NEWFOUNDLAND: Canadian Moose Hunt With Red Indian Lake Outfitters

JES Adventures

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My quest for the final specie to complete the North American 29 starts with a hunt to Newfoundland for Canadian Moose. The weather has been warm according to the outfitter so the rut has been spotty so we are hoping for better weather. My past experiences have taught me the colder, the better for Moose. I chose Newfoundland for the high density of Moose and after my successful hunt for Woodland Caribou with Red Indian Lake Outfitters a couple of years back, it was a no brainer to use them for this hunt.

Day 1

We started off early this morning, my son Grant joining me on the hunt for moose. This is his first trip to the Great North, and we are really looking forward to getting out in the woods together. The alarm jolted me awake at 4:30 and I made coffee and hopped in the shower. It has been a tough week, allergies and a mild case of bronchitis has had me down, but the trip has been booked for nearly a year and I was determined to go.

It took us about three hours to get to DFW Airport and checked in with Air Canada. The first leg takes us to Toronto, then after a lengthy layover we fly to Deer Lake and overnight before heading to camp.

Check in went fairly quick so we had a bit of time before boarding the plane. The flight was smooth, and we talked most of the way passing time. It is a relatively short flight to Toronto (less than 3 hrs) and after we landed and cleared customs, we went on to baggage claim to retrieve the rifles. After a half hour, nothing appeared at oversize, so I went to the Air Canada baggage help desk. The attendant informed me there is another oversized baggage belt at the end of the hall. Low and behold, the rifle was there so off to Customs. The RCMP Officer was very friendly and efficient with the paperwork. It was my son’s first time travelling with a rifle, so he got a good lesson and positive experience. After exiting, we took the gun box to the bag drop then went on to spend the next few hours in the airport lounge.

We boarded our flight to Deer Lake, and it ended up being delayed by about 20 minutes. The flight was another two and a half hours, so I caught a nap and woke before landing. The flight had a lot of hunters on it, including one gentleman that I had met in Texas previously, so we chatted while waiting on luggage. I was happy to see my duffle pretty quick then my rifle case followed. As more people retrieved their luggage the carousel finally stopped, and Grants bag was missing. So, he has no clothes but more importantly all our ammo is in his bag. The Air Canada Rep said there is a flight at 2PM and again at midnight so we can only be hopeful the bag comes in on the two o’clock flight as are set to go to camp today.

The shuttle took us and the last few hunters that also arrived without some or all of their luggage to the Holiday Inn and we were checked in and to our room by 2AM.

Day 2

I woke to the sound of a text at 6:50 from Fred Thorne the outfitter asking me what the status was. I went online to check the baggage tracer and it did not work. I called Air Canada, and the representative knows nothing except the last time the bag was scanned was in Toronto. She said it will take 24-48 hours for an update, totally unacceptable since we only have six days to hunt. Fred delayed our chopper flight to camp until late afternoon. Fred has a couple of loaner guns, and we took a half hour cab ride to Corner Brook to the Canadian Tire and bought boots and clothes for Grant. Back to the hotel then turned around and headed for the airport to see if the bag had arrived.

The attendant checked the computer and said the bag was there, but after more than 45 minutes of waiting she finally took Grant to look in the back at all of the unclaimed baggage and it was nowhere in sight. Not real sure what’s going on with Air Canada, but they don’t have a very efficient system for tracking lost bags. Two of the other hunters who didn’t get bags last night both got theirs, but ours are missing.

I took a cab back to the hotel, gathered up all the gear and we went to the helicopter charter hangar and waited a few hours to get ferried to the camp. It was a short twenty-minute flight to camp, and we settled in the freshly built cabin build on the shores of Caines Lake.
NF JE and G.jpg

Grant and I will share a room and the other hunter in the second room. A modern cabin with all amenities, not large but very nice. Michael the other guide was starting dinner while we sorted our gear out and Morgan grilled the steaks. After dinner, we made plans for the morning hunt, we will have breakfast at 6 and head out. It’s great to be right in the heart of the hunting area as we don’t have to travel very far to be in prime moose country.
NF cabin.jpg
 
Sorry to hear about y’all’s luggage issues. Sounds like y’all are making the best of the situation. Good luck on getting your moose.
 
Not real sure what’s going on with Air Canada, but they don’t have a very efficient system for tracking lost bags.

They have one of the worse, if not the worse bag tracking system. On my trip back from Canada, I had two United flights and they could tell me exactly where my bag was. It is crazy.
 
