast Rover Co. that could help me out, perhaps. But I do hear about the "maintenance challenge" stories, which is another reason why I'm not so sure about one.

But it would still be nice to have a classic British Army Green 110 among all the modern SUVs; you'd never have to worry about getting your car confused for another.
There is a huge difference in price between North American And Rest of the World spec Defenders. Mine are rest of the world.
 

roverandbrew

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Unless I am hunting - I find it hard to express how much I hate simply "camping." Probably way too many years experiencing the great outdoors with C- Rations or MRE's.
Thats how I feel about jumping, diving, pistols, and AR platforms.
 

Ridge Runner

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In 1948 my parents took me to Rocky Mountain National Park where we camped in a canvas Baker tent. I was 1 year old. We used the Baker tent every vacation until 1955 when they bought a 14’ Mobile Scout trailer. We traveled Canada to Mexico in it until I went off to college in 1965. I went on a couple of 2-3 night backpack trips during my high school years using a homemade Trapper Nelson pack. After that I backpacked on some 75-80 trips 3-21 nights in the Texas/New Mexico deserts to the high altitudes of Colorado and Wyoming Carrying first a Kelly external frame pack, then a Lowe internal frame pack. I’ve solo backpacked in constant rains. Ran out of water and did without for two days In the Guadalupes. Waked up to 6” of fresh snow covering my bivi in the Pecks Wilderness of northern New Mexico. Spent the night in extreme winds at 14,000+ feet. Walked solo 56 miles in two days through the San Juan mountains of Colorado.
RVs, I owned at least 2 dozen pickup campers, travel trailers, fifth wheel trailers and now a small Sprinter motor home. None are “just right” for everything!

What ever you’re in/on it’s just great to be close to nature! I have been fortunate to have had a grand life in the outdoors!
Yes. A backpack and traveling on foot into the wilderness can't compete with creature comfort of city folk campers.

Your thread reminds me of the solo foray I took in 1980. In short it was a trip across the Appalachian Trail from North Carolina to Tennessee. I gave up C-rat's for civilian food. Started out from Boone, NC heading to Morristown, TN to my folks home after leaving the Army the first time.

The day I departed Boone I weighed my pack on the local bus depot scales, it weighs 80 pounds. It was a military issue large exterior frame ruck sack.

The day started out sunny, warm, and clear. By night fall the temps had dropped and it was snowing. When I made camp the snow was knee to waist deep. Having not found any of the cabins by nightfall, I made camp using a boulder to reflect the heat of the trench campfire into my lean-to.

The next day I was in Tennessee, followed a trail that crossed an old logging road, I chose to follow the logging road out of curiosity; it lead to a highway (guess I should have went right instead of left).

I had a choice to make: either continue my hike or accept the offer of a ride by a gentleman to Knoxville: I chose the ride, since I chose to follow the logging road ending up at a paved road, instead of ending further up along the trail.

Regrettably, I lost a couple rolls of film. However, I was able to get the other 110 film developed that showed my frozen Jean's from my knees down thawing over the trench fire, my feet being warmed against the boulder, and a selfie of me positioned comfortably in my lean-to. Sadly all the photos of this once in a lifetime trip have disappeared over the years, along with the beach camping/hang gliding trip and other personal pictures with members of my army unit.
 
 

 

 

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