Hunting Elephant with the .505 Gibbs

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Hunting Elephant with the .505 Gibbs
by Daniel McCarthy (2007)

Some years ago when I first became interested in elephant hunting, I made a serious mistake. As I looked at top quality big bore bolt action rifles suitable for elephant hunting, I found that they invariably cost more than US$10,000. Thinking that I could save some money by having rifles built by neighborhood gunsmiths instead of a top riflemaker, I abandoned the plan to purchase a top end gun in favor of having one assembled locally for about $2,000. Eight (8) lower-end custom bolt action rifles later, I have finally learned the error of my thinking. There simply is no way to match the feeding, feel, fit, quality, beauty and reliability of a top end bolt gun with a $2,000 budget.

From the first time I handled one, I have always admired the big bore rifles made by riflemaker Ryan Breeding (www.rbbigbores.com). Ryan offers rifles made to the customer's specifications, but he specializes in big bore dangerous game rifles that are stout, compact, short barreled and have a 5 shot capacity. Invariably I have found that his rifles are extremely well-balanced and have ultra-smooth actions. Ryan typically uses a new production Granite Mountain Arms double square bridge Mauser action as the basis for his big bore rifles. The GMA action is fitted with a Model 70 style safety, an Obendorf-style bolt handle, and has a custom magazine box made by Ryan to perfectly feed the cartridge for which the rifle is built.

During a recent hunt, I was fortunate enough to borrow a Ryan Breeding rifle in .505 Gibbs. Like most of Ryan's big bore rifles, this one was built on a double square bridge magnum Mauser action. The action has a 0.750" bolt body diameter which is ample to accommodate the large rim of the Gibbs cartridge. The action rails are also wide enough to accommodate the Gibbs cartridge without stacking the cartridges too narrowly which can create feeding issues. The magazine box and bottom metal which are custom made by Ryan result in a 5 shot .505 Gibbs rifle. When hunting dangerous game, there is some comfort to be had in have an extra shot or two in the rifle just in case. The stock is made from straight grained English walnut with lots of dark lines and a bit of feathering in the butt. The sights are hand made by Ryan, using an adjustable wide V for the rear and a folding hood front. The sights are very sturdy yet tasteful, making the sights on almost all other rifles look cheap and flimsy. The finished rifle weighs 11.5 pounds with no scope. One could be installed, but a scope is not desireable in such a large caliber. Offhand at 100 yards with iron sights, I could reliably hit a 6 inch bull, and Ryan can hit a steel pig offhand with the rifle out to 300 yards with the iron sights.

I took Ryan's .505 Gibbs on a cow elephant hunt Zimbabwe's bushvelt during September of 2006. The hunt was arranged by Roger Whittall (www.rwsafariss.com), and as I have always found with Roger's company, the hunting was excellent, all details were attended to, and everything went according to plan. Although in September the leaves were off the trees, visibility was limited due to thick jesse and close approaches to elephant were the norm. After some days of not turning up a tuskless elephant, we were fortunate to find a herd with three (3) mature tuskless cow elephant in it. The elephant were spread out and feeding, and as we flanked them for an approach, the wind swirled. One of the tuskless and two junior elephant caught our scent, parted from the herd and ran off. But at a distance of 60 yards, the tuskless turned and came for us. She ran up to a distance of 10 yards, stopped and looked at us from behind a bush. I held my fire as I had told my professional hunter, Peter Wood, that I wanted to shoot an elephant a bit closer than an elephant which I took at 7 yards the year before.

After watching us for a few moments from behind the bush, the tuskless cow turned and ran off to re-join the herd. Pete whispered "Let's go!" and we followed the tuskless quickly hoping to get a shot before she spooked the whole herd. However, this tuskless was not new to dealing with humans and instead of re-joining the herd, she was lying in wait for us behind some trees just 25 yards away. As she saw us approach, she charged with her head swinging slightly from side to side. There was no warning trumpet, just a silent rush. Pete and I shouldered our rifles and as the cow cleared a bush at 6 yards, I let her have a round in the forehead. Instantly she collapsed from the 600 grain Woodleigh FMJ bullet.