Sorry for your sons lost bags, hopefully it all worked out. My first hunting trip our west no clothes or ammo arrived just my rifle, other guys in camp helped out with hunting clothes, day 3 airport delivered my lost bag. I used the apple I-tag tracker for the first time on my trip to SA this past month they worked great. At least you know the approximate location of your item.
 
My quest for the final specie to complete the North American 29 starts with a hunt to Newfoundland for Canadian Moose. The weather has been warm according to the outfitter so the rut has been spotty so we are hoping for better weather. My past experiences have taught me the colder, the better for Moose. I chose Newfoundland for the high density of Moose and after my successful hunt for Woodland Caribou with Red Indian Lake Outfitters a couple of years back, it was a no brainer to use them for this hunt.

Day 1

We started off early this morning, my son Grant joining me on the hunt for moose. This is his first trip to the Great North, and we are really looking forward to getting out in the woods together. The alarm jolted me awake at 4:30 and I made coffee and hopped in the shower. It has been a tough week, allergies and a mild case of bronchitis has had me down, but the trip has been booked for nearly a year and I was determined to go.

It took us about three hours to get to DFW Airport and checked in with Air Canada. The first leg takes us to Toronto, then after a lengthy layover we fly to Deer Lake and overnight before heading to camp.

Check in went fairly quick so we had a bit of time before boarding the plane. The flight was smooth, and we talked most of the way passing time. It is a relatively short flight to Toronto (less than 3 hrs) and after we landed and cleared customs, we went on to baggage claim to retrieve the rifles. After a half hour, nothing appeared at oversize, so I went to the Air Canada baggage help desk. The attendant informed me there is another oversized baggage belt at the end of the hall. Low and behold, the rifle was there so off to Customs. The RCMP Officer was very friendly and efficient with the paperwork. It was my son’s first time travelling with a rifle, so he got a good lesson and positive experience. After exiting, we took the gun box to the bag drop then went on to spend the next few hours in the airport lounge.

We boarded our flight to Deer Lake, and it ended up being delayed by about 20 minutes. The flight was another two and a half hours, so I caught a nap and woke before landing. The flight had a lot of hunters on it, including one gentleman that I had met in Texas previously, so we chatted while waiting on luggage. I was happy to see my duffle pretty quick then my rifle case followed. As more people retrieved their luggage the carousel finally stopped, and Grants bag was missing. So, he has no clothes but more importantly all our ammo is in his bag. The Air Canada Rep said there is a flight at 2PM and again at midnight so we can only be hopeful the bag comes in on the two o’clock flight as are set to go to camp today.

The shuttle took us and the last few hunters that also arrived without some or all of their luggage to the Holiday Inn and we were checked in and to our room by 2AM.

Day 2

I woke to the sound of a text at 6:50 from Fred Thorne the outfitter asking me what the status was. I went online to check the baggage tracer and it did not work. I called Air Canada, and the representative knows nothing except the last time the bag was scanned was in Toronto. She said it will take 24-48 hours for an update, totally unacceptable since we only have six days to hunt. Fred delayed our chopper flight to camp until late afternoon. Fred has a couple of loaner guns, and we took a half hour cab ride to Corner Brook to the Canadian Tire and bought boots and clothes for Grant. Back to the hotel then turned around and headed for the airport to see if the bag had arrived.

The attendant checked the computer and said the bag was there, but after more than 45 minutes of waiting she finally took Grant to look in the back at all of the unclaimed baggage and it was nowhere in sight. Not real sure what’s going on with Air Canada, but they don’t have a very efficient system for tracking lost bags. Two of the other hunters who didn’t get bags last night both got theirs, but ours are missing.

I took a cab back to the hotel, gathered up all the gear and we went to the helicopter charter hangar and waited a few hours to get ferried to the camp. It was a short twenty-minute flight to camp, and we settled in the freshly built cabin build on the shores of Caines Lake.
View attachment 560857
Grant and I will share a room and the other hunter in the second room. A modern cabin with all amenities, not large but very nice. Michael the other guide was starting dinner while we sorted our gear out and Morgan grilled the steaks. After dinner, we made plans for the morning hunt, we will have breakfast at 6 and head out. It’s great to be right in the heart of the hunting area as we don’t have to travel very far to be in prime moose country.
View attachment 560858
JES, you’ve got a good attitude about your lost luggage and try not to let it ruin your Hunt (easy to say—-harder to do). Every away hunt I’ve ever done - that requires air travel w/firearms - is an adventure....and the “adventure” starts when I check in the bags, it is always different and no 2 TSA agents have ever done it the exact same way, even when it goes ok - always stressful. Whenever I finally see my firearms arrive at my final hunting destination -I consider that “My 1st Trophy” and then I start my Hunt !
 
good luck with the hunt. I’m currently in Canada and flying with Air Canada. They certainly do things differently when it comes to flying with firearms. I was certainly relieved when both my rifle and ammunition arrived on the same flight as me.
 
