Wire and Water Documentary

Hank2211

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A video has been posted on YouTube - "Wire and Water" by Blood Origins:


The video describes the efforts by Guav and Courtney Johnson to rehabilitate an area of southwest Zimbabwe called (now) Wilberforce Ranch.

This video was of particular interest to me since I'll be hunting leopard on this property in 2025. I don't really need another leopard, but I'm always up for an interesting hunt, and to be one of the first hunters in a new area is always special. I've hunted with Guav a few times, and it's never been boring - poachers, special forces chasing terrorists, poisoned arrows, lost luggage, hunting in crocs for two weeks, etc., so I decided he wouldn't be the PH on this one! I will post a complete (as usual!) report once I'm done.

Conservation in action. Great to see.
 
It is a great watch. I had been looking forward to seeing it after hearing them talk about the film over the last year. Worth the wait.
 
Have always wanted to hunt with Guav-my only exposure to him is a couple Craig Boddington chapters and a hunting video here and there but seems like my kind of professional. Look forward to your long and highly detailed 2025 report with who ever you do hunt with, thank you for the heads up.
I think you always need another leopard!
 
I really enjoyed the video. Hopefully it becomes a success in the long term. It’s neat to see how game gravitates to areas where they are protected even in areas thought almost devoid of game.
 
I really enjoyed the video. Hopefully it becomes a success in the long term. It’s neat to see how game gravitates to areas where they are protected even in areas thought almost devoid of game.
Even if its fenced ????

Really enjoyed the video and shows what we as hunters do to conserve if people had a choice to donate to WWF or a project like this and actualy see where the money is going we as hunters would make a big difference.

But the greenies always take the real facts away and play the killing/bloodsport part?
 
Even if its fenced ????

Really enjoyed the video and shows what we as hunters do to conserve if people had a choice to donate to WWF or a project like this and actualy see where the money is going we as hunters would make a big difference.

But the greenies always take the real facts away and play the killing/bloodsport part?
If you are trying to draw me into an argument about fencing, I don’t think this is the appropriate thread. I do however see a significant difference between this model and the Limpopo model. As far as fencing preventing game from coming into area, it appears this area is still a work in progress with fencing.
 
If you are trying to draw me into an argument about fencing, I don’t think this is the appropriate thread. I do however see a significant difference between this model and the Limpopo model. As far as fencing preventing game from coming into area, it appears this area is still a work in progress with fencing.
375Fox, I agree with you - not the place to argue about fencing.

I would add this, though. As Guav points out, most of the fencing is low fence, or cattle fence. The animals can escape if they want to. The fact that they may choose not to unless threatened strikes me as neither here nor there.

I would also point out that the fencing allows the area to be patrolled and therefore controlled in terms of access, which is essential to keep the poachers out in the early days.

Lastly, when I am hunting leopard there, I don’t think the fences will matter at all. At least not to me or the leopard, should I be lucky enough to get one.
 
That was beautifully produced and a joy to watch such a good cause in the works.
 
Great video Hank. Thanks for posting it.

The Johnson's are to be commended for their effort with the community on this tract of land.

You are to be commended for stepping out and hunting on a new/unproven property. My hats off to you.
 
Thanks for posting Hank! Me and my wife watched it this evening. How would someone get in touch with them if they wanted to hunt on the property?
 
375Fox, I agree with you - not the place to argue about fencing.

I would add this, though. As Guav points out, most of the fencing is low fence, or cattle fence. The animals can escape if they want to. The fact that they may choose not to unless threatened strikes me as neither here nor there.

I would also point out that the fencing allows the area to be patrolled and therefore controlled in terms of access, which is essential to keep the poachers out in the early days.

Lastly, when I am hunting leopard there, I don’t think the fences will matter at all. At least not to me or the leopard, should I be lucky enough to get one.

Sorry Hank for disturbing the post and I am sure you will have a wonderful hunt with Guav, there. I am proud of my country and what we did to wildlife but there are some who shoot off fences and the way we do things at every instance.

Now suddenly when a whole new area will be game fenced electrified (44km of game fence gives you an area fenced off if taking a square of +- 11 000 Hectares or 27 000 acres) in a neighbouring country, where only some gates and fence will be left low for elephants mostly so they can move it is good to go. (If animals need to move or want to get away, fences don't keep them in they find a way)

I am in full support of what Guav is doing and I know with hunters backing it will become a success story. Lets hope this is an catalyst for more areas to be controlled.
 
***** Watched it on the big screen once I saw your post. 'Have seen Guav hunting Cameroon, et. al. in W. Africa and knew he was from Zim, but through this video we learn of his connection (and dedication) to that land and all its inhabitants, be they 4-legged or 2. He is very lucky (after nearly bankrupting himself-paying back taxes, all the improvement expenses,) that a wealthy sponsor was interested in getting involved. What comes around goes around-in a Very Good Way! I should like to see what happens in 3 more years...Good Stuff!
 

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