Extended vs regular chokes

There’s an aftermarket barrel for the Mossberg 835 that’s 18.5”. I think mine is 22”. It’s been a long time since I have done any printing with it.

Everyone seems to dog on Mossbergs, but I’ve never had problems with mine.
Ya hear that @Forrest Halley?
 
I'v heard that with the external chokes pellets travel for longer distance vs the regular.
But i know that the number of the choke (ex: F,IM,M,IC,C) is what matters when it comes to your distance from the target.
so what is so special about the external chokes?

Another reason:

Extended chokes create restriction outside of the barrel. It's handy to put that wear and tear passed the muzzle. I have a side by side 12 bore that has extended chokes and I shoot steel through it. Someday, if the steel is too hard, or if the wad malfunctions, I'm going to damage those chokes. I'm out $150 rather than $14,000.
 
There’s an aftermarket barrel for the Mossberg 835 that’s 18.5”. I think mine is 22”. It’s been a long time since I have done any printing with it.

Everyone seems to dog on Mossbergs, but I’ve never had problems with mine.
Cheap but those 500s do work. They take Winchoke or Invector (same same). Much better shotgun than 870 Express but that's not saying much.
 
@BourbonTrail & @Forrest Halley - I found the Mossberg 935 3.5” chamber and 18” barrel. Only problem…it’s rifled. Available at Midwest Gun Works.
 
I'v heard that with the external chokes pellets travel for longer distance vs the regular.
But i know that the number of the choke (ex: F,IM,M,IC,C) is what matters when it comes to your distance from the target.
so what is so special about the external chokes?
Null754 - I can’t understand why “choke” would increase pellet travel distance?? That is related to velosity. I’ve heard some studies that show tighter choke constriction (Full vs. IC) can increase velosity “slightly“ but even that was only a few FPS and almost meaningless. I’ve never heard that extended choke tubes “increase pellet distance” vs regular flush mount choke tubes?
 
Extended chokes can be nice for changing in the field, but nowadays I am generally sticking with one choke save bird hunting.

With my extended chokes I actually lubricate the internal threads and wipe the choke down before applying loctite blue to the choke threads. I tighten and use a sharpie to make a witness mark so I can see that the choke is tight.

As others have said the testing phase is the key for best patterns.

As to how the term "pellet travel" is used confuses me. If we are talking about effective range being increased it is a possibility, but no more so than a flush choke if similar constriction. If we are talking a more gradual construction across a longer choke tube, then yes it is a possibility if the extended tube is significantly longer than the flush tube. i have lately come to prefer flush chokes in short barrels and extended chokes in longer barrels. Placebo effect to fullest extent in both cases.
Forrest - I’ve never known anyone that puts on “loctite” on choke tube threads? Most are concerned that the threads can “seize” (over time) and make removal difficult. I do know that choke tubes often “loosen” and may need to be tightened a bit after every 20-30 rounds….I’m a bit Leary of using Loctite but will defer to others that may do this as a common practice.
 
No loctite for me…

I simply use a quality, precision made choke (all of our chokes for all of our shotguns are Briley), and screw them in slightly tighter than hand tight with a briley choke wrench…

I’ve never had one come loose even on a heavy hunting day where a lot of rounds get sent down range… and typically don’t have one come loose even when shooting clays (hundreds of shells in a day).. when shooting trap/skeet I’ll usually do a quick check for tightness after each 25 shot round… but it’s rare I need to retighten more than once in a given day honestly …
 
I got muh Polychoke on muh J C Higgins shotgun. Goin down toodah turkey shoot dis weekend. :ROFLMAO:
237_7.jpg
 
@BourbonTrail & @Forrest Halley - I found the Mossberg 935 3.5” chamber and 18” barrel. Only problem…it’s rifled. Available at Midwest Gun Works.
Please provide the link I was unable to find what you speak of.
Forrest - I’ve never known anyone that puts on “loctite” on choke tube threads? Most are concerned that the threads can “seize” (over time) and make removal difficult. I do know that choke tubes often “loosen” and may need to be tightened a bit after every 20-30 rounds….I’m a bit Leary of using Loctite but will defer to others that may do this as a common practice.
The issue is that what if I need to shoot more than thirty shots between tightenings? I'm supposed to carry a choke tube wrench in the field and tighten the choke a few times a day or in between stages in a competition? Thank you no.
#1 I use releasable loctite(blue) on lubed grooves and a wiped down tube and #2 any shotgun can be likely be fired enough to get the barrel hot enough to release red loctite.
No loctite for me…

