Changing mill surplus bullets to better bullet 30-06

Speedbattle999

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I recently purchased a 180 gr hornedy .308 bullets and on the other hand have several mill surplus 150 gr fmj full ammo dated 1970 ,
My question: if I just pull 150gr of and apply 180 sat hornedy AM I OK ??? Or need to adjust the powder weight too , mill surplus ammo carries 150 gr full metal with 48 gr of pencil point charge . Thanks for helps in advance.
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IMPO; NO.

1) Unknown powder

2) you have a drastic (+30 grains) change in bullet grain weight difference

Unless you first know the type powder and correct powder weight for use with the 180 grain bullets. It's an automatic NO GO.

The bullet weights in my military surplus ammo for my 30-06 M1 Garand are 147 and 174. I don't know the type/brand powder used. Because I don't know the brand/type powder, for me, it's an automatic NO GO.

I'll ask, Are you wanting to change bullet types FMJ to a "soft" point for hunting purposes?

I can only say, it's been rumored, that perhaps some soldiers possibly filed the tip of their FMJ issued ammo off exposing the often lead, or sometimes steel core of the bullet for the purpose of the bullet "mushrooming", creating a greater "wound channel". Of course I can neither confirm nor deny such a thing as it is against the US military Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) and International Law pertaining to the use of other than FMJ bullets/ammunitions.

Why not save the 180 grain bullets and use them to reload your spent cases after your range practice, rather than create a potential safety hazard.
 
If it were my decision to make, I would only replace the 150 with a 150 and find an average powder weight in the pulled ammo and apply that to the new 150's. Neck tension is going to be unknown.

Most all of the mil surp ammo I have pulled have powder weight discrepancies I would not accept.

I have done this, but to tell you the truth I would not do it now. Not worth the hassle.

Put the Mil Surp aside for use in the future as is.:cool:

DB
 
Best solution is go to the range.. have a great time… come home with a pile of once fired brass… load your 180gr bullets..
 
Best solution is go to the range.. have a great time… come home with a pile of once fired brass… load your 180gr bullets..
@mdwest has the best idea - shoot/practice and then reload.

In my opinion some significant safety issues can result with your proposed approach. You may very well end up with a super hot load / increased pressures from the 150 load/bullet and replacing with a 180.
 
I am glad you asked this question. It clearly demonstrates your lack of knowledge of reloading basics. You really should have an experienced mentor help get you started in this. If one is not available, by all means please do not hesitate to seek advice here or on other reloading specific forums. Be safe.
 
Not to pile on, but your proposal is not OK. Do NOT do this. I would suggest you follow this advice.

Best solution is go to the range.. have a great time… come home with a pile of once fired brass… load your 180gr bullets..
 
Short answer is no for reason listed above.

Shoot up your mil spec ammo.
Given the current supply of loading component, you maybe better off buying factory loaded ammo. I load 243 Winchester. My 243 likes and shoots PPU ammo, which is cheap, very well. Again you may better off buying ammo.
If you decide to reload ask questions, find a mentor or two. One of my buddies decided not to reload rifle due to all of the steps that a mutual friend coached him on.
 


To pile on a little further: Be aware that military brass is thick stuff. When reloading, expect more pressure with the same grains payload used for commercial brass. Military brass has less volume in the case. Not a big issue for most normal reloading. Just approach maximum powder loads with caution. Also, for the same reason military brass reloads may not group the same as similar loads in commercial brass. Something to keep in mind at the range and in the field.
 
Usually military ammo is not loaded cery accurately
Its not sniper ammo
In my opinion shoot all away and re use the cases thats it
 
I recently purchased a 180 gr hornedy .308 bullets and on the other hand have several mill surplus 150 gr fmj full ammo dated 1970 ,
My question: if I just pull 150gr of and apply 180 sat hornedy AM I OK ??? Or need to adjust the powder weight too , mill surplus ammo carries 150 gr full metal with 48 gr of pencil point charge . Thanks for helps in advance.View attachment 599477View attachment 599476

I would start by reading a reloading manual to first assimilate the principles of reloading cartridges.

