NAMIBIA: A New Lodge For KHOMAS HIGHLAND HUNTING SAFARIS Of Namibia

I like the looks of that new property. Congrats on the eland. Quite the trick for each of you to get one a few hrs apart.
Bruce
 
Ah ha! You must have been leaving as we arrived! We just got home the 20th from an incredible 3 weeks in Namibia, and some incredible hunting with Philip and crew. My report is almost done and ready to post, but I had a hard time limiting my writing. Certainly a trip the wife and I will never forget!
 
Enjoying your report, Paul......and love the mass on that eland bull........wow. I also had the pleasure of using that vintage 375 and was pleased that it had no lawn tractor muffler welded to the front of it to spoil the ambience......your fotos make me want to return, and it may yet happen......Bill
 
Paul. Looks like you and Longwalker are having a great hunt. Look forward to reading more.
 
Ladies & Gents,

Sorry for my delay.
We’ve been super busy here at home.
Alaska summers are very short and always busy for everyone who lives here.
I’m full of more feeble excuses but, I will spare you the misery of reading them.:ROFLMAO:

Back to the hunting report.
On the morning of April 17, as usual, around 6:00 - 6:30 AM, we sat down to another great breakfast of eggs cooked to order, bacon, cheese, thin sliced salamis, toast, butter and jam.
Also as usual, there was the hot coffee, juice, tea and water.

Immediately after breakfast, my wife Kelley and myself, went wandering through the hills as usual, under the much appreciated guidance of PH Isaac and PH Juan.
Both these men were born and raised there and both are total experts.
We were not searching for any specific species, just hunting.
I brought the .375 Mauser and 10 cartridges.
Better to have them and not need them than to need them and not have them.

We rode in the “bakkie” for about 20 or 30 minutes before stopping on a high spot and walking a few paces to a natural overlook, to glass.
There was a critter spotted here and there, but nothing the guys felt were “shooters”.
So we returned to the vehicle and pressed on.
We also checked a couple more places, sometimes just staying on the vehicle to glass, with the motor off to make binocular viewing more steady.

Approximately around 9:30 AM, a herd of blue wildebeest were spotted in the distance, including a few mature bulls.
It was not possible to count these guldang wilderbeasts, as they were in amongst a large area with a lot of trees covering the landscape.
But through my binoculars, I guessed there to be at least 15 or more total.

We made a plan and set out on foot.
After perhaps a bit less than a kilometer, we began to draw near.
So, we slowed down to barely moving at all.
Kelley stayed back a ways, so as to reduce the amount of motion that these animals might potentially focus on.

Many times we would stand totally motionless, for what seemed like a mighty long time, until the animals would again relax a bit.
Then, we would very slowly sneak forward a few paces, always trying to keep thick bushes between us and them.
Also at this stage, I kept my eyes looking only downward, so as to avoid giving them the stalk ruining “predator’s stare”.
And it helps me also not to trip over a stone, crunch dried leaves or snap a stick under my shoes.

Just as it seemed they all had decided to run away, suddenly one last bull walked part way out of the shadows and sort of into view.
What little I could see of his head quickly turning this way and that, made it seem like he was thinking, “Hey, where did everyone go” ?
Isaac set the sticks and I immediately placed the rifle.

I could not see very much of this bull clearly but, his right shoulder was visible (almost broadside for once), at no more than approximately 40 paces.
From the time I hastily placed my rifle onto the sticks and Isaac whispered “shoot” was perhaps 3 seconds or even a little less.
Boom and down he went.

Even though I’ve lost count of the number of blue wildebeest I’ve shot over the years nonetheless, I have never bothered to learn how people properly judge their horns.
However, this one looks good to me and I’m quite happy with it.
Refer to the below attached picture.

Kelley soon then joined us for photos.
The best part of taking this particular animal is that when she saw it, she remarked that the skin might make into a perfect bed spread.
Far be it from me to say otherwise.
“Happy wife, happy life” is a fine concept and I find comfort in it.
So, Trophaendienste Taxidermy in Windhoek will be tanning this one’s hide.
And, they will also be arranging the skull + horns onto an oval wood plack, aka: “European Mount”.

So after the photos and loading this wildebeest into the backie, we climbed aboard and rolled back to camp, arriving in time for lunch.
Kelley decided to ride now inside the passenger part of the vehicle, as she was concerned with the possibility of a tick or ticks, abandoning the carcass and becoming her unwelcome companion/s.
I was unable to convince her otherwise.
However, I have seen so few ticks (or mosquitoes) up there in the Highlands that I do not myself worry about them.

It’s midnight here where I live and so, I will close for now.
There will be more narrative and photos to follow from this most recent hunting and fishing trip to Namibia.