I simply use a quality, precision made choke (all of our chokes for all of our shotguns are Briley), and screw them in slightly tighter than hand tight with a briley choke wrench…

I’ve never had one come loose even on a heavy hunting day where a lot of rounds get sent down range… and typically don’t have one come loose even when shooting clays (hundreds of shells in a day).. when shooting trap/skeet I’ll usually do a quick check for tightness after each 25 shot round… but it’s rare I need to retighten more than once in a given day honestly …
The issue that started my lecture use was that some extended chokes did not have provisions to take a wrench.
 

Attachments

  • Mossberg 935 12 Ga. Fully Rifled Barrel, Integral Scope Base: MGW.pdf
    237.5 KB · Views: 16
In certain applications like turkey hunting with modern, ultra hard pellets etc or specialty waterfowl loads, the extended chokes can offer the ability to more readily fine tune patterns, no doubt. However, when it comes to standard lead target loads, lead upland loads etc....they offer nothing more than a convenient way to change chokes on the sporting clays field......if you're into swapping chokes around. I've ordered a number of bespoke Perazzis and work directly with the factory in the process. When you talk to those guys on chokes and barrels (again, using quality lead target and upland loads vs turkey loads or non-tox waterfowl loads) it's very simple....they say skip choke tubes and go with fixed 1/2 and 1/4 choke resulting in a simple, well-balanced set of barrels. Proper stock fit and overall balance (again, talking about target guns and/or wingshooting shotguns vs turkey guns) are far more important than choke (tubes).

.410 patterns are generally calculated at 25 yards, all other gauges are done at 40 yards. All gauges use a 30" circle for calculation
 
I personally strongly believe the whole choke tube thing is designed to bag more gun owners than game or clays. While I do have a modern SxS and and couple of OU's with flush choke tubes, I can not remember when I last changed them. The vast majority of my guns have the chokes with which they left the gunmaker. I do not use steel in any of them.

I think the Brits had it about right when they created the classic game gun. The open right barrel was for near targets and the tight left barrel was for those farther away. Like me, they seemingly rarely experienced a target at modified range. They too built specialized guns with specialized chokes. My pigeon guns all have 30 or 32-inch barrels and are typically choked IM or light full and full. A modern gun set up for turkey makes sense for such a specialized application. Though I personally have never had one fail to drop when hit with a full choke load from one of my SxS's.

Where I think a choke tube set is useful is for those who must use the same gun for a number of disciplines, whether hunting or clays. But, what drives me a little crazy is watching someone madly twirling tubes between stations or in a duck blind.

I will admit that I developed that prejudice early. My first shotgun when I was around 10 or 12 was a Ted Williams 20 equipped with a polychoke. I would spin the stupid thing between birds trying to get the perfect setting. One morning, I twisted it a bit too far and shot it off across the marsh. My next gun was a Model 12 full, and I quit worrying about patterns and concentrated on hitting.
 
100%, look to the Brits when it comes to traditional shotgunning questions/technique/fit.
 
Please provide the link I was unable to find what you speak of.

The issue is that what if I need to shoot more than thirty shots between tightenings? I'm supposed to carry a choke tube wrench in the field and tighten the choke a few times a day or in between stages in a competition? Thank you no.
#1 I use releasable loctite(blue) on lubed grooves and a wiped down tube and #2 any shotgun can be likely be fired enough to get the barrel hot enough to release red loctite.

The issue that started my lecture use was that some extended chokes did not have provisions to take a wrench.
I always check my A5 Magnum Twelve's Invector choke from time to time at the range. If it's loose I slip my finger down the throat and spin it tight. Good enough. No need for a wrench. I think shooting thirty boxes without tightening would not loosen the choke enough for it to be at risk of detachment. Heck, changing chokes almost requires a lunch break because there's so much threading. I shot a round of skeet with choke tube missing and still had no trouble installing a full choke to shoot the following round of trap. Didn't hurt a thing and I shot that skeet round just slightly above average.
 