Your plan is everything that you are not allowed to do. It is extremely important that you master the theory of reloading cartridges before you start and if you are not sure of your doing, under the guidance of an experienced person. After that it is much easier to ask precise questions about the reloading of cartridges on the forum.

The reloading of cartridges for hunting, especially when it comes to hunting dangerous game and big game, is very controversial. We as reloaders try to justify it by our competence and our safe approach by the doing of, and therefore it would be better that it stays that way.
 
One other thing, I wouldn't even just pull the military bullets to replace them with the same weight bullet.

While powder if still a little bit difficult to find it is out there and more and more of it is on the shelves of the local retailers. Take that old military powder and dump in into your wife's flower garden, it makes a fine fertilizer.

The work up your own loads using new powder and bullets, the primers will be good for your beginning loads.

As was mentioned, get a couple of loading manuals and read the beginning chapters. There is a lot of information in them besides the loads. Pretty much every bullet manufacture will print a manual using their bullets.
 
Something to be aware of… when it’s time to reload that brass… since it’s mil, it very likely has crimped primer pockets…

You’re going to need to either ream or swage those pockets to be able to get a new primer in there..

Most reloading manuals don’t speak to swaging primer pockets..
 
Something to be aware of… when it’s time to reload that brass… since it’s mil, it very likely has crimped primer pockets…

You’re going to need to either ream or swage those pockets to be able to get a new primer in there..

Most reloading manuals don’t speak to swaging primer pockets..

Sure, it's known, but these are already tips for advanced reloaders.

In our case, I would leave the military cartridges as they are and load the other bullets with new components according to the rules of the art.
 
It is nice to see someone take up the art of reloading. My thought has been provided by ours already. When in doubt, and can’t find it in a reloading manual, reach out here on the forum. There is a wealth of knowledge and experience here. Have fun with your reloading, it is very rewarding to produce a quality cartridge.
 
Go buy a M1 garand and shoot the MilSup ammo, it will be much cheaper in the long run than doing shit like replacing bullets with an unknown charge and unknown powder. Plus you will have a new gun to enjoy
 
IMPO; NO.

1) Unknown powder

2) you have a drastic (+30 grains) change in bullet grain weight difference

Unless you first know the type powder and correct powder weight for use with the 180 grain bullets. It's an automatic NO GO.

The bullet weights in my military surplus ammo for my 30-06 M1 Garand are 147 and 174. I don't know the type/brand powder used. Because I don't know the brand/type powder, for me, it's an automatic NO GO.

I'll ask, Are you wanting to change bullet types FMJ to a "soft" point for hunting purposes?

I can only say, it's been rumored, that perhaps some soldiers possibly filed the tip of their FMJ issued ammo off exposing the often lead, or sometimes steel core of the bullet for the purpose of the bullet "mushrooming", creating a greater "wound channel". Of course I can neither confirm nor deny such a thing as it is against the US military Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) and International Law pertaining to the use of other than FMJ bullets/ammunitions.

Why not save the 180 grain bullets and use them to reload your spent cases after your range practice, rather than create a potential safety hazard.

Correction needed to my above previous thread.

The bullet grain weight of my 30-06 mil surplus ammo is 178 not 174 grains bullet weight.

The 174 grains bullet weight mil surplus ammunition is for my 7.7 Arasaka rifles.
 
Thanks for all good information, I got the point , use the ammo the way it is . I am glad that you all gentlemen are here to help .
Glad you're coming here to ask. I have a huge mess of military brass that I intend to load up this year. Finally got around to buying a primer pocket reamer. That brass is good sturdy stuff if you know how to use it. If you're only shooting it in one gun, I suggest neck sizing only. That will make it last longer. And if you don't have one, a case trimmer is important. Case cleaner not so much. I have managed just fine without one for sixty years.

Don't load the military brass for Africa. In case your ammo is checked by police/airport security, the headstamp needs to match your rifle. Headstamp on military ammo is cryptic and African police are genuinely paranoid about anything military surplus (for good reason). Camo clothing is even legally not allowed in Zimbabwe (but I understand the reg is mostly ignored except military digital pattern).
 

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