Why Hunting Always Matters

375 Ruger Fan

Gold supporter
AH legend
Joined
Jun 14, 2015
Messages
3,709
Reaction score
5,394
Location
Houston, Texas
Media
216
Articles
4
Hunting reports
Africa
7
USA/Canada
4
Australia/NZ
1
Member of
NRA, DSC
Hunted
Namibia, Zimbabwe, New Zealand, South Africa (Eastern Cape & NW), Alaska, TX, LA, MO, OH, MT, ID, WA, WY, Canada (Yukon)
https://www.americanhunter.org/arti...wsletter&utm_medium=insider&utm_campaign=0916


Why Hunting Always Matters
by Shane Mahoney - Thursday, September 22, 2016



Since our beginnings as a species, we have relied directly upon wild creatures for our survival. To sustain our lives and communities, it was inescapable that, like all natural phenomena, human beings would engage directly in the life-and-death struggles that mark the essential and irreducible truth of existence. Perhaps the great American mythologist, Joseph Campbell, put it best when he was asked what he considered the most basic element of our existence to be. His reply: Flesh eats flesh! There is no escaping this fundamental natural law. We may contrive and dream, obfuscate or deny, but in the end our entire lives will be testament to this unalterable truth. Life, it will be proven, is a death-dependent process.

So where in our complex modern world does hunting fit? Does the legal pursuit and killing of wild creatures by individual hunters for personal use have a role to play? Is it fair to regard hunting as a cruel anachronism, a frivolous activity that has no merit outside of personal gratification for the hunter? These are profound questions with wider implications for society than most of us realize. After all, we kill and consume vast numbers of domestic and wild creatures every year to feed human beings. This hunting issue, no matter how simplified some would like to make it, won’t be anything less than a complex amalgam of social, cultural, economic and political realities.

Interestingly, some of the most intense debates on hunting tend to center upon predators: the lion, the leopard, the wolf, the bear, etc. The hunting of these large and potentially dangerous animals is constantly discussed in the media, and the debate is at a boiling temperature almost all of the time. This is intriguing, given that such animals do not fit the innocent and vulnerable persona as portrayed for deer, for example, in “Bambi.” Predators are certainly beautiful and awe-inspiring, but so are all wild creatures. Furthermore, predators frequently wound and kill human beings and are often significant as marauders of livestock, thereby visiting real hardship upon rural peoples especially, in various parts of the world. Are the lives and livelihoods of human beings of no concern to those who oppose hunting? Does concern for human dignity fall below that for the lion and the wolf?

This question, combined with hunting’s unique record of conservation achievement and leadership, makes it both curious and difficult to understand the negative stereotyping directed at today’s hunters. On the North American continent, hunting provides massive amounts of high-quality, truly organic meat to tens of millions of our citizens every year. It is also proven to have worked for the conservation of wildlife and to have benefitted a wide array of wild habitats and species, many of which are not hunted at all. Indeed, the role of hunting in conservation worldwide is recognized by some of our most prominent international conservation organizations, such as the World Wildlife Fund and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, and in North America by highly regarded institutions like Ducks Unlimited. Hunting has also spawned a dizzying array of non-governmental organizations around the world, every one of which works to finance conservation in important ways.

Much of the bias against hunting stems from a lack of knowledge. It is easy to misrepresent and criticize what is not understood. Trophy hunting is probably the best example of this within the hunting world. More people, when asked, support hunting for meat than trophy hunting, where individuals travel abroad to engage in the trophy hunting experience, but do not necessarily pursue the hunt to procure the meat. They may return with some memento of the hunt such as horns, antlers or tusks. Stereotyped as wealthy egotists, killing wildlife frivolously and without contributing to either wildlife conservation or society, trophy hunters are often thought by non-hunters to represent the lowest rung of the ladder.

What is not understood is that the fees paid by trophy hunters are what often enable large hunting tracts or concessions to be managed and safe-guarded by costly anti-poaching patrols, or that without this hunting value placed on wild creatures, the lands they occupy would be broken up or turned to domestic livestock production. In either scenario, wildlife will lose. Obviously, the North American hunter who travels to Africa, for example, does not plan to ship home the meat from his kudu, or wildebeest, or elephant. However, in the majority of cases, the meat from animals taken provides a myriad of wildlife and community supportive activities, including land and wildlife protection, local employment and food.

Hunting is not for everyone, nor will it be possible to defend every aspect of it to everyone. Nevertheless, the facts are clear with respect to its overall impact on conservation. Deemed by some to be cruel, unnecessary and an institution long past its time, the fact remains that hunting endures as a vital force in the lives of millions of people, and in the conservation programs of many countries. A concern for the lives and deaths of all animals is an incredibly important issue for modern society to debate and reconcile and, in pursuit of a practical and reasoned position, it is inevitable that legal, fair-chase hunting should be part of this debate. However, any fair evaluation must be prepared to consider the complexities facing our world, the demands for food of our global human population, the search for sustainable resource use practices, and the means by which conservation funding and leadership can be secured. Animal death will inevitably surface in the context of these issues, but oddly enough, hunting, man’s oldest and most successful try at life, will surface as one positive means of achieving them all.

About the Author
Shane Mahoney is considered one of the leading international authorities on wildlife conservation. A rare combination of historian, scientist and philosopher, he brings a unique perspective on wildlife issues that has motivated and inspired audiences around the world. Named one of the 10 Most Influential Canadian Conservationists by Outdoor Canada magazine and nominated for Person of the Year by Outdoor Life magazine, he has received numerous awards, including the Public Service Award of Excellence from the government of Newfoundland and Labrador, and International Conservationist of the Year by Safari Club International. Born and raised in Newfoundland, he brings to his writings and lectures a profound commitment to rural societies and the sustainable use of natural resources, including wildlife and fish.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

johnnyblues

AH ambassador
Joined
Jun 13, 2013
Messages
6,843
Reaction score
7,171
Location
Georgia
Media
193
Articles
1
Hunting reports
Africa
10
Hunted
USA, ALASKA Canada, New Zealand, Mexico Africa.
Good read thanks.
 

cpr0312

AH ambassador
Joined
Jul 21, 2011
Messages
9,459
Reaction score
10,247
Location
North Carolina
Media
346
Articles
1
Hunting reports
Africa
6
USA/Canada
1
Australia/NZ
1
Member of
NRA Life Member
Hunted
US (All over), New Zealand, South Africa(Northern Cape, Northwest), Zimbabwe, Zambia
Thanks for sharing
 

edward

Gold supporter
AH legend
Joined
Feb 8, 2012
Messages
2,383
Reaction score
2,738
Media
261
Articles
11
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
safari club,nra,d.s.c.
Hunted
south africa and zimbabwe.alaska and several lower 48 states.
ill never understand how antis accept the slaughter of live stock to feed them selves,but profess to hate hunting which at least gives the wild animal a chance at survival that live stock never gets.
and make no bones about it,the animals that us hunters take in foreign country's does feed people.it is not wasted.
 

35bore

AH legend
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Messages
2,394
Reaction score
831
Media
74
Member of
NRA,Missouri hunters ed, SCI, Owensville Gun Club, Quail Forever
Hunted
USA, South Africa, France
ill never understand how antis accept the slaughter of live stock to feed them selves,but profess to hate hunting which at least gives the wild animal a chance at survival that live stock never gets.
and make no bones about it,the animals that us hunters take in foreign country's does feed people.it is not wasted.
I completely agree.

If the anti hunting group were to visit a slaughter house, (where their Mc Nuggets, or Whopper, or leg of lamb, ((you get the point)), came from. I will never be able to comprehend the fact that they (antis) cannot accept that we are hunters, but we HAVE TOO accept the dumbing down of society i.e. the new Marijuana laws being forced upon us.

The way I see it, if you want to kill yourself with drugs, go for it. I'll take my chances with a Lion or Cape Buffalo. In my mind it would at least be an equal playing field with the later of the two.

We'll just never see their point of view (thank god) , and they will never see ours. Again though, I'll choose our side, thank you.

We'll put together post btw.
 

50lawman

Bronze supporter
AH member
Joined
Oct 30, 2011
Messages
48
Reaction score
39
Location
Honolulu, Hawaii
Media
9
Member of
SCI/ North American Hunt CLub
Hunted
Namibia
ill never understand how antis accept the slaughter of live stock to feed them selves,but profess to hate hunting which at least gives the wild animal a chance at survival that live stock never gets.
and make no bones about it,the animals that us hunters take in foreign country's does feed people.it is not wasted.
Edward you are so right. Prior to my current career I was a Owner Operator hauling swinging beef from slaughter houses to military bases. I was in Slidell Louisiana at a packing house waiting for my trailer to be loaded with frozen beef quarters hung from the trailer rafters. I noticed the corrals where they had 20-25 head of cattle held. I watched as single cattle were herded down a long, narrow chute to a Vshape clamp that the calf was stopped on. The clamp then closed pinning the animal. A worker came out of a nearby door and popped it on the head with a blank fired bolt driver that stunned the animal. The clamp released and tilted toward the building which then had a roll up door open depositing the stunned animal inside. The rollup closed awaiting the next animal, then clamp, bang, tilt , door opens, deposit animal, door closed, repeat. My curiosity got the better of me and I walked over to the door that the worker with the bang-stick would come out of. When he came out I asked him if I could peek inside to see what was going on. Sure, no problem he said with a grin. Was that a warning? As he popped the clamped animal then went back inside I followed him in. What looked like a scene from hell, red lights, stunned animals throat sliced to bleed out, hooks into rear hocks, then lifted up and gutted, head removed, constantly move up to the next station where it was expertly caped, then sliced in to quarters. Three stories up the completed process moved the carcasses into the flash freezer. All it took was about 10 minutes or less. It was a continuous conveyor type operation. Sure made me look differently at my Big Mac after that.
 

edward

Gold supporter
AH legend
Joined
Feb 8, 2012
Messages
2,383
Reaction score
2,738
Media
261
Articles
11
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
safari club,nra,d.s.c.
Hunted
south africa and zimbabwe.alaska and several lower 48 states.
Edward you are so right. Prior to my current career I was a Owner Operator hauling swinging beef from slaughter houses to military bases. I was in Slidell Louisiana at a packing house waiting for my trailer to be loaded with frozen beef quarters hung from the trailer rafters. I noticed the corrals where they had 20-25 head of cattle held. I watched as single cattle were herded down a long, narrow chute to a Vshape clamp that the calf was stopped on. The clamp then closed pinning the animal. A worker came out of a nearby door and popped it on the head with a blank fired bolt driver that stunned the animal. The clamp released and tilted toward the building which then had a roll up door open depositing the stunned animal inside. The rollup closed awaiting the next animal, then clamp, bang, tilt , door opens, deposit animal, door closed, repeat. My curiosity got the better of me and I walked over to the door that the worker with the bang-stick would come out of. When he came out I asked him if I could peek inside to see what was going on. Sure, no problem he said with a grin. Was that a warning? As he popped the clamped animal then went back inside I followed him in. What looked like a scene from hell, red lights, stunned animals throat sliced to bleed out, hooks into rear hocks, then lifted up and gutted, head removed, constantly move up to the next station where it was expertly caped, then sliced in to quarters. Three stories up the completed process moved the carcasses into the flash freezer. All it took was about 10 minutes or less. It was a continuous conveyor type operation. Sure made me look differently at my Big Mac after that.
anti hunters are the most hypocritical dog shit garbage in this world,they need to be shoved through the process that their steaks go through.
 

johnnyblues

AH ambassador
Joined
Jun 13, 2013
Messages
6,843
Reaction score
7,171
Location
Georgia
Media
193
Articles
1
Hunting reports
Africa
10
Hunted
USA, ALASKA Canada, New Zealand, Mexico Africa.
What a horrible thing to see. Something I never want to see.
 

Aaron Nietfeld

AH fanatic
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Messages
630
Reaction score
640
Location
Alberta, Canada
Media
7
Articles
2
Hunting reports
Africa
2
Hunted
Canada, South Africa
anti hunters are the most hypocritical dog shit garbage in this world,they need to be shoved through the process that their steaks go through.
Everyone is a hypocrite in one way or another. How many members here are 100% against eating a dog or horse?
 

edward

Gold supporter
AH legend
Joined
Feb 8, 2012
Messages
2,383
Reaction score
2,738
Media
261
Articles
11
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
safari club,nra,d.s.c.
Hunted
south africa and zimbabwe.alaska and several lower 48 states.
Everyone is a hypocrite in one way or another. How many members here are 100% against eating a dog or horse?
the hypocrite says they are against eating dog or horse,then sits down for dinner consisting of dog and horse.
 

K-man

AH elite
Joined
Apr 14, 2013
Messages
1,709
Reaction score
2,859
Media
51
Articles
1
Hunting reports
Africa
2
USA/Canada
3
Hunted
Spain, Alaska, RSA, Zimbabwe, New Zealand, British Columbia, Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming
ill never understand how antis accept the slaughter of live stock to feed them selves,but profess to hate hunting which at least gives the wild animal a chance at survival that live stock never gets.
and make no bones about it,the animals that us hunters take in foreign country's does feed people.it is not wasted.
I agree but the anti-hunter simply accepts meat eating FOR NOW. The end goal for some is no animals eaten or by-products used.
 
 

 

 

Latest posts

Latest profile posts

Just came from a hunt and already longing for the bush
JPmbogo wrote on yhc's profile.
I have factory loaded Hornady 450 NE 3 1/4 DGS that I am selling for not much more than the brass itself at $75/box - see my listing for same.
Justbryan wrote on Rafter JK's profile.
Get Crazy Larry yet? Wishing I had shot Alpine Ibex too!
 
Top