Yukon Hunting Outfitters

Discussion in 'Hunting USA & Canada' started by LivingTheDream, Jan 3, 2016.

  1. JES Adventures

    JES Adventures AH Fanatic

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2015
    Messages:
    540
    Video/Photo:
    89
    Likes Received:
    1,049
    Location:
    Texas
    Member of:
    Life Member of DSC, NRA and SCI
    Hunted:
    Botswana, Cameroon, CAR, Ethiopia, Namibia, RSA, Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe and Zambia. US, Canada, Arctic, Mexico, Argentina, Spain, Portugal, U.K., Romania, Tadjikistan, Nepal, China, Australia and New Zealand
    Thanks Dave it was a great hunt, but tough to say the least but well worth it. All backpacking, took the ram on the 6th day.
     

  2. JTG

    JTG New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2016
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    That´s impressive to me, so sad you had that experience. I went with Chris last year and everything went fine, my partner and I got a ram each, he´s was a great 38" and mine a nice 33". After a few days of my hunt, I got it the 2nd hunting day, I realized that with some patience I could had something bigger, but that was great for me anyway. Chris was my guide as well and did all the stalks along with me, he worked out the ram after the shoot and he did all the carry back to spike camp.

    Food, service, horses, riffle rental, rest of guides was all great.

    I guess he can offer you something attractive for a second try.

    Good luck!
     

  3. Hank2211

    Hank2211 AH ENABLER GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    2,579
    Video/Photo:
    128
    Likes Received:
    5,165
    Member of:
    SCI, DU, Pheasants Forever
    Hunted:
    Canada, United States, Zimbabwe, South Africa (Eastern Cape; Northern Cape; North West Province, Natal, Mpumalanga, Limpopo), Namibia, Cameroon, Benin, Ethiopia, Argentina
    Ruger Fan, this is great information! Thanks very much for posting.
     

  4. GrantH

    GrantH New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2016
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    2

    I heard about this post concerning Chris Widrig, Widrig Outfitters. I felt that a rebuttal was warranted. I hunted with Widrig Outfitters in 2014. My experience was totally different than Diamond Dave describes. I wasn't on DD's hunt, but I can speak to my hunt and the total dedication and effort Widrig made to make my hunt successful.

    1. Our days were anything but 8-5. By 8:00, Chris would have wrangled horses, packed camp, saddled horses, packed the pack horses, ate breakfast and be an hour down the trail. DD seems to support this same time table. He said Widrig was packing the horses at 7:00. Our day on the trail would end between 6:00 to 7:00 pm. Then, we had a couples hours to do horses, make a camp, eat and make for bed.

    2. I have a hard time understanding DD's complaint about food. While at base camp, Goz Lake, the food was unbelievable; wild blueberry pancakes, wild cranberry sweet rolls, great meals. More than a man ought to eat. On the trail, we had great "camping meals." Trail food isn't going to be 5-star, but real food was far and away better than Mountain Home. From fried eggs and steak to salad and desserts, we had them all. We too had caribou. It made a great basis to a meal. Again, way better than Mountain Home. What are you going to eat on a 10-day hunt caribou or canned Vienna sausage or tuna fish?

    3. DD complains about a lack of sheep. Anyone that has hunted much, and he claims 17 sheep/goat hunts, knows that you can spend numerous days without seeing game. However, DD describes seeing five bands of sheep in "8 days of hunting." That doesn't seem that bad to me. Here in Utah where I've hunted deer and elk for 48 years I be elated to see trophy animals five times in eight days. I saw a lot of sheep; at least it seemed like a lot to me. (About 80 ewes and lambs, 12 or so immature rams and 11 legal rams.

    4. DD also complains about not seeing caribou. My experience in Widrig's area had sheep and caribou in different places. I made the choice to harvest a sheep before I worried about sheep. Did DD really want to spend his hunting days looking for caribou rather than caribou? During my hunt, I saw one caribou along a valley trail while hunting sheep. After harvesting a ram, we turned attention to caribou and then I saw many caribou.