Don’t let the luggage issues put a damper on the trip! Looking forward to the next instalment of this adventure!
 
Day 3

The cabin was abuzz before 6 and I lay in bed half asleep. Grant woke me a 6 and I dressed then headed for coffee. It’s cool this morning but certainly not cold. Michael made sausage, eggs and toast for everyone and after breakfast, Morgan and the other hunter were getting ready to leave. Sunrise is at 7:21 so we got out about 7 and walked a half mile or so behind camp.

Michael stopped at a spot overlooking a large area of bog interspersed with trees and began to call. We stayed for three hours then made our way back to camp for a snack and to get the Argo as he wants to move to a new location.
NF day 1.jpg

The wind has picked up and the Sun high, so temperatures are rising. We drove for about a half hour then walked about a quarter mile to set up and call. Michael called periodically for the next nearly 4 hours with no bulls responding. He said he had one on the last hunt that didn’t make a noise for nearly 3 hours of calling. Finally, the bull showed himself and the hunter shot him at the end of the day.

We moved about a quarter mile again and set up to call. The habitat looks perfect, but the weather is not favorable. This is reminiscent of my moose hunt last year, it was just too warm and too nice for moose hunting!

A slow day, fortunately the wind decreased a bit towards sunset and the call was echoing off the distant hills. We will stay until sunset in hopes that a bull comes to investigate the calling. Michael called it a day at sunset, and we made our way back to camp and got in by 7:45

Morgan and his hunter showed up about a half hour later and said they called a big bull first thing this morning but before he came out of the timber a cow called him and led him away. After dinner we called it a night, seems everyone is beat.

Day 4

Grant woke me again, I slept well last night. He had a voicemail his bag finally arrived, so I texted Fred to give the charter company a heads up. They’ll drop it at camp next time they are in the area.

A beautiful warm blue bird day, exactly what we don’t want. We took the Argo a long distance then walked another half mile to a place Michael wanted to call.

NF Argo.jpg


It was a gorgeous morning, not the best for moose hunting but a real Blessing to be in the outdoors with my son. We talked how this is the first time in as long as we can remember we were together, not working on something! It was nice to get to talk, laugh and catch up.

Michael called periodically for the next few hours with no response. He knew it was a long shot on a hot, clear day but he had to try. We moved places around lunchtime and called right near a trail on a small river. After a few hours this once again proved fruitless.

We headed back to camp late afternoon as Michael wants to try a bog not far from camp. When we got back Morgan and the other hunter were there. They had a great morning, called in a small bull, saw the big bull once again in the timber but couldn’t get a shot. It seems they found a honey hole with a lot of moose. Morgan speculates it’s a breeding ground that has drawn in the moose but they are staying in the heavy timber.
NF day 2.jpg

They left about 5 and we followed shortly after. We walked about a half hour and called until last light. No responses so we called it a day at legal shooting hour and walked back to camp.

Four days left for two bulls and yet to get a response, time is ticking so we are praying for a weather change.

Day 5

I woke before six today and waited for the cabin to come to life. It is overcast and appears to have rained overnight. It seems a little cooler, but the cloud cover should certainly be an improvement. We got out of camp after 7 and made way to the same spot we called from yesterday morning.

It’s cool but not cold. Michael called off and on as I rested my eyes. Shortly after 9 I was looking around when Michael motioned and pointed to my right. A bull staring at us at about 75 yards, came in silently. He was a 3x3, probably 2 to 3 years old. We looked at each other for a minute or so then he buggered off.

About 15 minutes later Michael spotted a bull walking along a distant tree line. We checked him out as he walked slowly, bigger than the last bull but still no palmation, another 3x3. He stopped and looked our direction when Michael called but kept on walking. So, no real response to the call appeared to be cruising.

