Why no 375 RUM?

I have an HS Precision takedown in 300 RUM & 375 RUM and used in on my Cameroon Savannah Safari with great success. I did not order it from HS but purchased second hand and it had been shot very little. The 300 RUM has been my go to cartridge for years and was very happy with the 375 RUM performance. HS builds a fine rifle and this kit lives up to their reputation.
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It solves a problem that very few people have: how to get adequate impact velocity from a 375 caliber bullet at long range.

A 375 H&H or Ruger launches the bullet fast enough for good terminal effect at the ranges most people use a 375 caliber rifle, i.e. fairly close. Very few people have need for a 375 caliber bullet on game at 600 yards and fewer still have need for a bullet with good terminal effect on paper. The price in recoil, muzzle blast and/or rifle weight is just too high for most people to pay to solve a problem they don’t have.

Essentially, it would be a toy for most people. That said, my M82a1 solves even fewer problems and it is (both literally and figuratively) a blast to shoot. We are men and excess is mighty fun for its own sake.
As a dear friend often stated, "Moderation is for pu$$!@$." For what it is worth, the .375 RUM is a great BIG bear gun and sheep gun where you want to anchor a sheep where it stands (or very close to it). This is why the Bansner built rifle I have was commissioned.
 
I have an HS Precision takedown in 300 RUM & 375 RUM and used in on my Cameroon Savannah Safari with great success. I did not order it from HS but purchased second hand and it had been shot very little. The 300 RUM has been my go to cartridge for years and was very happy with the 375 RUM performance. HS builds a fine rifle and this kit lives up to their reputation.
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Man that is an awesome Eland! I'm guessing that's not a Cape Eland but a Lord Derby?
 
Man that is an awesome Eland! I'm guessing that's not a Cape Eland but a Lord Derby?
Yessir, LDE from Cameroon, the 375 RUM dispatched the bull quickly.
 
Many, many reasons. First of all there is simply not a need to push bullets in these larger calibers faster. It makes little sense. Secondly, truth be told, most people can't shoot anything above .375 with proficiency. Beyond that the market for large bore rifles is small to start with.
Hello Mr. Glass. Well I would say “need” is subjective. The 375 RUM can be very capable as a longe range rifle too. Mine is quite capable of taking an elk at 600 yards or to kill an elephant at close range. The 375 RUM has a small but loyal following and for those that can shoot it well (and similiar wildcat cartridges) it’s a great round!

I am a traditionalist at heart though, which is why I’m taking my CZ 416 Rigby on an upcoming buffalo hunt instead of my Remington 700 375 RUM, because I have a slight preference for CRF and a traditional looking African hunting rifle with back up irons but if I had RR 314‘s custom Bansner 375 RUM perhaps I would change my mind!
 
Hello Mr. Glass. Well I would say “need” is subjective. The 375 RUM can be very capable as a longe range rifle too. Mine is quite capable of taking an elk at 600 yards or to kill an elephant at close range. The 375 RUM has a small but loyal following and for those that can shoot it well (and similiar wildcat cartridges) it’s a great round!

I am a traditionalist at heart though, which is why I’m taking my CZ 416 Rigby on an upcoming buffalo hunt instead of my Remington 700 375 RUM, because I have a slight preference for CRF and a traditional looking African hunting rifle with back up irons but if I had RR 314‘s custom Bansner 375 RUM perhaps I would change my mind!
It would certainly thump that elk! I am just saying that it would be difficult for that big bullet to perform optimally from 10yd all the way to 600yds. No matter what you do though that elk will be down!
 
Hello Mr. Glass. Well I would say “need” is subjective. The 375 RUM can be very capable as a longe range rifle too. Mine is quite capable of taking an elk at 600 yards or to kill an elephant at close range. The 375 RUM has a small but loyal following and for those that can shoot it well (and similiar wildcat cartridges) it’s a great round!

I am a traditionalist at heart though, which is why I’m taking my CZ 416 Rigby on an upcoming buffalo hunt instead of my Remington 700 375 RUM, because I have a slight preference for CRF and a traditional looking African hunting rifle with back up irons but if I had RR 314‘s custom Bansner 375 RUM perhaps I would change my mind!
Don't get me wrong, I think it is neat that folks like different calibers. I Have some that are out of the norm as well.
 
A friend of mine has shot hundreds of Buffalo and other game with a .375/400 wildcat which is essentially a .375 RUM. It is a very capable cartridge.
Yes he has, but you meant to say .374/404 cartridge. ;)
 
In a properly built rifle with the right weight and balance it would be fantastic,…usually it’s built on to light a rifle, recoil is sharp much like 378 weatherby.
 
I know there is plenty of hate here for the Weatherby cartridges like 378, 416 and 460 but why does no one talk about or use the 375 RUM? What I've seen looks like it runs on the heels of the 378W, is it to much kick? Lack of availability? Just curious.
What for??
Too fast....hell the 375H&H is 150fps too fast on 300gr.....
 
I chose the .375 wby over the rum specifically so I could load my own for precision OR just use .375 h&h in a pinch. This cape eland with hand loaded 235 tsx. The .375’s are a wonderful family if your find a good one.
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I have one built by Mark Bansner on a CRF Winchester 70 action. Great rifle but it does have a brake and the guy I bought it from misplaced the thread protector. Other than shooting pigs and a couple deer, it has not been utilized as much as I thought I would. I actually planned on taking it to Africa for a one-gun trip, but it has remained stateside. I either need to get a thread protector or fancy electrical tape wrap and take it over for a trip.
'Used my smaller caliber Bansner rifle nearly every safari (w/ Brake.) If you have the brake on THAT cartridge gun, why not use it? PHs don't like them, but they'll just plug their ears before you fire. The only (significant) difference between an RUM and H&H is that the H&H is a pleasure to shoot and spare ammo will be available (at camp) should the baggage handlers misplace it! I'm thinking Kevin Robertson may make mention of the RUM in his prose...Africa's Most Dangerous comes to mind. 'Have my original Bansner's protector in the bag but have never used it, as the brake is always on (unless cleaning.)
 
The better question is not "why not," but rather "why?"

I remember around 2000, when everyone was on the "faster, faster!" bandwagon. I managed the SAKO line back then, and we chambered the Model 75 in RUM cartridges and other ultra-fast numbers such as the 7mm STW. In the same period, John Lazzeroni would buy hundreds of our SAKO TRG-S rifle in his wonder-cartridges. It's almost as if, like a school of fish, hunters were going in that direction similarly to how so many jumped on the long-distance fad when the 6.5 Creedmoor was introduced. Then, suddenly, the next hot thing were the short magnums: everyone had to have one of those and nobody bought the RUMs, the STW, and the Lazzeronis any more.

I'll always defend the idea that cartridges are a personal thing, and whatever lights your fire is what you should get--the more the merrier. However, I'll also defend my idea that by 1930, all useful big-game cartridges had been invented and perfected, and new hunting cartridges introduced after that were mostly a matter of good marketing on the part of rifle and ammo manufacturers. I can think of very, very few exceptions.
 
I have one built by Mark Bansner on a CRF Winchester 70 action. Great rifle but it does have a brake and the guy I bought it from misplaced the thread protector. Other than shooting pigs and a couple deer, it has not been utilized as much as I thought I would. I actually planned on taking it to Africa for a one-gun trip, but it has remained stateside. I either need to get a thread protector or fancy electrical tape wrap and take it over for a trip.

No different to making a nut, any machine shop should be capable :)
 
I jumped on the 7mm RUM bandwagon in about 2003 and it has been my main big game rifle ever since. I have enough brass and components to last me a lifetime. I also have a bunch of factory ammo I bought when the brass started getting hard to source. I will never run out of ammo for it and when I do decide to sell it, somebody is going to get with it a treasure trove of brass, bullets and loaded ammunition.
 
The better question is not "why not," but rather "why?"

I remember around 2000, when everyone was on the "faster, faster!" bandwagon. I managed the SAKO line back then, and we chambered the Model 75 in RUM cartridges and other ultra-fast numbers such as the 7mm STW. In the same period, John Lazzeroni would buy hundreds of our SAKO TRG-S rifle in his wonder-cartridges. It's almost as if, like a school of fish, hunters were going in that direction similarly to how so many jumped on the long-distance fad when the 6.5 Creedmoor was introduced. Then, suddenly, the next hot thing were the short magnums: everyone had to have one of those and nobody bought the RUMs, the STW, and the Lazzeronis any more.

I'll always defend the idea that cartridges are a personal thing, and whatever lights your fire is what you should get--the more the merrier. However, I'll also defend my idea that by 1930, all useful big-game cartridges had been invented and perfected, and new hunting cartridges introduced after that were mostly a matter of good marketing on the part of rifle and ammo manufacturers. I can think of very, very few exceptions.
Tom I think my biggest problem is I'm a victim of those "super magnum" days. Born in 75 I was in my 20's in the late 90's when 'beanfield rifles'were the craze and everything was about FASTER FASTER FASTER! and being a speedfreak myself I loved the big numbers and I thought the Lazzeroni long action 7mm and 338's were the be all end all in rifles. I guess those days left a permanent dent in my phsychy and I can't get away from the FASTER is better mind frame so the RUM and 378 based Weatherby rounds just hit me in my soft spot. Also I seem to have this scenario in my head where I need to be able to make a possibly long follow up shot to stop my trophy animal from being lost. In my twisted demented little world cartridges don't start getting outrageous and overdone until you hit the 577 T-rex and 600 OK.
 
The creedmoor, prc, saum, the wby and the noslers-faster, faster , farther, farther! And now they come pre threaded for a suppressor!
I like what was said about the practical calibers since 1930-very much agree even tho I have fallen into the traps more than once
 
i like mine a bunch. i bought it earlier this year. there should be some on the distributor's shelves for a while. the SPS was also made in .375 Ultra for a while.

but brass is also difficult to find right now. gonna have to buy another 500 when it becomes available.
 

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