    5. DD attacks Widrig's character. He accuses him of being lazy, too old and an inept guide unwilling to work for his hunter. That is so far from the truth it makes me angry. Internet character assassination is way too easy. None of us were on the hunt with DD and Widrig, but I can draw from my experience and to those of other hunters I communicated with when I was looking for a guide. DD even points out that Widrig helped a hunter harvest a ram the last hour the last day. Chris made camp, wrangled horses, climbed mountains, skinned my ram, fleshed the hide, carried a 125-pound pack, sat under a ledge with me waiting for wind, rain and fog to subside. That doesn't describe a guide that is lazy and uninterested. I tried to help some. I unsaddled horses, cooked a bit, fetched water. It doesn't sound like DD did much to help; probably just sat and waited to be tended.

    6. Those of you that have hunted the McKenzie Mountains, are probably wondering where that grassy knoll near camp is. Man I never saw any. I saw steep mountains, boulders, wind, rain, snow ans scree.

    DD points out that not every hunter harvested a ram; probably true. That's hunting. I returned from elk hunts in Idaho and Wyomimg empty handed. Antelope hunts in Utah and Wyoming; no antelope. I've hunted within 10 minutes of my house where I know every facet of the land without harvesting a deer, elk, coyote, pheasant or even a stupid rabbit. That's hunting. I guarantee you that very few places have 80% harvest rate and that includes hunters that pass on shooting opportunities or out-and-out miss the shot. In 2014, 12 of 13 hunters harvested rams. The one hunter that didn't harvest passed on three 37-inch rams waiting for a 40-incher.

    7. I'm sorry DD didn't get a ram. I'm sure that would disappointing. But at the same time, I think he is missing the complete picture. A hunt in the Yukon is far more than meat and a head on the wall. It's floats on a lake near the Arctic Circle, it's black spruce and alder, it's grizzly scat on the trail, it's a sow and cubs in a willow patch, it's starting a fire in a rain storm, it's fording rivers, it's a wolf, it's a weathered moose antler, it's picking and eating wild berries, it's walking where no man has walked before, it's northern lights, it's sheep ribs smoked over the camp fire, it's strangers who become comrades. It's a shame that DD went home "totally empty handed." He missed out on far more than a sheep

    Don't be mislead by DD's post. It doesn't give an accurate depiction of the type of guide, outfitter and person Chris Widrig is. If I get to hunt sheep or moose in the future, I won't shop around. I'll be in the Yukon with Chris and his crew.

    Grant Hansen
     
    LivingTheDream and 375 Ruger Fan like this.

  5. Hubertus Gerling Germany

    Hubertus Gerling Germany New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2016
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1
    After a very successful moose and caribou hunt in 2013 I have hunted in July-August this year with Widrig-Outfitters for Dall sheep. I was guided by Chris Widrig himself. Beforehand I was looking forward to long rides and a exhausting mountain hunting in the Yukon. My expectations were far exceeded. In the beautiful countryside I could observe Dall sheep, caribous and grizzlys. Long rides led me to the far corners of the hunting ground. Chris Widrig guided me on some difficult climbs. He showed me several sheep and lambs. Legal rams were initially seen only in far distance, too far to hunt them. On the last day we could spot a ram quite high in a rough terrain. Chris has the demanding climb dared me and I took a beautiful 39” ram. Due to some painful blisters I was not loadable and Chris had a hard work to transport luggage and me down the mountain and back to the camp. He has done a very great job. At the end, each of the 4 hunters has harvested a ram.
     
    LivingTheDream likes this.