Forrest - I’ve never known anyone that puts on “loctite” on choke tube threads? Most are concerned that the threads can “seize” (over time) and make removal difficult. I do know that choke tubes often “loosen” and may need to be tightened a bit after every 20-30 rounds….I’m a bit Leary of using Loctite but will defer to others that may do this as a common practice.
Likewise, I have never heard of anyone using Loctight on choke threads. Seems to defeat the purpose of having removable chokes.
 
I always check my A5 Magnum Twelve's Invector choke from time to time at the range. If it's loose I slip my finger down the throat and spin it tight. Good enough. No need for a wrench. I think shooting thirty boxes without tightening would not loosen the choke enough for it to be at risk of detachment. Heck, changing chokes almost requires a lunch break because there's so much threading. I shot a round of skeet with choke tube missing and still had no trouble installing a full choke to shoot the following round of trap. Didn't hurt a thing and I shot that skeet round just slightly above average.
Yes. The best sporting clays shooter I know uses an old Beretta 391 with factory tubes. 95% of targets he shoots with a Mod + #7.5s and for anything really close he pulls the tube out completely and uses #8s. Brutally effective shooter
 
There’s an aftermarket barrel for the Mossberg 835 that’s 18.5”. I think mine is 22”. It’s been a long time since I have done any printing with it.

Everyone seems to dog on Mossbergs, but I’ve never had problems with mine.
I'd be interested to see it. My Mossberg came with a 24" barrel originally. I was able to buy from Mossberg a 20" barrel and have them skip the porting. Interestingly enough I had a problem with this gun releasing the shell from the magazine tube after I had cycled the action. Bang...click! There'd be a fresh shell on the ground. I called them and a new part was sent out. I had no issues since.
 
Please provide the link I was unable to find what you speak of.

The issue is that what if I need to shoot more than thirty shots between tightenings? I'm supposed to carry a choke tube wrench in the field and tighten the choke a few times a day or in between stages in a competition? Thank you no.
#1 I use releasable loctite(blue) on lubed grooves and a wiped down tube and #2 any shotgun can be likely be fired enough to get the barrel hot enough to release red loctite.

The issue that started my lecture use was that some extended chokes did not have provisions to take a wrench.
Forest, for any flush mount choke tube you never need a choke wrench just to tighten a loose choke - your finger will work and get it from loose to “very snug”….and if you need tighter use the rim of an empty 12ga shell (or a 20 ga shell for 20 ga etc..). However, for a “stuck” choke always use a properly sized choke wrench. If you always use Loctite with success - keep doing it but at some point you might need a jackhammer to get that choke out!! (Kidding - I Hope).
 
Sweet Baby HayZeus! The doubters are out in force!

I use the releasable loctite blue which is removable I have used it for a decade like this for choke tubes on competition guns and also for screws on competition revolvers. Any time I have needed to remove anything I have had no issues.

The only limitation I have found is on T10 and smaller ToRx I would recommend the purple releasable loctite for those as the blue is too much torque for the wrench/bit.

Personally this is what I do. I haven't shot any chokes out, or fired any guns without tubes installed, and a quarter works like a charm if you forget your choke tube wrench. This was only intended to provide a possible solution to the select few that might enjoy a little less checking up on a choke tube.

Do enjoy your weekends.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
55,061
Messages
1,169,478
Members
95,657
Latest member
TabithaCor
 

 

 

Latest profile posts

A.A. wrote on Msprenger!'s profile.
Are you still looking for a 375 H&H?
NRA Life, ASSRA Life, GGCA Life
Sable @ the lodge this morning

Buffalo encounter this morning!

here with available dates for 2024/25

1-13 September 2024
14-31 October 2024
1-7 November 2024
18-24 November 2024

March 2025 is wide open!
12-17 April 2025
24-28 May 2025
15-21 June 2025
7-12 July 2025
22-28 July 2025
13-31 August 2025
15-30 September 2025

October and November 2025 is wide open!
 
Top