We glassed for the next hour or so then moved about a half mile to another location to start calling. A light rain falls from time to time but nothing unbearable. The overcast sky has kept it much cooler today so hopefully the bulls will be active. The wind started to pick up a little bit, the cloud cover stayed with us. No action here so around half past one we changed locations and Michael started to call.

About 4:30 we headed back to the cabin as Michael wanted to try another spot up the lake. We walked about a mile and a half then turned up through the willow brush for about a hundred yards and popped out in a meadow.

We set up and he called until sunset. At one point Michael thought he heard a bull but nothing further. The cloud cover was still heavy, darkness came quick so we made our way back to the cabin along the rocky beach. The slippery rocks took a toll on my knees and ankles so after a quick shower and dinner I was down.

The hunt has now reached the halfway point and the clock ticking.
 
Day 6

I was up before 6 and smelled coffee brewing so I got dressed. I could feel it was a bit colder this morning which will certainly help. Today we will hunt the lake areas. Morgan and his hunter will take the Argo and hunt the another area in the high country. It seems they want a change of scenery and a new place to hunt.

We started walking before sunrise and after about forty-five minutes reached the same place we hunted last evening. Before Michael started calling we hear a faint cow call off in the woods.

Michael started calling and after a while we heard the sound of antlers rubbing against a tree. This went on periodically for more than a half hour, but the bull never grunted.

Finally, almost directly in the sun a 4-point bull trailed behind a young cow as she came out of the forest. You could see the steam rising off of their bodies in the cold morning air. The cow moved slowly towards the sound of the call with the bull in tow. She never came closer than 110 yards and finally turned and walked away.

Michael continued calling and whispered to me “theirs another bull coming”. I never heard the cracking of branches that he did but about twenty minutes later Grant said, “there’s a bull.” I couldn’t find it and asked where. He said, “they’re in the shadows to the right of where the others came out”. I scanned the tree line and found the bull, a young 6 point. He trotted across the meadow, following in the general direction of the others.

Things went quiet so after about an hour we moved further up the lake and set up in a new location. The routine continued, calling periodically with no response. Then a little after one a cow called back a few times then quit. Still no bulls responding, seems strange as the rut should be in full swing.
Nf river.jpg

We went back to the place we called this morning and when we approached the bog a cow trotted off. After a bit of calling the young 4 point from yesterday appeared and he was quite curious. He came to within 30 yards as Michael softly called.

Since he would continue to hang out around us, we decided to move and spent the last hour of the day calling in a big bog behind camp. Once again, a fruitless effort.

Back in camp about a half hour after sunset Morgan and the other hunter shows up an hour later. They saw six bulls today, all small. Micheal fried up some codfish for dinner and everyone hit the sack after eating. Seems the week has caught up with the group.

Day 7

I woke to noise in the cabin at 6 and headed for coffee. There’s a hard frost this morning which certainly helps our cause. We took off as light started to break and drove the Argo back to our regular spot then walked to the calling place. A perfect morning, still and cold. Michael called and at one point thought he heard a bull grunt. But after another couple of hours of calling, no more response and nothing in sight.

Around 9:40 we heard a shot in the distance followed quickly by another. It is the other hunter so hopefully he connected with a bull. Just before 11 we walked about a half hour further into the valley to a new location. A beautiful spot, it looks like perfect Moose habitat. Still no wind, overcast and cool. Hopefully something will happen today.

By half past three we moved on to spend the balance of the day at the far end of the lake. We passed Morgan and the other hunter, he shot the 4 point we called yesterday. He was set on taking home some meat and with tomorrow being the last day he got it done.

We were set up by 4:30 and Michael began the periodic calling. Finally, about 7:10 I called it, and we made way for camp. Morgan and the other hunter cooked a big Turkey dinner, and I turned in shortly after dinner.

Day 8

I was up real early today, since this is the last day of the hunt, I guess my mind was working overtime.

Morgan would go with us today; he wants to head to the high country, so we took off before sunrise. It took more than an hour to reach the place he wanted to call and visibility was very good. Unfortunately, we have gusty winds today which hinders the calling.

After a couple of hours in the first spot with no success we moved on. The Argo struggled to get up a brushy hill, so we offloaded and Morgan drove it up. As we crested the top, Michael spotted a moose across a small pond about 300 yards away. Glassing confirmed he was a yearling 3 point, so Morgan started the call and the bull came straight in.

A few minutes later Grant spotted a cow in some heavy brush, so we all scanned around her to see if she had a bull with her. We watched her move away towards the thick timber on top of the opposite ridge.

