Scientists Call For Halt To Elephant Hunting Along Kenya-Tanzania Border

Hoas

AH fanatic
Joined
Nov 11, 2014
Messages
958
Reaction score
2,556
Media
603
Articles
281

A group of international scientists said Thursday that the hunting of elephants along the Kenya-Tanzania border for their tusks should be stopped to save the giant land mammals from extinction.

In a letter published by Science, an international journal, 24 biologists, zoologists, and conservationists warned against trophy hunting of elephants along the Amboseli ecosystem that spans the Kenya-Tanzania border amid threat to tourism and the livelihoods of local communities.

According to scientists, five male adult elephants with tusks weighing more than 45 kg were shot by trophy hunters in Tanzania in late 2023 and early 2024, posing a new threat to the survival of the iconic giant herbivore.
A group of international scientists said Thursday that the hunting of elephants along the Kenya-Tanzania border for their tusks should be stopped to save the giant land mammals from extinction.

In a letter published by Science, an international journal, 24 biologists, zoologists, and conservationists warned against trophy hunting of elephants along the Amboseli ecosystem that spans the Kenya-Tanzania border amid threat to tourism and the livelihoods of local communities.

According to scientists, five male adult elephants with tusks weighing more than 45 kg were shot by trophy hunters in Tanzania in late 2023 and early 2024, posing a new threat to the survival of the iconic giant herbivore.
These elephants, according to wildlife biologists, were among the most magnificent species of the cross-border population studied for 51 years by the Amboseli Elephant Research Project (AERP) in Kenya.

Continue..

6.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Activists they mean. It it a sign that the population has recovered and that there a older elephants with bigger tusks nowadays. If they spreaded there genes there is not problem and once in a while you hunt/harvest ( hate that word) a big tusker.
 
Nothing scientific about this article. This was written by an anti hunting group, with the science of poppycock.
 
This would not have happened, if two big tuckers were not taken on the Tanzania side. The prior operator honored that cross border agreement and the new one, did not.

From the many lengthy interviews on the podcast of “Bloodlines” about this specific topic, on the hunting of those big Tuskers, it sounds like the reality on the ground is a little more complicated than just an informal border agreement to be respected.
 
Ummm hunters burn the body’s? Why?
 
Based on the amount of wood it took for me to burn two goats to bone, I’d say the real risk was deforestation if they indeed burned an elephant. Love to know how they did it because clearly I was doing something wrong.

Maasai adults don't eat meat. I am not sure if this is primarily a Maasai area or not but from what I read, the locals don't eat elephant.
 
Ummm hunters burn the body’s? Why?

And for those who don’t have time to open the letter. The local people have poisoned many kill sights to try and kill (lions) that mess with their way of life.

Poisoning of a kill sight to target lion kills any and all. Many birds (clean up crew)
heyenna , badgers, small cats, old or young.

But if you have the time I encourage anyone with an opinion on this topic to read
Mr. Matheakis letter. It comes from true science and a passion for wildlife and a love of Tanzania.
 
Maasai adults don't eat meat. I am not sure if this is primarily a Maasai area or not but from what I read, the locals don't eat elephant.
I understand WHY they burn it (to avoid the carcass being poisoned), I’d just like to know HOW they did it.
 

Everyone should read this letter from Michel Matheakis in response to backlash.

He clears up your question in the letter. @Sideshow
@dchum thank you very much for posting that letter. I found it very educational. I didn’t know that the villagers don’t eat the elephant meat. Also to stop the poisoning of predators.
The facts and figures most interesting and well worth the read for anyone else.
 
From the many lengthy interviews on the podcast of “Bloodlines” about this specific topic, on the hunting of those big Tuskers, it sounds like the reality on the ground is a little more complicated than just an informal border agreement to be respected.

It was actually a written agreement between Kenya and Tanzania that had expired, but was still being honored by the old operator in Tanzania. The concession changed operators and the new operator did not honor the agreement.

Now this is what we get because of those two hunts. There was a big discussion elsewhere. It’s too bad that hunters can’t police themselves.
 
Why the agreement in the first place? Because Kenya does not recognize good game management and is anti hunting?! If they wanted more big tuskers maybe they shouldn't implemented a total hunting ban back in the 70's if I remember correctly. Outside the parks the elephant are almost gone (read poached and sold by complicit government officials)

Good riddance that the agreement is gone. If the elephants are old and spread their genes already hunt them. Let the community benefit of the financial rewards and motivate them to actively protect the next generation of big tuskers until they are old enough to be hunted.

And last the agreement expired ergo no agreement.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
55,690
Messages
1,185,056
Members
97,198
Latest member
Blaubeerchen44
 

 

 

Latest posts

Latest profile posts

T/C wrote on Dewald's profile.
Hi Dewald,
I am looking for a copy of Wright's "Shooting the British Double Rifle" (3E).
Please PM me (T/C) if you still have one.
Thank you very much in advance!!!
I am game for a meat and eat. My attempt at humor.
rigby 416 wrote on rifletuner's profile.
Come from cz like that.
John A Flaws wrote on Horbs's profile.
500 schuler magazine.jpg
500 schuler bore.jpg
500 and 425 rifles.jpg
500 and 425 magaizne.jpg
 
Top