Thanks for reading,
Velo Dog.

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The best part of taking this particular animal is that when she saw it, she remarked that the skin might make into a perfect bed spread.

You are a very lucky and blessed man to have such a wonderful wife. Congrats!
 
Ladies & Gents,

Sorry for my delay.
We’ve been super busy here at home.
Alaska summers are very short and always busy for everyone who lives here.
I’m full of more feeble excuses but, I will spare you the misery of reading them.:ROFLMAO:

Back to the hunting report.
On the morning of April 17, as usual, around 6:00 - 6:30 AM, we sat down to another great breakfast of eggs cooked to order, bacon, cheese, thin sliced salamis, toast, butter and jam.
Also as usual, there was the hot coffee, juice, tea and water.

Immediately after breakfast, my wife Kelley and myself, went wandering through the hills as usual, under the much appreciated guidance of PH Isaac and PH Juan.
Both these men were born and raised there and both are total experts.
We were not searching for any specific species, just hunting.
I brought the .375 Mauser and 10 cartridges.
Better to have them and not need them than to need them and not have them.

We rode in the “bakkie” for about 20 or 30 minutes before stopping on a high spot and walking a few paces to a natural overlook, to glass.
There was a critter spotted here and there, but nothing the guys felt were “shooters”.
So we returned to the vehicle and pressed on.
We also checked a couple more places, sometimes just staying on the vehicle to glass, with the motor off to make binocular viewing more steady.

Approximately around 9:30 AM, a herd of blue wildebeest were spotted in the distance, including a few mature bulls.
It was not possible to count these guldang wilderbeasts, as they were in amongst a large area with a lot of trees covering the landscape.
But through my binoculars, I guessed there to be at least 15 or more total.

We made a plan and set out on foot.
After perhaps a bit less than a kilometer, we began to draw near.
So, we slowed down to barely moving at all.
Kelley stayed back a ways, so as to reduce the amount of motion that these animals might potentially focus on.

Many times we would stand totally motionless, for what seemed like a mighty long time, until the animals would again relax a bit.
Then, we would very slowly sneak forward a few paces, always trying to keep thick bushes between us and them.
Also at this stage, I kept my eyes looking only downward, so as to avoid giving them the stalk ruining “predator’s stare”.
And it helps me also not to trip over a stone, crunch dried leaves or snap a stick under my shoes.

Just as it seemed they all had decided to run away, suddenly one last bull walked part way out of the shadows and sort of into view.
What little I could see of his head quickly turning this way and that, made it seem like he was thinking, “Hey, where did everyone go” ?
Isaac set the sticks and I immediately placed the rifle.

I could not see very much of this bull clearly but, his right shoulder was visible (almost broadside for once), at no more than approximately 40 paces.
From the time I hastily placed my rifle onto the sticks and Isaac whispered “shoot” was perhaps 3 seconds or even a little less.
Boom and down he went.

Even though I’ve lost count of the number of blue wildebeest I’ve shot over the years nonetheless, I have never bothered to learn how people properly judge their horns.
However, this one looks good to me and I’m quite happy with it.
Refer to the below attached picture.

Kelley soon then joined us for photos.
The best part of taking this particular animal is that when she saw it, she remarked that the skin might make into a perfect bed spread.
Far be it from me to say otherwise.
“Happy wife, happy life” is a fine concept and I find comfort in it.
So, Trophaendienste Taxidermy in Windhoek will be tanning this one’s hide.
And, they will also be arranging the skull + horns onto an oval wood plack, aka: “European Mount”.

So after the photos and loading this wildebeest into the backie, we climbed aboard and rolled back to camp, arriving in time for lunch.
Kelley decided to ride now inside the passenger part of the vehicle, as she was concerned with the possibility of a tick or ticks, abandoning the carcass and becoming her unwelcome companion/s.
I was unable to convince her otherwise.
However, I have seen so few ticks (or mosquitoes) up there in the Highlands that I do not myself worry about them.

It’s midnight here where I live and so, I will close for now.
There will be more narrative and photos to follow from this most recent hunting and fishing trip to Namibia.

Thanks for reading,
Velo Dog.

View attachment 611502
Not sure about a bedspread, but a blue wildebeest rug is something very special indeed.
 
You are a very lucky and blessed man to have such a wonderful wife. Congrats!
Yes thank you PARA45,
Truer words never spoken.
I am repeatedly humbled when I think about why in the world a woman of this high caliber, not to mention very good looking, would even give me a second glance.
I never take her for granted.
 
