Question about Ducks in Ontario Timber

Pheroze

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I have low level on my property that seems to have three ponds in amongst the timber. Each one is a few hundred yards across. A couple of hikes in while hunting deer prove the area to be quite flooded, with various trees and grasses. These ponds look deeper than what I hiked to previously. The forest is very dense.

Screenshot_20210802-190718_Maps.jpg


This property is only about 3 or 4 miles from a large lake that is well known for ducks.

My question is whether these flooded areas have duck potential. Or does the close proximity to the large lake really rule out that potential. If there is duck potential I am thinking of researching how to make it more appealing to the ducks. Any insight and advice would be appreciated! I am just trying to make a plan for the use of the area, and I am curious whether waterfowl would be in the cards.

Hunting ducks in timber looks like a lot of fun!

Thanks guys.
 
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An invitation to do a project in those ponds might be of interest to them.
Instead of the secretary fobbing you off with a brochure.
 
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Without knowing more, I suspect that there is a lot of potential. Go in at first and last light. You may find that they are already using them.
 
We hunt ducks in Texas on small ponds that are close to a big impoundment that holds large numbers of ducks overnight. In the morning they fly out to the smaller ponds to feed and loaf. Then they return to the big lake in the late afternoon. So, if you see a pond that’s holding ducks during the day, there’s a good chance they’ll be back the next morning.
 
An invitation to do a project might in those ponds might be of interest to them.
Instead of the secretary fobbing you off with a brochure.
I have considered this. But, I am proceeding slowly before making such deals primarily out of ignorance of what it would mean.
 
Wood ducks and flooded timber in early season should be a given (at least here in Pennsylvania it is). Wood ducks avoid open water. It won’t necessarily make it more appealing during hunting season, but it’s very easy to put out wood duck nesting boxes. We probably have about 20 boxes out on our property and nearly all are used each year. We clean them out each winter and add fresh saw dust.
 
Wood ducks and flooded timber in early season should be a given (at least here in Pennsylvania it is). Wood ducks avoid open water. It won’t necessarily make it more appealing during hunting season, but it’s very easy to put out wood duck nesting boxes. We probably have about 20 boxes out on our property and nearly all are used each year. We clean them out each winter and add fresh saw dust.
Do you hunt over the same ponds that you provide the nesting? I was looking at these boxes sold through Delta Waterfowl.
 
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Do you hunt over the same ponds that you provide the nesting? I was looking at these boxes sold through Delta Waterfowl.
We don’t anymore, but we let our friends jump shoot them sometimes. We don’t have any huge tracts of flooded timber here like yours that you can sit on. All our large marshes are on public land. Mine and my Dad’s properties have a quite a few ponds that have been put in and about a 1 acre flooded beaver pond on the one small creek. Here’s one of the original ponds about 30 years old now to give you an idea. We’ve actually never seen baby wood ducks on our property, my guess is they hatch and head to bigger beaver ponds on the main creek where there is more connected water. I do see them frequently kayaking on the large marshes where the game commission has their own wood duck boxes out. If you decide to put boxes some advice, either make sure it’s very rough below the hole or staple some wire with the small squares to let the baby ducks crawl out of the box easy. If it’s sanded smooth they may get stuck in the box. Also if you put on a tree put some smooth sheet metal around tree below box to deter raccoons and if you put on a metal pole smear Vaseline all over the pole so raccoons can’t climb up them as easy. If it’s big water ice might bend the pole in early spring so keep it in shallows but where there is still enough solid ice to stand on it in winter. I’m not an expert but we’ve had some trial and error learning curves.
C56491BF-5970-44F5-8E83-4E8FFB1BDBE0.jpeg
 
+1 on wood duck boxes. They work, but should be cleaned.
my grandfather used dynamite to make two small ponds in our wetlands. We regularly get other species of ducks in the ponds, even though there are multiple lakes in the area. It is definitely worth the effort! (And it is conservation work on a small scale, but if we all do a little bit, it will have a massive impact.)
 
IMO you have prime spots! Probably won't have big shoots but will have a couple of honey holes that should produce under the right conditions!!
 
I did and they sent me a brochure on how to remediate wetlands. But I suspect my question may be too hypothetical without more information.
You need to ask to speak to their regional biologist if you want to get real answers.
 
As others have stated they probably already have ducks on them, a lot of the smaller bodies are pretty productive after ducks get a little wary, you might be able to put in some food plantings as an attractant also, I get wood ducks in my flooded timber and beaver pond in the U.P. Of MI
 
Planting feed along the shoreline might help bring them in from big water in the mornings. At least that worked for us in Kansas on a duck lease many years ago. This is just a thought. Others know much more about this than me.

All the best.
 
Thanks, guys! it's like going to the encyclopedia of hunting here!

I like the idea of feed and I like the idea of nesting for wood ducks. These are such gorgeous birds. Please keep any advice, concerns etc for the area coming. This will be an interesting project.
 
We also have large lakes in the area and the ducks don't care if they find something to eat at your place.
I have been able to observe a system for years.
The smaller the water, the greater the success
Daily(as often as it is possible for you), feed with corn for example, wheat or barley, in the morning, possibly build food flow or several.
Before you feed send the dogs in and drive away all the ducks from the reed,important!!.They will eat their fill and disappear to the big lakes for resting..
The grain is quite expensive but the ducks and the hunt will thank you.
Don't hunt often,rest by the water and hunt hard from time to time (i know you have quotas)
Only hunt on the evening,do not let the dogs into the water until the hunt is over.
In our place was not shot one duck(as well as), since the concession neighbor uses this system, now 300 a year !!
Waidmannsheil and good luck.
Foxi
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or so,you dont need a larger water.Ducks eat like elephants :)
Feed them and you have it.
 
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