Please Recommend A 220 Grain .30-06 Springfield Factory Load

mark-hunter

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Professor Mawla

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Dear @Professor Mawla
You may consider Sako Hammehead 20-06, 220 grain:
Dear @mark-hunter
Thank you very much . So far , I have managed to find a good number of 220 grain contenders for the .30-06 Springfield :
- Sako Hammerhead
- Hornady Custom International
- PMP
- Federal Power Shok ( although whether or not this one is actually in production , is rather difficult to say )

I believe that I shall stick to the Sako Hammerhead 220 grain soft nosed factory load , for my upcoming Himalayan ibex hunt .
 

Cervus elaphus

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Good evening .
As many of you gentlemen know , I hunt Himalayan ibex once every alternate year .
View attachment 371106
In 2021 , I shall be going off again . Like I sometimes do ( when hunting in foreign countries ) , I shall be using the outfitter’s rifle - A .30-06 Springfield ( a sporterized Springfield Model 1903 ) this time around . The last Himalayan ibex which I had shot with a .30-06 Springfield ( pictured ) , was hunted by using 220 grain Remington Core Lokt soft nosed factory loads . However , my outfitters are currently unable to source any 220 grain Remington Core Lokt ammunition for my use in the .30-06 Springfield . I suspect that Remington going bankrupt has a hand in this . My outfitters can source .30-06 Springfield ammunition from most other brands for me , however .

I would be most grateful if anyone here would be so kind as to recommend a 220 grain soft nosed factory load for the .30-06 Springfield , which is currently being manufactured . But the bullet should be one of acceptable quality ( good expansion and at least 75 % weight retention) , because Himalayan ibex are very big animals .

With very best wishes ,
Anayeth
The Norma Bondstrike Extreme 180gr for 30-06 is also worth looking at. An accurate distance boatail spitzer mv 2756 and only drops 2.53" at 300 yds.
 

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Professor, if you are determined to use a 220 grain .30-06 bullet in factory loaded form, the best I have seen for sale in Canada is the Sako Hammerhead. It may be available to you since Sako has quite good worldwide distribution. It is a semi- pointed design, and the bullet is bonded. Both characteristics are superior to the Hornady International 220 RN or the older Remington or Federal loads.
 

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Mark-hunter, I think you are correct, but I have seen it listed both ways, so I was confused. I found two stores that advertise "Hammerhead" bonded. Pretty sure the Sako website has the correct description.
 

bruce moulds

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this thread has gone out of control.
when you look at the size of an ibex and assuming they are in open terrain, a cup and core 165 to maybe 180 gn spitzer by hornady, speer , or sierra, would be a vastly superior bullet, both in trajectory and terminally than 220 gn controlled expansion.
these things are not eland sized.
really heavy controlled expansion bullets are just too much bullet, and as such will have to be placed very well to be effective.
having to place a bullet that well asks the question of then why not just use a 243.
an interesting aside is a comparison of 200 gn and 220 gn 30 cal bullets from the cup an core era.
in those days it was the case that 220 gn bullets were meant for the 30 krag, and as such were much softer than 200 gn bullets for the 30/06.
bruce.
 

Cervus elaphus

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this thread has gone out of control.
when you look at the size of an ibex and assuming they are in open terrain, a cup and core 165 to maybe 180 gn spitzer by hornady, speer , or sierra, would be a vastly superior bullet, both in trajectory and terminally than 220 gn controlled expansion.
these things are not eland sized.
really heavy controlled expansion bullets are just too much bullet, and as such will have to be placed very well to be effective.
having to place a bullet that well asks the question of then why not just use a 243.
an interesting aside is a comparison of 200 gn and 220 gn 30 cal bullets from the cup an core era.
in those days it was the case that 220 gn bullets were meant for the 30 krag, and as such were much softer than 200 gn bullets for the 30/06.
bruce.
Hi Bruce, I used 220gr soft nose in my 30-06 in the 60's, I think they were Norma factory loads but couldn't be sure. Only ever bought them once - specifically for Elk (Wapiti) if I got the chance. They were too much bullet for red deer but I used them up during the roar for the big stags which were far heavier than an average male Ibex at 200kg. 200gr or 220gr on an Ibex would be like using a bus to run over a mouse. For long distance a good 165-180gr spitzer would do the job. In NZ Himalayan Tahr hunters have used the 7mm mag for those long shots in the mountains and a male Tahr weighs in at about 70kg.
 
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bruce moulds

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yes cervus, sometimes using too much bullet is less effective than using not enough..
the bullets need more resistance than they get to work effectively, and thus are poor killers.
when this ties in with poor trajectory as well, it is a lose- lose situation.
bruce.
 

Cervus elaphus

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yes cervus, sometimes using too much bullet is less effective than using not enough..
the bullets need more resistance than they get to work effectively, and thus are poor killers.
when this ties in with poor trajectory as well, it is a lose- lose situation.
bruce.
Correct, in fact they become like solids, and perhaps using a solid on a light animal might be a better choice. Someone here will know. In a .404J (my flavour of the month!) because of the velocity of the 257gr & 300gr cutting edge hollow points, these bullets are reversible into solids because of their flat base - reversible with a polymer tip - a 3-way option!
 

Professor Mawla

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@Cervus elaphus , @Longwalker , @bruce moulds , @mark-hunter

Gentlemen , thank you for all of your ( highly experienced and insightful ) advice . I would just like to let all of you know that the hunt is over (with incredibly positive results ) . In the end , I opted to go with @spike.t and @mark-hunter and @Longwalker ’s advice . I had my outfitter source some 220 grain Sako Hammerhead soft nosed factory loads for my rented .30-06 Springfield . And they worked magnificently on the Himalayan ibex ( and Urial too , but that is the subject for another topic ) .

I find @Longwalker ’s assessment to be pinpoint accurate . The 220 grain Sako Hammerhead is ballistically lightyears ahead of the old pattern 220 grain Remington Core Lokt , which I have been employing for so many years . For more details ( and photographs ) about the hunt , please keep your eyes on the “ articles “ section for any upcoming articles from me .
 

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@Longwalker
I think sako hammerhead is standard soft point.
Sako Superhammerhead is bonded.

Mark-hunter, I think you are correct, but I have seen it listed both ways, so I was confused. I found two stores that advertise "Hammerhead" bonded. Pretty sure the Sako website has the correct description.
IIRC, I've read that the Sako HH is bonded, but the Sako SHH is even more so. :)

It could be that the HH has a "mechanical" bond like Hornady Interlock, i.e. some internal crimping that keeps the cup and core together. The SHH should be 'fully bonded' like other more modern bullets like Norma Oryx, Federal Fusion etc.

At any rate, I believe that the HH is not meant for speed, and as long as impact velocity is kept 'normal', it should perform well. So, while it is possible to load them in a .30-378, it is probably best not to.

@Professor Mawla : Good to hear that all went well, and looking forward to read more details about the hunt.
 

mark-hunter

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I tried to use superhammerhead for two consecutive seasons.

30-06, SHH, 150 grain.
On thin skinned game, roe deer, it passes through like FMJ.
Sometimes the game does not even show the sign of being hit.

My reasoning at the time (trying to be smart) was:

Almost 900 m/sec MV (declared 2953 fps) , will certainly initiate expansion, and in the same time, with light bullet I will stretch the trajectory for longer shots. Lighter mass, will be compensated with bonding, it will not loose weight or disintegrate. Oh, how wrong I was.

Accurate it was - sub moa. (in fact most accurate bullet in my sako 85, ever)
Trajectory, very flat indeed.

But roe deer kept walking away, after being hit in vital zone, each time I had to follow blood spoor. 200 meters from the position where they were hit, 150 meters blood spoor, or not showing the sign of hit, getting shot for second time.... (that was once)

SO, I went back to nosler ballistic tip, for roe deer, and never looked back. (with usual DTR effect on roe)
So, that was my affair with bonded bullets for thin skinned game. Thanks, but no thanks.

Different story, for red deer, and boar... I use different approach in choice of ammo.
 

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