  6. Christopher C Epping

    Christopher C Epping New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2016
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Member of:
    NRA
    I would like to comment on my experience with Chris Widrig. I hunted with Chris on my first sheep hunt in August 2015. I was 60 years old at the time, in above average condition and had prepared for almost two months for this hunt. As all sheep hunters know, as I found out, that hunting sheep is no easy endeavor. I entrusted Chris to use his years of experience to get me through. First thing was to reduce my gear to a manageable level. Food and supplies are more essential than a few unnecessary pieces of gear. Trust me...I had enough gear. The remainder was stored at the Goz Lake base camp. So I just went with the flow.
    The first day was about 7 hours on horseback and the second day about 8 hours to reach our spike camp. This area had not been hunted in about 7 years. From there we spent 4 days climbing and glassing the various mountain sides that Chris had spotted sheep, in previous outings. Each day was a grind....for me. My 60 year old body took a beating. But I was there to get a ram. No quitting. After 4 days without success, we deceided to move camp. We took the horses about 4 hours to another spike camp that had not been used for several years.
    Leaving early that next morning we had a plan to scope out a ridge that had been successful for other hunters in the past. About an hour out of camp, my one-eyed guide, losing the other to a bear, spotted 2 sheep behind us and over a mile away. They were difficult to spot through the fog even with the spotting scope. How he even spotted them was incredible. We then deceided to get a better look.
    After almost 4 hours of climbing over rock slides and caribou moss we reached a game trail on top in an attempt to stay above the sheep and to verify if there was even a shooter. Another hour of hiking put us in position but no rams......suddenly below us and to our left we saw ONE! We deceided to go along the ridge a bit furthur so as to position ourselves to shoot if he was a shooter. It was a perfect stalk. We set up quickly and waited. The wind was perfect. After about 15 minutes we saw a ram. It was a good looking ram. But Chris knew that there were at least 2 so we waited so that we could get a look at the other ram and decide which one was better. His patience paid off. Within 5 minutes, out came a second ram. Chris said to get ready, which I was. And after just a few seconds we determined that the first ram was the better of the two.
    I took my shot, the ram went down and I had my first Yukon ram. Chris did exactly as I had hoped. He guided me. And through his experience, he put me in a position to succeed. And we did.
    It was getting late in the afternoon but being August, we had plenty of light. So we took our pictures and field dressed the ram and packed up to head back down to our spike camp. Chris took 3/4 of the load and I took the rest. His ability to navigate the terrain and get us safely off the mountain was impressive. Just as we reached the bottom, a thunder, lightning and rain storm hit. Our last hour of hiking was a wet and miserable experience. I was dead tired and on my last ounce of energy. But I had my ram. And Chris still had to find the horses that were spooked by the storm. He did!
    After settling in and drying out a little bit we took a longer examination of my ram. An initial measurement revealed it was a 40 inch, 9 year old ram.....holy crap, not bad for a first time sheep hunt. It was definitely hard earned.
    In conclusion, I found Chris to be extremely knowledgeable and willing to go wherever and through whatever, to see that his client "guest" had the best opportunity to succeed. I've hunted many other animals in North America with many guides. Some younger, some older. I can't always keep up with the younger, so I'll take experience any day.
    Chris Widrig is a professional.. His outfit is professional, the horses are excellent and it was an experience of a lifetime. I would recommend him and his organization to those that are willing to put in the hard work. Happy Hunting!!
     

    Attached Files:


  7. dbrown

    dbrown New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2016
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would also like to reply to DD's review of Chris Widrig. I was the hunter that preceded DD's hunt and my guide was Chris. I have been away from the net for a few days and when I read this review I was dumbfounded. It was as if between my hunt and DD's someone had taken Chris's place. We started at 4:30 every morning with breakfast and gathering horses and road out to hunt and returned at around 5:eek:o in the evening. We climbed every day and glassed. When I was unable to continue Chris would place me in a good glassing area and continue on to search more area for a ram. This went on for 8 days. We covered many miles and climbed numerous mountains. We saw between 40 and 45 ewes and lambs and 8 rams. I did not kill a ram but it certainly was not for lack of effort on Chris's or my part. Anyone who has hunted sheep knows the challenge that they have in front of them. The food, equipment, and services have been spoken to in the above posts and all were very good. Chris is a professional in every form. I am returning in 2018 with Chris as my guide, we have some unfinished business to attend to. I am 65 years old so DD and I are about the same age and I would not spend the money, or go through the effort to stay in shape unless I had the confidence in Chris to get it done
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 18, 2016