I was sitting back, looking across the valley when Michael said “look there, three moose and one is a big bull”. We saw the bull chasing a cow across a bog near the treeline. From 1006 yards I could see he had good palmation, a big bull for sure. Its 12:26, an odd time of day for moose to be active, especially in this warm weather. We watched them settle down in some brush on the treeline and we made a plan to go to them and try to call the Bull with scraping and grunting. It took about a half hour to cut the distance in half and we slowly made way through the heavy brush. Unfortunately it was head high in some places and visibility was poor. The wind was good, slightly crossing but in our favor.

We got to within 150 yards of a dead tree we marked where they were when Michael started scraping the brush. Grant saw a cow trot off and enter the timber while I struggled to catch up with Morgan as he was ahead trying to locate the bull. When I got to Morgan under a small tree, he climbed up about 9 feet to get better visibility and he saw the big bull enter the timber right where the cow did. The wind switched on our final approach and they caught our scent. So close, but I never saw the bull in the heavy brush.
NF glassing.jpg


We made our way back to the Argo then across the valley to get high ground and glass in hopes the bull would come back out. After 5 hours, we made the decision to head back towards camp in hopes we would catch a bull out in a bog while driving.

As the sun went behind the hills and darkness fell, I knew the hunt was over and it will be another season until I can pursue Canadian Moose again and hopefully complete my quest for the North American 29.

I’ve said it time and time again, the weather is the biggest determining factor in hunting most of the North American Big Game Animals. You can be in the best area with experienced guides at what should be the ideal time of the year to hunt. But if its too hot or too windy or too foggy, you wont connect with your quarry regardless of how hard you hunt.

After a big steak dinner and the last glass of whiskey I called it a day and hit the sack. The helicopter came in around 11:30 and took us back to Deer Lake. We have an overnight there then head home in the morning.
NF heli.jpg


I had a great time with my son Grant, but he was a bit disappointed as he wanted to be with me when I collected my final specie in the quest. He’s now learned first hand what he has heard me say for years about hunting. Regardless of the outcome, we made the best of the situation, had a good time and some laughs in Gods amazing outdoors. The memories made are the real trophy of the hunt.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Great writeup! Thanks for taking us along. Hopefully next time you will see and get a bigger one.
 
Let´s hope for a really nice one next time !
 
Warm windy weather and Moose hunting sure don't mix well.

I appreciate your tenacity. Good luck next year.
 
Dang! I thought you had your slam in the bag this year. I guess its called hunting and not shooting. Good luck for next year. Glad you got the time in the bush with your son.
Bruce
 
Enjoyed your report even though I was disappointed for you.

Hunting with your son. Priceless!
 
Day 6

I was up before 6 and smelled coffee brewing so I got dressed. I could feel it was a bit colder this morning which will certainly help. Today we will hunt the lake areas. Morgan and his hunter will take the Argo and hunt the another area in the high country. It seems they want a change of scenery and a new place to hunt.

We started walking before sunrise and after about forty-five minutes reached the same place we hunted last evening. Before Michael started calling we hear a faint cow call off in the woods.

Michael started calling and after a while we heard the sound of antlers rubbing against a tree. This went on periodically for more than a half hour, but the bull never grunted.

Finally, almost directly in the sun a 4-point bull trailed behind a young cow as she came out of the forest. You could see the steam rising off of their bodies in the cold morning air. The cow moved slowly towards the sound of the call with the bull in tow. She never came closer than 110 yards and finally turned and walked away.

Michael continued calling and whispered to me “theirs another bull coming”. I never heard the cracking of branches that he did but about twenty minutes later Grant said, “there’s a bull.” I couldn’t find it and asked where. He said, “they’re in the shadows to the right of where the others came out”. I scanned the tree line and found the bull, a young 6 point. He trotted across the meadow, following in the general direction of the others.

Things went quiet so after about an hour we moved further up the lake and set up in a new location. The routine continued, calling periodically with no response. Then a little after one a cow called back a few times then quit. Still no bulls responding, seems strange as the rut should be in full swing.
View attachment 562164
We went back to the place we called this morning and when we approached the bog a cow trotted off. After a bit of calling the young 4 point from yesterday appeared and he was quite curious. He came to within 30 yards as Michael softly called.

Since he would continue to hang out around us, we decided to move and spent the last hour of the day calling in a big bog behind camp. Once again, a fruitless effort.

Back in camp about a half hour after sunset Morgan and the other hunter shows up an hour later. They saw six bulls today, all small. Micheal fried up some codfish for dinner and everyone hit the sack after eating. Seems the week has caught up with the group.

Day 7

I woke to noise in the cabin at 6 and headed for coffee. There’s a hard frost this morning which certainly helps our cause. We took off as light started to break and drove the Argo back to our regular spot then walked to the calling place. A perfect morning, still and cold. Michael called and at one point thought he heard a bull grunt. But after another couple of hours of calling, no more response and nothing in sight.

Around 9:40 we heard a shot in the distance followed quickly by another. It is the other hunter so hopefully he connected with a bull. Just before 11 we walked about a half hour further into the valley to a new location. A beautiful spot, it looks like perfect Moose habitat. Still no wind, overcast and cool. Hopefully something will happen today.

By half past three we moved on to spend the balance of the day at the far end of the lake. We passed Morgan and the other hunter, he shot the 4 point we called yesterday. He was set on taking home some meat and with tomorrow being the last day he got it done.

We were set up by 4:30 and Michael began the periodic calling. Finally, about 7:10 I called it, and we made way for camp. Morgan and the other hunter cooked a big Turkey dinner, and I turned in shortly after dinner.

Day 8

I was up real early today, since this is the last day of the hunt, I guess my mind was working overtime.

Morgan would go with us today; he wants to head to the high country, so we took off before sunrise. It took more than an hour to reach the place he wanted to call and visibility was very good. Unfortunately, we have gusty winds today which hinders the calling.

After a couple of hours in the first spot with no success we moved on. The Argo struggled to get up a brushy hill, so we offloaded and Morgan drove it up. As we crested the top, Michael spotted a moose across a small pond about 300 yards away. Glassing confirmed he was a yearling 3 point, so Morgan started the call and the bull came straight in.

A few minutes later Grant spotted a cow in some heavy brush, so we all scanned around her to see if she had a bull with her. We watched her move away towards the thick timber on top of the opposite ridge.

I was sitting back, looking across the valley when Michael said “look there, three moose and one is a big bull”. We saw the bull chasing a cow across a bog near the treeline. From 1006 yards I could see he had good palmation, a big bull for sure. Its 12:26, an odd time of day for moose to be active, especially in this warm weather. We watched them settle down in some brush on the treeline and we made a plan to go to them and try to call the Bull with scraping and grunting. It took about a half hour to cut the distance in half and we slowly made way through the heavy brush. Unfortunately it was head high in some places and visibility was poor. The wind was good, slightly crossing but in our favor.

We got to within 150 yards of a dead tree we marked where they were when Michael started scraping the brush. Grant saw a cow trot off and enter the timber while I struggled to catch up with Morgan as he was ahead trying to locate the bull. When I got to Morgan under a small tree, he climbed up about 9 feet to get better visibility and he saw the big bull enter the timber right where the cow did. The wind switched on our final approach and they caught our scent. So close, but I never saw the bull in the heavy brush.
View attachment 562166

We made our way back to the Argo then across the valley to get high ground and glass in hopes the bull would come back out. After 5 hours, we made the decision to head back towards camp in hopes we would catch a bull out in a bog while driving.

As the sun went behind the hills and darkness fell, I knew the hunt was over and it will be another season until I can pursue Canadian Moose again and hopefully complete my quest for the North American 29.

I’ve said it time and time again, the weather is the biggest determining factor in hunting most of the North American Big Game Animals. You can be in the best area with experienced guides at what should be the ideal time of the year to hunt. But if its too hot or too windy or too foggy, you wont connect with your quarry regardless of how hard you hunt.

After a big steak dinner and the last glass of whiskey I called it a day and hit the sack. The helicopter came in around 11:30 and took us back to Deer Lake. We have an overnight there then head home in the morning.
View attachment 562165

I had a great time with my son Grant, but he was a bit disappointed as he wanted to be with me when I collected my final specie in the quest. He’s now learned first hand what he has heard me say for years about hunting. Regardless of the outcome, we made the best of the situation, had a good time and some laughs in Gods amazing outdoors. The memories made are the real trophy of the hunt.
Very well written recap and hunt report - a real hunt, great effort and real persistence !
 
Thank you for the great report. Sounds like you had a great time with your son. Look forward to next years report and you completing your 29.
 
Great effort. Sometimes it is good to know the quest is still there.
 

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