Not sure about a bedspread, but a blue wildebeest rug is something very special indeed.
As usual, 99% of the time I agree with you Joe, including this rug vs bed spread thing.
At this stage, I have to wait a spell to find out.
Worse case scenario, it will end up a rug.
In our spare room when not occupied, we put a Hartmann’s Zebra skin over the bed.
Looks great but I think it would be too heavy to sleep under comfortably.
 
Is there more? :E Tap Foot::E Tap Foot:
 
Yes.
 
The Oryx & The Oryx Bullet

During the same day that I had bagged the blue wildebeest and after lunch + about an hour nap, we sallied forth again, in search of no particular animal.
We were just hunting.
Repeating the normal plan of driving to various vantage points to glass, eventually we left the vehicle and began hiking.
Now and then we would stop walking, while Juan and Isaac thoroughly looked at this animal or that, via binoculars.

Eventually finding nothing worth shooting and after perhaps about a 3 kilometer walk, the guys found some tracks worth following.
We had only done so for about another kilometer when, we came to a steep but low ridge, running from our left to right.
The hoof tracks indicated that our potential quarry had gone up and over.
Due to it not being very high, climbing it was easy for us.
Plus, the barely a breeze at all was in our favor.

We carefully peeked over our ridge.
There were about a dozen oryx.
They were close, at only perhaps 80 to 100 meters from us and feeding.
We were on our bellies, watching the herd through the foliage on our ridge.
We remained as motionless as possible and we stayed quiet.

There was a small “draw” or low bit of ground between us and them.
They were on the other side of it but nonetheless, a ways lower than we were.
Isaac carefully whispered, “the one laying down”.
I acknowledged with the subtle signal of very slowly raising my thumb.(y)
I had very carefully and slow as a sloth, already positioned my rifle for shooting.
And, I sporadically aimed at the bull’s shoulder from my more or less prone position.

After perhaps 10 to 15 minutes, the herd began to wander off, still grazing.
They were moving slowly to our left.
The bull casually stood up and joined them.
They were walking slowly and ever so slightly quartering in our direction, right to left.
As the target bull reached a spot in his slow travel, as close as he would get to my rifle, I shot him high on the left shoulder.
It was a downhill angle so, the bullet passed through the shoulder and properly lacerated the heart lung zone.
No doubt it ended up low on his right side, probably just slightly behind the right shoulder.
He went right down.

Evidently, I failed to articulate clearly that I wanted any and all bullets from my critters that might be found during the butchering process.
Some of course exited from several animals but this one did not.
Oh well, that is not the end of the world.
This Oryx bullet from Norma ammunition company of Sweden is a good one from my experiences with it.
It seems to behave like the Australian Woodleigh brand (another wonderful soft nose bullet for big game).

Thanks for reading, there is more hunting plus some fishing, yet to be typed.

Cheers,
Velo Dog.

full

full
 
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Congrats and thanks for sharing!
 
Looks like a great area to hunt. Nice animals. Congrats
Bruce
 
Black Wildebeest (“clown of the veld”):

I believe it was April 18 that I shot this particular animal.
At any rate, after another Namibian breakfast of meat, eggs, tomato slices, fruit, homemade bread toasted, butter, jam, coffee or tea, fruit juice and deep well water, off we went, just after sunup.

Incidentally, the water there at Aub Lodge is excellent, no mineral flavor or additives detected.
Presumably this is due to it filtering through a long journey of sand ?
Anyway, hunting yes ……..

So, the morning’s hunt began quite similar to many other mornings.
We drove and glassed then, walked and glassed, rinse and repeat, a couple of times at least.
Sometime around mid day, as we were likely all (I was for sure anyway) getting hungry, we had gone walking from the vehicle.
And after about only half an hour or so, we arrived on foot, at the edge of a wide open area.
It was nearly but not quite flat, covered almost entirely with grass, except for a very few and widely scattered small (camelthorn ?) trees, standing alone here and there.
The closest together trees were perhaps each one 50 to 100 meters apart, in no particular pattern.

It was surrounded with the moderate / not too thick, usual thorn forest and rolling hills, occasional huge slabs of petrified sediment rock “scales” or “fins” here and there, all very typical of the Khomas Hochland Highlands.
We stayed carefully concealed in the shade of the thorn forest and glassed.

Way yonder to the far side (about 300 meters ?) of this clearing, there were perhaps 20 black wildebeest grazing.
Every so often, they would suddenly run with great speed, only to turn anround and run quickly back, more or less to the same place they had started from.
During this strange display of speed, one or more of them would sometimes kick backwards with their hind legs, as if to fight off some invisible pursuer.
Upon frantically returning to their original location, immediately then they would resume grazing, as if nothing had happened in the first place.