Knowing that the rest of the elephant herd was likely to run off at the sound of gunfire, Pete and I hustled over to where they were bunched beneath a tree, nervous and unsure whether to run immediately or not. We walked up and the matriarch cow came forward to meet us. One great thing about elephant hunting is that elephant will often come forward to face a challenge from a human, while buffalo usually just run off. Having just faced a full-on charge, I was a bit nervous and got ahead of myself with the matriarch, taking a frontal brain shot on her at 12 yards rather than letting her come as close as possible. My next shot took the third tuskless from the herd, and the rest of the elephants crashed off through the jesse, leaving us to ponder the downed elephant in the dust and the sun.

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Matriarch cow Elephant at 12 yards just after a frontal brain shot. Note the dust kicked up from her forehead by the bullet.

watermark.php

Matriarch cow Elephant dropping as the rifle recoils.

watermark.php

Charging cow Elephant at 6 yards just after the shot but before she drops.

watermark.php

Charging cow Elephant at 6 yards dropped from a frontal brain shot.

Just four hours later, the safari company staff had all of the elephant skinned, cut up and loaded onto a wagon so that the meat could be distributed to locals. Not being one to miss lunch, however, I took the liberty of borrowing the PH's knife (since I am too lazy to carry one myself) and made some elephant shish kebob that I cooked over a fire and dined on while the safari company staff did the hard work of skinning the elephant and loading slabs of meat onto the wagon. Elephant is a course meat, but the shish kebob was excellent even in the 110 degree F. Zimbabwe sun.

watermark.php

The hard work of butchering Elephant begins.

Also on this hunt, we ran across an ancient and debilitated cow elephant. She was no longer with a herd, being in such poor health that she could not possibly keep up with them. Instead, she stayed in a patch of brush near a river. She was blind in one eye, very gaunt, and close to death. In a situation like that, a decision must be made whether to allow the animal to suffer and die on its own, to be eaten by scavengers, or whether to shoot the animal and recover it as food for the locals. After receiving approval to shoot the elephant, we moved in close in the jess and I shot her at 9 yards with the .505, again with a frontal brain shot.

The load that I used in the .505 Gibbs for all elephant shot this trip was 140.0 grains of H4831 powder behind a 600 grain Woodleigh FMJ bullet with a muzzle velocity of 2250 fps. In the Ryan Breeding rifle, that load generated 99 ft. pounds of recoil, compared to 16 ft. pounds of recoil for a standard 30-06. Nonetheless, the .505 Gibbs was relatively easy to control because the stock was designed with very little drop to minimize muzzle rise, and the butt is wide to spread recoil out over a large area. Due to the very slick action on this rifle, chambering a second round was as fast as I have ever experienced with any bolt action rifle. Nonetheless, I found that 10 to 15 shots per day was all that I cared to shoot as I lost concentration beyond that number. I recovered three of the Woodleigh 600 grain FMJ bullets from the dead elephant. They penetrated 53 to 55 inches after passing completely through the skull on frontal brain shots. Performance of rifle and ammo was excellent.

watermark.php

.505 Gibbs rifle on Granite Mountain Arms magnum Mauser action, built by Ryan Breeding (www.rbbigbores.com) and used for this elephant hunt.

The load I used was one of the lighter ones that Ryan uses in his rifle and was more than enough power for the task at hand. Some of the loads that the rifle liked are as follows:

Bullet Weight - Powder - Charge - Velocity
525 grains - H4831 - 135.0 - 2400 fps
600 grains - H4831 - 140.0 - 2250 fps
600 grains - IMR4350 - 136.0 - 2250 fps
600 grains - IMR4350 - 140.0 - 2500 fps

watermark.php

Woodleigh 600 grain FMJ .505 bullets. The one on the left is unfired, and the other three were recovered from elephant frontal brain shots after penetrating 53 to 55 inches.

For anyone interested in big bore rifles, the .505 Gibbs is a fantastic caliber with more power than most shooters can tolerate on a regular basis. And for a top end custom big bore rifle that is beautiful to look at, 100% reliable and a joy to use, I cannot recommend riflemaker Ryan Breeding highly enough.

watermark.php

.505 Gibbs rifle on Granite Mountain Arms magnum Mauser action, built by Ryan Breeding (www.rbbigbores.com) and used for this elephant hunt.

Peter Wood did a fantastic job of finding and stalking elephants on this safari, as he always does. Sadly, 2007 will be Peter's last year as a professional hunter, after which he will move to Montana to pursue a new way of life.

watermark.php

A charging cow Elephant that we did not have to shoot.

Roger Whittall has a reputation for providing top quality African safaris, and that reputation is very much deserved. Each of my safaris with his company have been in top quality game areas and have been successful in every way. I very much look forward to more safaris with Roger in the future.

Ryan Cox of Zimbabwe took the photos used for this article. Many thanks to Roger Whittall, Ryan Breeding, Peter Wood and Ryan Cox for making this a fantastic hunt.
 
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505ED

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505

Dan is a freind of mine and a heck of a nice guy. Ryan's guns are second to none-- wish I had the scrach for one.

Ed
 

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I've just come across this now, but this is an exceptional article and collection of experiences- not to mention photos.

Thanks,

Angus
 

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This is a realy great article.....I enjoy alot reading it......!!!!!

Thanks Jerome....!!!!
 

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On my recent lion hunt the property owner was using a 505 and it was a heavy beast. I didn't ask the maker . Would live to do an elephant hunt someday. Congrats on the trophies.
 

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a very fine article, I enjoyed reading it very much!

ive been taking a very hard look at the 505 Gibbs cartridge and have been dreaming of getting a custom rifle chambered in it. it appears these gentleman like to use very hot loads. a 600gr bullet at 2500fps is something to truly be feared by both the target and the shooter! if I ever get around to picking up a rifle chambered in this cartridge I think ill stick to the more traditional load of 600grs at 2100fps.

thanks
-matt
 

CAustin

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Matt this April I hunted a lioness in the Kalahari region of South Africa. The property owner was using a 505 Gibbs. I'm not sure what the brand was but it was a very heavy rifle. He indicated the the ammo was about $15 a round. Now if that's true it wouldn't be something one could really afford to shot very much. I asked him how often he shot the rifle and he said about once a year. Like you indicate the kick on one of those has to be big. Even the person who submitted the article said 10 to 15 rounds was all he could deal with in a day.
 

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Hunting Elephant with the .505 Gibbs
by Daniel McCarthy (2007)

Some years ago when I first became interested in elephant hunting, I made a serious mistake. As I looked at top quality big bore bolt action rifles suitable for elephant hunting, I found that they invariably cost more than US$10,000. Thinking that I could save some money by having rifles built by neighborhood gunsmiths instead of a top riflemaker, I abandoned the plan to purchase a top end gun in favor of having one assembled locally for about $2,000. Eight (8) lower-end custom bolt action rifles later, I have finally learned the error of my thinking. There simply is no way to match the feeding, feel, fit, quality, beauty and reliability of a top end bolt gun with a $2,000 budget.

From the first time I handled one, I have always admired the big bore rifles made by riflemaker Ryan Breeding (www.rbbigbores.com). Ryan offers rifles made to the customer's specifications, but he specializes in big bore dangerous game rifles that are stout, compact, short barreled and have a 5 shot capacity. Invariably I have found that his rifles are extremely well-balanced and have ultra-smooth actions. Ryan typically uses a new production Granite Mountain Arms double square bridge Mauser action as the basis for his big bore rifles. The GMA action is fitted with a Model 70 style safety, an Obendorf-style bolt handle, and has a custom magazine box made by Ryan to perfectly feed the cartridge for which the rifle is built.

During a recent hunt, I was fortunate enough to borrow a Ryan Breeding rifle in .505 Gibbs. Like most of Ryan's big bore rifles, this one was built on a double square bridge magnum Mauser action. The action has a 0.750" bolt body diameter which is ample to accommodate the large rim of the Gibbs cartridge. The action rails are also wide enough to accommodate the Gibbs cartridge without stacking the cartridges too narrowly which can create feeding issues. The magazine box and bottom metal which are custom made by Ryan result in a 5 shot .505 Gibbs rifle. When hunting dangerous game, there is some comfort to be had in have an extra shot or two in the rifle just in case. The stock is made from straight grained English walnut with lots of dark lines and a bit of feathering in the butt. The sights are hand made by Ryan, using an adjustable wide V for the rear and a folding hood front. The sights are very sturdy yet tasteful, making the sights on almost all other rifles look cheap and flimsy. The finished rifle weighs 11.5 pounds with no scope. One could be installed, but a scope is not desireable in such a large caliber. Offhand at 100 yards with iron sights, I could reliably hit a 6 inch bull, and Ryan can hit a steel pig offhand with the rifle out to 300 yards with the iron sights.