  8. oneeyedsheepguide

    oneeyedsheepguide New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2016
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    7
    I was the guide and outfitter of DiamondDaves hunt. There are a lot of untruths in his post and I feel the need to respond. This is the first negative review that I have ever had regarding my personal guiding ability, 42 years in the field and 137 successful sheep hunts. Yes, I do indeed have one eye, mauled by a grizzly in 1999, but I still guide some of the largest rams taken in my area each fall.
    Here is a summary of how the hunt went;

    August 21st- DD flew into base camp with three other hunters, arriving at 10.45 AM. This is not a hunting day. It's a travel day (our hunts are ten days in the field plus two travel days from Whitehorse). If DD had paid attention to his pre hunt literature he would have realized this. All the other hunters in camp realized it was a travel day.

    August 22nd- When assigning hunters & guides I picked DD as he was the most experienced hunter, had already taken a number of dall sheep and was looking to upgrade his trophy quality (I normally put experienced hunters with experienced guides). DD & I rode 7 1/2 hours to our White Mountains spike camp. This is my favorite camp, with heavy based rams living in rugged limestone mountains. I had not hunted here for several seasons. I told DD that we would not likely see sheep until reaching the spike camp area, as it was mostly caribou country.

    August 23rd- I was up at 4 AM, wrangled our five horses, cooked breakfast, collected firewood, fetched water, did dishes, and saddled the horses (DD did almost nothing the entire hunt....just sat in the high tech camp chair that I brought for him). We rode out to hunt about 6.20 AM. Saw three rams that day. One was a 34"-35" full curl we nicknamed "gimpy" because he walked with a limp. The rams were all very high and not in stalk able positions. DD was in poor physical condition for a sheep hunt. He was about 50 pounds overweight, sweating heavily and breathing hard on all of our walks/climbs. I adjusted my guiding pace and climbing expectations accordingly (we are both 60 years old. I am 5 ft 11", 164 pounds and he is 5 ft 10" 245 pounds). Seeing no stalk able rams we were back at spike camp at 5 PM. I then unsaddled the horses, hobbled them, collected more firewood, fetched water from the creek, cooked supper, did the dishes, and glassed around for sheep. DD sits in his camp chair and talks politics. Mostly about how great America will be with Donald Trump and how his black African, Eskimo and Indian guides from previous hunts were racially inferior. I headed for my tent & book about 8 pm. This pattern would continue the whole hunt.

    August 24th- I was up at 4.30 AM, just when it is getting daylight. Wrangled and did the same work routine each day. We rode out at about 6.45. Circled the mountain range near camp, a 12 mile ride. We spot one half curl ram and a beautiful grizzly. Back at spike around 5 pm. Beautiful warm day.

    August 25th- Up at 4.30 AM and off with horses at 7.15. Tough horse wrangle today as they decided to climb high for better grass. Rode about 4 miles and then hiked up a long drainage where I had taken rams in the past. Saw two groups of ewes & lambs, 12 total. Started raining at 3 pm and visibility was poor. Back at camp by 5.50 pm.

    August 26th- Up at 4.30 am and off with horses by 7 am. Decide to head back to the basin where we saw "gimpy". We spot a 3/4 curl ram at the entrance of the draw. Further up in the basin I spot two full curl rams laying down. They were bedded in an exposed spot, but would have been stalk able if the wind was the right direction (it was blowing on our backs up into the basin). We watched these rams all day. One was "gimpy" and the other was a very nice ram about 37 1/2" with good bases. He held his weight well and appeared slightly broomed. At 4 PM the rams moved up to the top of the mountain and bedded. There was absolutely no chance for a stalk in that position. DD & I made a mutual decision to head back to spike camp and try these rams from the other side of the range the next morning. On the way back to the horses we see two other rams crossing the valley in front of us. One was a decent 35" full curl which came within 75 yards of us (DD took some great pictures). We had no interest in shooting this ram with a much bigger one nearby.