We watched and waited as though we were 3 lions lurking in the bush.
Well except that Isaac had very carefully set the sticks, anticipating an eventual clear shot into one of these animals, as they were grazing more or less in our direction.
Eventually, after the herd had returned from practicing one of their wind sprint sessions, and now grazing toward us, one older, very heavy boss bull was appearing to soon be in the clear.

The rest were scattered all about him but, none behind, as he was now at the far side of the herd.
But there were at that time, only two in front of him and they were fairly active in their grazing efforts.
He himself was walking very little - often standing still to feed.
He wasn’t exactly broadside but almost so.
Most of the time, he was facing essentially from my right to left, just ever so slightly quartering toward me (barely), at perhaps something under 200 meters by then.

As the herd all casually ate their grass lunches, the two animals in front of the target bull, grazed their way free of him and boom, I shot him on the left shoulder.
The herd took off running straight away again, except my animal.
He was only able to manage a quick sprint in a tight 180 degree circle and then he dropped dead.
My bullet had crossed through the heart lung process and exited just behind right shoulder.
The exit wound was perhaps half the size of a golf ball.
(The herd this time did not come back).

Isaac packed dirt in the leaky spot for the photos, while Juan walked back to fetch my wife Kelley and the truck.
After awhile (about 30 - 40 minutes), they arrived with the truck, slowly grinding along in 4 wheel drive and low gear.
Kelley of The Khomas, was so delighted with this white tailed gnu aka: black wildebeest that, she asked me if we could maybe have it shoulder mounted.
So now, Trophaendienste Taxidermy, in Windhoek has our deposit for same.
(“Happy wife, happy life”).

And so with that, we made our triumphant return to camp with this strange looking but very good eating critter.

If I’m not mistaken, that’s it for hunting until we take a fishing break and go over to the coast for surf casting and then north east to the Okavango River for tiger fish.
After that we eventually return to Lodge Aub, to stalk at least one more animal.

It’s midnight up here in the frozen north where we live so, time to quit typing for the moment.
Soon I will do a narrative and post
Pictures from the Skeleton Coast shark fishing and Caprivi Strip - Okavango River tiger fish and sight seeing time.

Cheers for now,
Mr. & Mrs. Velo Dog.

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Greetings Fellow Hunters, Fishers and Global Wanderers,

Myself and Mrs. Velo Dog just returned from our hunting and fishing safari, including a 1,000 kilometer Namibian road trip, with @KHOMAS HIGHLAND HUNTING SAFARIS.
Fellow forum member 1dirthawker (Don Hunley) joined us for part of this grand time with Khomas Safaris.

It was epic and I soon will post detailed narratives (in segments), as well as more photos and videos.
Although so far, my attempts at posting videos have been almost always stymied, admittedly by my lack of computer skills.

Have to bounce now due to many overdue errands here at home.
But my report will resume very soon.

Cheers,
Paul & Kelley
(Mr. & Mrs. Velo Dog).

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Super jealous! There is nothing like a road trip in Namibia. I anticipate your full report.
 
Beautiful BW, I love how goofy they are when they run for no apparent reason. Like I said earlier, you are one lucky and blessed man to have such a wonderful wife. Please let her know that. :ROFLMAO:
 
Beautiful BW, I love how goofy they are when they run for no apparent reason. Like I said earlier, you are one lucky and blessed man to have such a wonderful wife. Please let her know that. :ROFLMAO:

Hi again PARA45,

Re: The black wildebeest, thanks, I agree he’s a great specimen.
I’ve hunted one in their original natural habitat, up in The Highveld, on top of the Drakaansburg Mountains.
There it seemed like their horn bosses were not as thick as the ones I’ve shot in Namibia’s Khomas region.
Maybe I’ve just been lucky with the something less than a half dozen that I’ve bagged there.

Re: My wife Kelley, ya she is incredible.
And don’t worry at all, I tell her that all the time.
Rarely do I miss a day, almost never.
She’s more than just pretty although she sure is the most beautiful 63 year old woman I’ve ever seen.
When we met she was the most beautiful 32 year old woman I had ever seen.
And way above average mind also.
Well Ok, other than her obvious bad taste in men.:ROFLMAO:
She was born into a very low income, under achievement, trailer park type family but at 18 bolted out of there with great haste.
She now has a Bachelor’s Degree in History and a Juris Doctor of Law Degree as well.
Sometimes to this day, when she looks at me and smiles, I literally get teary eyed.

Anyway, blah blah blah.
Below are some pictures of her as I am so proud to be her husband.

And I will get back on topic with my next post, with the road trip beginnings, to include a couple days of surf casting, before continuing inland to the north / east,
Caprivi Strip, etc.

Cheers,
Velo Dog.

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