I took Ryan's .505 Gibbs on a cow elephant hunt Zimbabwe's bushvelt during September of 2006. The hunt was arranged by Roger Whittall (www.rwsafariss.com), and as I have always found with Roger's company, the hunting was excellent, all details were attended to, and everything went according to plan. Although in September the leaves were off the trees, visibility was limited due to thick jesse and close approaches to elephant were the norm. After some days of not turning up a tuskless elephant, we were fortunate to find a herd with three (3) mature tuskless cow elephant in it. The elephant were spread out and feeding, and as we flanked them for an approach, the wind swirled. One of the tuskless and two junior elephant caught our scent, parted from the herd and ran off. But at a distance of 60 yards, the tuskless turned and came for us. She ran up to a distance of 10 yards, stopped and looked at us from behind a bush. I held my fire as I had told my professional hunter, Peter Wood, that I wanted to shoot an elephant a bit closer than an elephant which I took at 7 yards the year before.

After watching us for a few moments from behind the bush, the tuskless cow turned and ran off to re-join the herd. Pete whispered "Let's go!" and we followed the tuskless quickly hoping to get a shot before she spooked the whole herd. However, this tuskless was not new to dealing with humans and instead of re-joining the herd, she was lying in wait for us behind some trees just 25 yards away. As she saw us approach, she charged with her head swinging slightly from side to side. There was no warning trumpet, just a silent rush. Pete and I shouldered our rifles and as the cow cleared a bush at 6 yards, I let her have a round in the forehead. Instantly she collapsed from the 600 grain Woodleigh FMJ bullet.

Knowing that the rest of the elephant herd was likely to run off at the sound of gunfire, Pete and I hustled over to where they were bunched beneath a tree, nervous and unsure whether to run immediately or not. We walked up and the matriarch cow came forward to meet us. One great thing about elephant hunting is that elephant will often come forward to face a challenge from a human, while buffalo usually just run off. Having just faced a full-on charge, I was a bit nervous and got ahead of myself with the matriarch, taking a frontal brain shot on her at 12 yards rather than letting her come as close as possible. My next shot took the third tuskless from the herd, and the rest of the elephants crashed off through the jesse, leaving us to ponder the downed elephant in the dust and the sun.

watermark.php

Matriarch cow Elephant at 12 yards just after a frontal brain shot. Note the dust kicked up from her forehead by the bullet.

watermark.php

Matriarch cow Elephant dropping as the rifle recoils.

watermark.php

Charging cow Elephant at 6 yards just after the shot but before she drops.

watermark.php

Charging cow Elephant at 6 yards dropped from a frontal brain shot.

Just four hours later, the safari company staff had all of the elephant skinned, cut up and loaded onto a wagon so that the meat could be distributed to locals. Not being one to miss lunch, however, I took the liberty of borrowing the PH's knife (since I am too lazy to carry one myself) and made some elephant shish kebob that I cooked over a fire and dined on while the safari company staff did the hard work of skinning the elephant and loading slabs of meat onto the wagon. Elephant is a course meat, but the shish kebob was excellent even in the 110 degree F. Zimbabwe sun.

watermark.php

The hard work of butchering Elephant begins.

Also on this hunt, we ran across an ancient and debilitated cow elephant. She was no longer with a herd, being in such poor health that she could not possibly keep up with them. Instead, she stayed in a patch of brush near a river. She was blind in one eye, very gaunt, and close to death. In a situation like that, a decision must be made whether to allow the animal to suffer and die on its own, to be eaten by scavengers, or whether to shoot the animal and recover it as food for the locals. After receiving approval to shoot the elephant, we moved in close in the jess and I shot her at 9 yards with the .505, again with a frontal brain shot.

The load that I used in the .505 Gibbs for all elephant shot this trip was 140.0 grains of H4831 powder behind a 600 grain Woodleigh FMJ bullet with a muzzle velocity of 2250 fps. In the Ryan Breeding rifle, that load generated 99 ft. pounds of recoil, compared to 16 ft. pounds of recoil for a standard 30-06. Nonetheless, the .505 Gibbs was relatively easy to control because the stock was designed with very little drop to minimize muzzle rise, and the butt is wide to spread recoil out over a large area. Due to the very slick action on this rifle, chambering a second round was as fast as I have ever experienced with any bolt action rifle. Nonetheless, I found that 10 to 15 shots per day was all that I cared to shoot as I lost concentration beyond that number. I recovered three of the Woodleigh 600 grain FMJ bullets from the dead elephant. They penetrated 53 to 55 inches after passing completely through the skull on frontal brain shots. Performance of rifle and ammo was excellent.

watermark.php

.505 Gibbs rifle on Granite Mountain Arms magnum Mauser action, built by Ryan Breeding (www.rbbigbores.com) and used for this elephant hunt.

The load I used was one of the lighter ones that Ryan uses in his rifle and was more than enough power for the task at hand. Some of the loads that the rifle liked are as follows:

Bullet Weight - Powder - Charge - Velocity
525 grains - H4831 - 135.0 - 2400 fps
600 grains - H4831 - 140.0 - 2250 fps
600 grains - IMR4350 - 136.0 - 2250 fps
600 grains - IMR4350 - 140.0 - 2500 fps

watermark.php

Woodleigh 600 grain FMJ .505 bullets. The one on the left is unfired, and the other three were recovered from elephant frontal brain shots after penetrating 53 to 55 inches.

For anyone interested in big bore rifles, the .505 Gibbs is a fantastic caliber with more power than most shooters can tolerate on a regular basis. And for a top end custom big bore rifle that is beautiful to look at, 100% reliable and a joy to use, I cannot recommend riflemaker Ryan Breeding highly enough.

watermark.php

.505 Gibbs rifle on Granite Mountain Arms magnum Mauser action, built by Ryan Breeding (www.rbbigbores.com) and used for this elephant hunt.

Peter Wood did a fantastic job of finding and stalking elephants on this safari, as he always does. Sadly, 2007 will be Peter's last year as a professional hunter, after which he will move to Montana to pursue a new way of life.

watermark.php

A charging cow Elephant that we did not have to shoot.

Roger Whittall has a reputation for providing top quality African safaris, and that reputation is very much deserved. Each of my safaris with his company have been in top quality game areas and have been successful in every way. I very much look forward to more safaris with Roger in the future.

Ryan Cox of Zimbabwe took the photos used for this article. Many thanks to Roger Whittall, Ryan Breeding, Peter Wood and Ryan Cox for making this a fantastic hunt.


Thank you. I had this load info but did not know where from. Now I am comfortable to try this load for my CZ 505 GIBBS.
 

Gert Odendaal

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Matt this April I hunted a lioness in the Kalahari region of South Africa. The property owner was using a 505 Gibbs. I'm not sure what the brand was but it was a very heavy rifle. He indicated the the ammo was about $15 a round. Now if that's true it wouldn't be something one could really afford to shot very much. I asked him how often he shot the rifle and he said about once a year. Like you indicate the kick on one of those has to be big. Even the person who submitted the article said 10 to 15 rounds was all he could deal with in a day.
Caustin, for sure the .458 WM is my own limit...have a look at a hunter who shot with Doc Kevin Robertson`s 505 Gibbs....
 

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Gert, that hurts just watching!:cry:
 

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Ridgewalker, I agree...:LOL::LOL::LOL::LOL: This is why I am setting my limit on .458 WM....there are calibers that just will be a punishment to me shooting them...(y)(y) This person in the video normally talks a lot , afterwards he was quite silent for the whole day on the Elephant course we attended...

An interesting fact:

When Richard Harland was 12 years of age he was the proud owner of a .450 NE Double rifle he got from a mentor /hunter in those years way, way back...

When Richard Harland was still a young man, he saw a 505 Gibbs owned by a farmer in Rhodesia those years back..very late in his career he had the fortune to buy that exact same 505 Gibbs many, many years later...Richard Harland did a lot of culling dangerous game since he was the ranger who`s job was to kill every animal that was a possible carrier of tsetse fly and it`s disease ...later years when I had the privilege to met him and his wife Brita he told me later in his life while culling invading elephants he rather resort to shooting over their heads to make them turn around and head to safer pastures...he also pointed out that a lot of the game species the department identify as probable carries of the tsetse flies was not carriers at all..Richard Harland is to me the greatest elephant hunter/culling officer ever..it is therefore safe to say he is the person who shot the most elephants and buffaloes in modern times ....Richard Harland is a great person, extremely humbled, always friendly and decent , few people like Richard Harland still exist...it really was a great privileged to have met him and Brita...wonderful people...although most of the elephants and buffalo Richard cull/hunt was done with his .458 Mannlicher Schoenauer...
 
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Caustin, for sure the .458 WM is my own limit...have a look at a hunter who shot with Doc Kevin Robertson`s 505 Gibbs....

"Big guns mean worst shooting"
MS

shooter's standing all wrong,even a .400 would have put him back like that.
Your upper body (not your feet) needs a tension and posture (not your feet) like in shotgun shooting or like a boxer just before punch
only my 2cents
Foxi
( ca. 150 rounds up .458 per year )
 
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Gert Odendaal

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shooter's standing all wrong,even a .400 would have put him back like that.
Your upper body (not your feet) needs a tension and posture like in shotgun shooting or like a boxer just before punch
only my 2cents
Foxi
( ca. 150 rounds .458 per year )
Foxi, I know and agree but I would have not tell the shooter that...somethings in life you need to learn through "real life " experience ...especially if the largest caliber you usually shoot is a .375 H&H Magnum,,,:LOL::LOL::LOL::LOL::LOL::LOL: Quite a large gap in caliber from a .375 H&H Magnum to a fully loaded .505 Gibbs, since Doc Kevin load his 505 Gibbs to dangerous game stopping power to safeguard his students in the veld..when taking them for practical courses...
 

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Foxi, I know and agree but I would have not tell the shooter that...somethings in life you need to learn through "real life " experience ...especially if the largest caliber you usually shoot is a .375 H&H Magnum,,,:LOL::LOL::LOL::LOL::LOL::LOL:

yes, the .375 is only a mid-range caliber in the upper range.
For me, the big African calibers start at .450

Do you get all from Belgium ?
 
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Foxi

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"Eight (8) lower-end custom bolt action rifles later, I have finally learned the error of my thinking"
:sleep::sleep::sleep::sleep:
Almost as good as 5 times married and still unhappy.
 

Gert Odendaal

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"Eight (8) lower-end custom bolt action rifles later, I have finally learned the error of my thinking"
:sleep::sleep::sleep::sleep:
Almost as good as 5 times married and still unhappy.
There is a good reason why companies like Rigby, Holland /Holland , Westley Richards...exist...there are only two types of Dangerous Game rifles...a real professional build rifle from these companies or a working rifle from any other individuals .....the latter one being my choice since I get what I pay for and I can do bundu bashing with it..it will still kill the buffalo that assault me...the real Custom made rifles from these companies is beautiful to look at, they are great hunting rifles but I would not take such a rifle to Africa at all...(y):LOL:
 

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That's why I love my 500 Jeff it really puts them down with authority when the chips are down.....500's are not for all but if you can handle them there is no finer caliber for DG especially elephant when it gets dangerous.....
 

IvW

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Caustin, for sure the .458 WM is my own limit...have a look at a hunter who shot with Doc Kevin Robertson`s 505 Gibbs....

Clearly loading the cartridge wrong for a CRF action, luckily no damage to extractor...

Yip you will learn quickly to handle the rifle correctly when shooting the super bores....
 

Gert Odendaal

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That's why I love my 500 Jeff it really puts them down with authority when the chips are down.....500's are not for all but if you can handle them there is no finer caliber for DG especially elephant when it gets dangerous.....
That is why I love my 404 Jeffery so much..it puts any plains game I hunt down with authority as well and does not cause injury to my ego or shoulder...the .50 calibers are just too much rifle for me...(y)(y):LOL:
 

Major Khan

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Very impressive ! Those 600 grain solid metal covered bullets which were recovered from the corpses of the tuskless cow elephants... have experienced NO distortion , whatsoever .
 

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Rare Breed wrote on USMA84DAB's profile.
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elkhunter77 wrote on Mark Biggerstaff's profile.
Yes, I am interested in some A Frames to load, if they are the 300 grain or other that will work for Cape Buff. I need enough to work up a load and sight in, then carry over there
KKovar wrote on AfricaHunting.com's profile.
Wow, great response regarding the title of a thread and an amazing site.
Jerycmeach wrote on Bullet Safaris's profile.
I am interested in hearing about your wild lion hunts.
Daniel Cary wrote on Thomas Rutledge's profile.
Greetings Mr. Rutledge. My apologies for the latent reply, cell/email prohibited during working hours, apx 72 a week, yikes! I just wanted to thank you for keeping me in mind for possible 577 loads. I actually purchased a few rounds, however, the firearm is still on the fence at this point.
Many Thanks, again. Regards, Dan.
 
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