    August 27th- Up at 4 am and excited to try and locate the ram from the day before. Before breakfast I spot a full curl ram up the valley. We leave about 6.45 full of optimism. By early afternoon we see a total of 4 rams spread out across the slopes. One is "gimpy" and he is not with the good ram we had seen the day before. But, there are two other full curl rams high up in the limestone cliffs. One about 36" and the other 37" to 38" with a very nice flare. This is the ram DD said was the "biggest ram I have ever seen". The big one climbed to the top of the mountain near mid day and bedded down. I decided to make a stalk that would put us about 700 yards below the ram. From there I had hoped he would come down lower to feed in the evening. It took us two hours to do this routine climb. I was worried about DD as he was breathing heavily and sweating profusely (heart attack candidate I thought to myself). As we neared the area I had anticipated watching the big ram, another full curl came out above us less than 200 yards away. At this point DD decided to do his own thing and move to the right instead of following me higher to get a better angle on the sheep. I signaled for him to follow me, to no avail (my guess is he was gassed and did not want to climb any higher). The ram soon spotted DD, spooked and ran off to the left. He appeared to be about 36" and we would not have shot him as we were fixated on the big one bedded higher up. Problem was, the smaller ram ran up the mountain and joined the big ram. Both were then on high alert and there was no chance they would come back down toward us that day. DD wanted to try a 650 yard shot on the big ram, now on top of an extremely rugged ridge. The shot was just too far and I was not sure I could even retrieve him if he was hit. So I refused to let him shoot. We headed back to spike around 7 pm, both apparently in agreement to try the backside of the range the next day.

    August 28th- Up at 4.30 and out at 7.30. Back to the basin that we saw "gimpy on the 23rd. Even before tying up the horses I saw two full curl rams lying down at the far end of the basin. One was the 37 1/2" ram seen on the 26th and the other was a new full curl, slightly smaller. Again, the rams were bedded up high in a very exposed location. A bigger problem was the strong north wind, blowing on our backs right up the valley. We watched these rams for about 7 hours. There was absolutely no chance for a successful stalk in that location with the wind blowing toward them. Headed back to spike camp around 4 pm. My hope was that these rams would be in a better position in the morning and that the wind might change.

    August 29th- Up at 4.40. Losing daylight fast and it is not light now until after 5 am. Went back to the basin where we were the previous day. Hunted the whole basin and saw no rams. Then decided to ride around the range and glass the other side for a few hours. No rams. Back at spike camp around 6 pm.

    August 30th- Up at 4.30 pm and out of camp by 7.20am. We again rode completely around the range where we had been seeing the rams, 12 miles and eight hours of glassing. Glassed every nook & cranny but saw no sheep. Both of us were very disappointed. Back at spike camp at 5 pm

    August 31st- Up at 4.30 once again. I packed up the whole camp, saddles the horses and prepared for the ride back to base. The charter aircraft taking the hunters back to Whitehorse was scheduled to leave very early the next morning. Everything was packed on the horses by 9.30 am. DD then spots a lone ram about three miles up the valley on the same ridge where he blew the stalk on August 27th. I quickly did a mental time calculation....1/2 hour to unpack & secure the horses, 1 hour ride up the valley, 3 hours for a stalk, 2 1/2 hours to skin the ram and carry the whole thing back to the horses myself (DD would be no help with this), 1 hour ride back to spike camp, 1 hour to repack the horses with the ram, and then a 7 1/2 hour ride back to base camp. So 16.5 hours to make an attempt on this ram. That would put us back at base camp about 2 am, after negotiating two mountain passes in the dark. Considering time constraints and safety concerns about traveling after dark, I decided that going after this ram was not an option. We did see ten ewes & lambs on the trail back to base camp that afternoon.

    September 1st- DD flew back to Whitehorse. This is a traveling day, same as August 21st.

    In conclusion, we saw 11 rams and 22 ewes on this hunt. Five rams were full curl, with the two best in the 37" to 38" class. We were just not able to get on these rams. Sheep hunting is not always easy (like DD's last helicopter dall hunt where he shot a ram from his tent). Luck can play a part. I personally worked this hunt to the best of my ability and am proud of my effort. DD is a very narcissistic man who doesn't take failure easily. This should not be an excuse for slandering my reputation as a sheep guide. Hopefully forum members can read through both versions of the hunt and come to their own conclusions. Thanks for listening.



     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 18, 2016
    K-man, kgesch, wahunter and 4 others like this.

  9. Kylek

    Kylek New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2016
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    3
    Hey guys,

    Sorry for the long post but I hunted with Widrig Outfitters in August 2016 and am The Hunter that Diamond Dave refers to in his review. For the life of me I am not sure how I got dragged into his review of Widrig Outfitters but thought I should try to set the record straight and will only comment on things that I personally observed or of which I have first-hand knowledge.

    First of all, I would like to respond to Dave’s assessment of me. I am 51, not 45 as Dave described me (I guess his audition for the “Fool the Guesser” spot at the carnival is blown). I am neither overweight nor out of shape, although I am flattered that Dave took the time to asses my physique. I did have more gear than other hunters in camp BECAUSE I also brought archery equipment (at Chris’ suggestion) to attempt to kill a caribou with bow and arrow. Besides the archery gear, my equipment list was exactly what Chris suggested in his communication with me, no more and no less. I am probably bigger than most sheep hunters at 6’ 225 pounds however I am relatively sure most sheep hunters did not attend college on a football scholarship as a defensive lineman and am lighter now than I was 30 years ago. This was my first sheep hunt (and only one, if my wife has her way, but that is a different story) although far from my first guided hunt and I feel I have the experience to assess a good guiding outfit. Sheep hunting is something I dreamed of since childhood and there was no way I was going to allow physical conditioning to get in the way of my success. To this end, I trained very hard for a year prior to this hunt and this is something I am actually quite proud of, however I did down play this when speaking with other guides or hunters in camp in an attempt to be humble (Yes Dave, humble is a word, try looking it up). I was running 8 minute miles on trail runs on some very challenging terrain in northern Michigan prior to the hunt and training 5-7 days/week. Three weeks prior to the hunt my right knee, which had been reconstructed following a football injury 30 years ago, developed limited range of motion and severe swelling, which required drainage and a steroid injection. Chris Widrig learned of this when he asked if I was ready to go and I made the comment that the only concern I had was the horseback ride, as several references had told me that they experienced knee pain after riding. That was the extent of my complaint. Chris then came to my cabin and suggested that I switch from him to Ryan as my guide. I argued with him and told him I did not tell him about the knee problem looking for special treatment. Chris replied that I had paid him, in part, for his guidance and he was telling me that I should switch guides. Pretty hard to argue with that logic so off I went with Ryan. I literally prayed on my way back to base camp that Dave would shoot a sheep with Chris, because I had a feeling he would have ill feelings toward me, through no fault of mine or anyone else.

    As far as direct knowledge of effort on Dave’s hunt, I know that they were the first to leave base camp and the last to return. I also know that there was a bear hunter in camp that definitely logged more saddle time than anyone else in camp (he was successful too on a beautiful 7+’ mountain grizzly) although he may not have been as many miles from base camp. My point is, Dave wasn’t the only one putting hours in the saddle trying to get to areas that have the game he was seeking.

    I do know that Dave lived in Costa Rica for several years due to the current political administration and that he could not believe how long it took for the Costa Rican government to allow him to spend $1 million cash to purchase a marina. You may say, “How do you know this”? Well, Dave told me, which I thought was a bit of an odd story to be telling someone you had just meant. I also got to hear about Dave’s participation in a Kuiu video (By the way, my gear was Kuiu and I highly recommend it for a mountain hunt) “Nahanni Butte-The Last Hunt” 3 separate times and how the owner of Kuiu personally gave him a pair of gaiters. He suggested I watch it and I did. Did not see Dave in a single frame. He spoke of several other hunts, both in North America and Africa and I do believe he has extensive experience and is not afraid to tell you about it. The name DiamondDave probably says more about his personality than anything else.

    In regard to Chris Widrig, he is an honest man that runs a very organized camp. I do believe that others have stated quite well (such as Dbrown, Chris Epping, and Hubertus Gerling) what to expect in camp and the effort Chris will put forth to make sure all of his hunters have a positive experience. In the end, it is hunting, and some things are just beyond anyone’s control, especially in a remote camp such as the one Widrig Outfitters provides. The guides were all very experienced and the food was excellent in base camp and very good in spike camp. The horses were gentle and made hunting in that terrain possible. There is plenty of game and the views are spectacular. A hunt in this environment is not for everyone, it is expensive and time consuming, especially when there is no guarantee of success. Sheep hunting by its very nature is one of the most difficult mountain hunts you can do but if it means anything, I will be back hunting with Widrig Outfitters in 2018, climbing those mountains and taking my chances at a true adventure. In conclusion, do your own research, talk to every reference provided and weigh all of the information before deciding on which outfitter to choose. That is how I chose Widrig Outfitters the first time and am very pleased with the outcome.
     
    Ardent, 375 Ruger Fan and kgesch like this.

  10. Ardent

    Ardent AH Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2010
    Messages:
    278
    Video/Photo:
    20
    Likes Received:
    209
    Hunted:
    Canada (British Columbia, Alberta), Mexico, Zimbabwe, South Africa (Limpopo, North Cape), USA
    Take a good look just across the border into BC, Kawdy Outfitters. Colin is one of my best friends' brother and he's the real deal, guides Steve Hornady etc. He's in his mid 30's and lives and breathes the industry, a director in our BC / Yukon outfitter's association. In other words he has too much on the line not to do things perfectly. Worth taking a look at to do a proper compare, his territory is spectacular and enormous as well.
     

  11. Ardent

    Ardent AH Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2010
    Messages:
    278
    Video/Photo:
    20
    Likes Received:
    209
    Hunted:
    Canada (British Columbia, Alberta), Mexico, Zimbabwe, South Africa (Limpopo, North Cape), USA
    oneeyedsheepguide, without taking a side as I know none of the involved, I will say as an outfitter and guide in BC very much like yourself there is an awful lot the client never realizes is happening and being decided upon. Constant cutoffs have to be set by the guide to first and foremost keep things safe, every hunt I set no return points of "If this happens, this HAS to happen by X time." You've been doing this longer than me, and just about any of us and understand that more than most. The client hopefully sees it all as rather simple decisions they may not understand and when successful it's all forgotten. When there's a situation like this further explanation is required and often there's a lot to the story never realized. I've only had one truly challenging client and consider myself lucky, I'll meet more no doubt. Not linking that to DiamondDave I know neither of you, but I can empathize with the challenges faced by the outfitter in the mountains in remote parts the client never is fully acquainted with. Sorry to both of you as this is a sad thing to see on the internet.
     

  12. revturbo9967

    revturbo9967 AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2014
    Messages:
    138
    Video/Photo:
    3
    Likes Received:
    86
    Hunted:
    USA- IL, WY, CO, NH, ME, CT Canada- NB
    old as heck but an awful lot of new members dropping in to give reviews on the outfitter...
     

  13. Foxi

    Foxi AH Elite

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2012
    Messages:
    1,148
    Video/Photo:
    94
    Likes Received:
    1,697
    Location:
    Germany
    Hunted:
    Canada, USA,Austria,Turkey,Tschech Rep.,Poland,Hungary,Serbia,Denmark,Namibia and England(England is wonderful) Romania,Luangwa-,Gwayi- + Save River.Horseback-tours in South Africa and Botswana.
    Schafe im Yukon.JPG
    sheeps are magic.
    Here a friend of mine @Kluane lake NP
     

  14. johnnyblues

    johnnyblues AH ENABLER AH Ambassador

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2013
    Messages:
    6,187
    Video/Photo:
    135
    Likes Received:
    5,793
    Location:
    Georgia
    Hunted:
    USA, ALASKA Canada, New Zealand, Mexico Africa.
    Mike I did this hunt many years ago in Alaska on the Alaska range for Dall sheep. Whom ever you choose you be in much better shape than you think you are. Sheep hunting is absolutely magical on many levels. But can also be mentally challenging. Best of luck my friend! Look forward to seeing your smiling face with a big sheep!
     
    Foxi likes this.

  15. LivingTheDream

    LivingTheDream AH Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2015
    Messages:
    2,000
    Video/Photo:
    13
    Likes Received:
    2,524
    @johnnyblues did this hunt last year. Busted my @ss walking with 60lbs in my pack all summer. I just got this back from the taxidermist. Sheep are definitely magical! I can't wait to do it all again.

    IMG_20180714_112323067.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 7, 2018
    6.8KLR and 375 Ruger Fan like this.

  16. johnnyblues

    johnnyblues AH ENABLER AH Ambassador

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2013
    Messages:
    6,187
    Video/Photo:
    135
    Likes Received:
    5,793
    Location:
    Georgia
    Hunted:
    USA, ALASKA Canada, New Zealand, Mexico Africa.
    Stunning mike! How big was he?Who did the work?
     

  17. DiamondDave

    DiamondDave New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2016
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    2
    Well, it's been a long time but just happen to run across this thread again just now while researching another outfitter and thought I'd jump back in. It looks like Chris contacted all his references and ask them to jump in here on me and that is fine. I'll just say a couple of things to try and set the record straight as I stated previously:

    1. Chris is a great guy and I really liked him and enjoyed my time spent with him.
    2. Chris runs a great organization than is fine tuned and runs like a top.
    3. Chris has outstanding horses and a beautiful area which I very much enjoyed the time I spent there.

    A couple of things I want to point out:

    1. I am NOT 50 lbs overweight and stay well prepared for sheep hunting (as best as anyone living at 600 msl can do) as I do at least 1 sheep hunt each fall and now on my 21st sheep hunt. Here is a photo that Chris took himself of me one day. Do I look 50 lbs overweight? I don't think I was "sweating like I was going to have a heart attack" as Chris stated. I'm sure he will beat me to the top of the mountain just the same as any guide/outfitter on their 3rd hunt of the year and 30 some years of doing it but there is no way I was holding up the hunt. We did several hikes up the mountain and there was no problem on my part getting there.

    14231339_1178824415524742_1744345128328224923_o.jpg

    2. We did see some sheep as Chris says once we got over to the one are we were going to. I simply stated that in a 7 hours horseback ride, we only saw 1 ptarmigan and 1 small caribou. Chris himself will tell you that "due to the cold winters" (as he told me), the numbers of animals were very low.
    3. I would disagree with some of the statements about the hunting times that Chris stated. There was no getting up at 4:30 any morning and the very first morning his talk with me was that "we aren't going to bust our ass and there is no need to go out early and come in late. We will plan on leaving around 8 and coming back to spike camp around 5"....which in most days was the case.
    4. I disagree with what he says about the sheep stalk....NEVER was I not doing what he wanted or unable to go. I was watching a big ram on the top ridge all morning while Chris was gone somewhere.....sleeping in the willows. Hours later he returned and I had to really urge him to make the stalk. That is a total lie or lack of memory for him to state that I couldn't get to a ram......he disappeared in the rocks.....and we never saw him again until he popped back up where we could not get to. Then I had the big ram at 425 yards, dead rest and he wouldn't let me shoot. Whatever! I'm not going to argue. I'm just stating what happened. There were only 2 of us there so just our words to consider.

    There is no doubt that Chris has been around a long time and no doubt there have been many great hunts. I even wrote Chris after the hunt when he sent a standard review form and commented on how the other guides and hunters that were there at the time I was......stayed out as long as it took to get the sheep.....one even slept on the mountain which I have done a couple of times when thats what it took.

    I have supported FNAWS, WILD SHEEP, GSCO, etc and purchased this hunt through the Wild Sheep chapter. I don't know if that made a difference or not but for whatever reason......the facts that I stated during my hunt were absolutely true. I do NOT feel that I was the norm and I don't know why Chris did the things he did.

    Again, Chris is a nice guy and runs a top notch outfit.....I just stated THE TRUTH on my experience for whatever it's worth. Your mileage may vary.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 26, 2018

Share This Page

 
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice