The Big Bore Dilemma

Forrest Halley

AH fanatic
Joined
Jul 28, 2019
Messages
816
Reaction score
1,093
Location
VA, USA
Media
25
How come nobody says anything about peep sights and variable apertures? Scope this or iron sights that, but little about peeps. Didn't somebody have an article about the PH course and how several of the serious candidates were running apertures? They seem to have the best low light performance of any non telescopic sight I have used. I practice in the twilight and setting sun. It's not ideal but you get used to it.
 

kurpfalzjäger

AH enthusiast
Joined
Sep 1, 2019
Messages
441
Reaction score
628
Media
9
How come nobody says anything about peep sights and variable apertures? Scope this or iron sights that, but little about peeps. Didn't somebody have an article about the PH course and how several of the serious candidates were running apertures? They seem to have the best low light performance of any non telescopic sight I have used. I practice in the twilight and setting sun. It's not ideal but you get used to it.

Such devices are not common on classic big bore hunting rifles. Although there is the Rigby style diopter , but peep sights or variable apertures are more likely to be found on combat rifles.

This devices are superior to classic open sights especially when it comes to locking a target quickly and shooting fast , but IMHO cannot replace a scope with magnification and light amplification when it comes to a very accurate shot placement.
 

One Day...

Gold supporter
AH elite
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Messages
1,256
Reaction score
3,286
Website
www.huntershillsafaris.co.za
Media
381
Articles
1
Hunting reports
Africa
3
Member of
PHASA
Hunted
Europe, America, Canada, Africa
Recoil

Here is the data:

  • .300 Win. Mag. shooting 180 gr at 2,960 fps in a 8.5 lbs rifle generates 26 ft/lbs of free recoil at 14 fps.
  • .375 H&H Mag. shooting 300 gr at 2,530 fps in a 10 lbs rifle generates 33 ft/lbs of free recoil at 16 fps.
  • .404 Jeffery shooting 400 gr at 2,170 fps in a 10 lbs rifle generates 42 ft/lbs of free recoil at 16 fps.
  • .416 Rigby shooting 400 gr at 2,400 fps in a 10 lbs rifle generates 56 ft/lbs of free recoil at 19 fps.
  • .458 Win. Mag. shooting 500 gr at 2,100 fps in a 10 lbs rifle generates 55 ft/lbs of free recoil at 21 fps.
  • .458 Lott shooting 500 gr at 2,300 fps in a 10 lbs rifle generates 71 ft/lbs of free recoil at 21 fps.
  • .470 NE shooting 500 gr at 2,150 fps in a 11 lbs rifle generates 69 ft/lbs of free recoil at 20 fps.

Observe that both the energy (ft/lbs) and the speed (fps) contribute to perceived recoil.

The data verifies a few well known empirical truths:
  • .375 H&H is the recommended minimum for DG for visiting sportsmen, because while combining decent frontal area (caliber) and bullet weight (300 gr), it recoils not much more than a .300 Win. This makes it easy to shoot. It is a great compromise of a caliber. This, I suspect, is the primary reason why it is so popular.
  • .404 Jeffery is well liked in the .40 cal club because it has the frontal area of a .40; it shoots a 400 gr bullet; and its recoil is not dramatically more than the recoil of the .375 H&H. It genuinely approaches the effectiveness of the .416 Rigby (while lacking some of its penetration) but it is markedly easier to shoot. This, I suspect, is why it occupies a special niche.
  • .416 Rigby (and all its modern derivatives trying to copy it in shorter cases, albeit at significantly higher pressure) truly bridges the gap between the .375 and the .45. In so many words, it delivers a .450 / .458 / .470 punch (albeit with less frontal area) with almost the ballistic trajectory of a .375. It can handle a charge (although not being the best at it) and it can still shoot plains game at 250 yards (although not being the best at it). In addition, its 400 gr bullet at 2,400 fps has deeper penetration than the .450 / .458 / .470. This dual-role, I suspect, is why many past or present professionals like(d) it as their all-around rifle.
  • .458 Lott is at the very edge (and often beyond the edge) of what most people can shoot accurately. It simply recoils too much...
Scopes

The debate will rage as to whether a wide rear V; a diopter / aperture rear sight (peep sight); or a scope is faster. Here are a few thoughts:
  • Practice is likely the most important variable in the speed discussion.
  • An aperture rear sight will unquestionably be more accurate than a rear wide V. Whether it is faster is likely again a question of practice.
  • To be a valid "stopper rifle" aiming device, a scope must have a very low or preferably NO magnification and a very wide field of view.
  • I would include in this discussion the newer "red dot" sights, whether built in traditional scope form or, preferably in my mind, the holographic ones, espescially the ones that can be installed forward on the barrel where rear sights traditionally stand.
  • The major drawbacks to traditional tube scopes, even the 1x no magnification scopes, on "stopper rifles" are:
    • Ability to withstand the recoil and retain zero. This seems to be achieved easily by the better makers of both scopes and mounts, but it remains amazingly common for scope bases to sheer their screws; scopes to slide in their rings; rings to move on their bases, etc.
    • The very high risk of injury to the shooter (from the classic scope scar on the forehead, to the potential loss of an eye) in case of quick shooting of very high recoil rifles, when the shooter's mind is not focused on controlling the rifle.
My own personal experience

I do not have the field experience in Africa necessary of profess an opinion as to compared repeated effectiveness on game. Darn few of us do these days, and even the pros today do not have the beginning of the experience that the pros of yesterday had: what with control work on thousands of elephants and buffalo, 3-buffalo-per-license clients, constant big-5 clients, etc. But I have been shooting DG calibers for the better part of 30 years, so I can share that:
  • The .375 H&H is not an issue for me. Mine is a customized CZ 550. I have a great eye relief Leica ER i 2.5-10 x 42 on it and I shoot it without a thought as easily as a .300.
  • The .416 (mine is a Rigby on a customized CZ 550) requires that I remember not to crawl the stock. I have an indestructible 1970's Schmidt & Bender 1.25-4 x 20 on it, which has a long 4" rear ocular and a short 3" eye relief (not the best combination!). I have come perilously close to be cut by it in fast shooting on the run. Feeling the bump on the forehead but not cutting the skin. I have been patiently on the lookout for a used Leica Visus 1-4 x 24 with short 3" rear ocular and a long 4" eye relief. The extra 1 inch of margin will allow me to shoot it without a second thought.
  • I would not dare put a scope on my .458 Lott, but this is admittedly because mine, a Mauser 66, is just too light. At 8 lbs 13 oz it dishes out 79 ft/lbs of free recoil. I have a Docter III holographic sight on it that I bought on a whim. I clocked myself with and without it. There is no appreciable difference - for me - in shooting speed or accuracy at 50 yards between rear wide V iron sights and "red dot" holographic sight. After about 20 rounds I develop a mild headache, the sure medical sign of a small concussion... It comes back too hard and too fast. A heavier rifle would be much better. Keep in mind that a 10% increase in rifle weight causes a 10% decrease in free recoil...
  • I can shoot my .470 NE "all day long." Mine is a Kreighoff. It certainly kicks, but it comes back just a bit slower than the .458 Win or Lott and it seems to make a difference. I also like its 11 lbs 6 oz weight with a kick stop in the stock. The fact that the stock happens to fit me really well is also likely a big contributor in perceived gentler recoil than what the pure data says.
Do you need a "stopper"?

The obvious answer is no, but this is not the right question.

The real question is to you want a stopper? Many of us answer yes, but I also note that a large number of stopper rifles in the US rarely fire more than half a dozen shots per year.

There is a lesson in that: it is not fun when it hurts. So, I would suggest to approach the subject progressively. Three clear advice would be: try to fire a friend's "Stopper" before you shell out your hard earned money; and fire a few boxes from your new .458 Lott using iron sights before thinking about putting a scope on it; and keep in mind that you will be shooting it a 50 yards anyway, where it is difficult to miss a cantaloupe even with iron sights...
 
Last edited:

Opposite Pole

AH elite
Joined
Jun 6, 2017
Messages
1,105
Reaction score
1,472
Location
Warsaw & Sydney
Media
95
Member of
SSAA; PZŁ, KŁ Sęp
Hunted
Australia, Poland
I have been patiently on the lookout for a used Leica Visus 1-4 x 24

Great little scope, I have one installed on 9.3x74R barrels on my Krieghoff Big Five double. I’ve got the rail version which to me seems superior to the rings in every way.
 

CBH Australia

AH elite
Joined
Feb 10, 2019
Messages
1,652
Reaction score
2,084
Location
NSW Australia
Media
16
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
Sporting Shooters Association Australia, Africa Hunting website!!!
Hunted
Australia and now South Africa
@One Day...
That’s an informative answer and a good response to my question.
So now I ask my self do I want a stopper?
I missed out on the Lott it was well priced and sold in a day on usedguns.com.au.
It seemed silly to rush in on that having just sold my .458 and the components I had. I could start over but can I justify the cost.
Yes it may we’ll only fire 6 shots a year if I had it but I also hope the Lott May feed better than the shorter wm I had.
Point taken on the scope or advice against it.
I’m going to try my EoTech holo on my Tikka CTR for some hunting pigs on foot.
I’ve heard the Aimpoint are very tough and reliable. The Eotech should be too but i haven’t been heard of them mounted on cannons and took it
they were more intended in combat roles and rifles up to .308 sort of class.
If i stop getting distracted I will take that .375 out and make sure I get past that quota of 6 shots per year it’s fun to shoot it needs to get out some more.
 

Dr Ray

AH legend
Joined
Apr 1, 2017
Messages
2,704
Reaction score
2,799
Location
Cairns, Australia
Media
52
Articles
5
Hunting reports
Australia/NZ
5
.375H&H is the ultimate all-rounder, the bigger stuff just lets you feel a little more secure if something jumps out to give you a fright.

I agree with you / an excellent choice.
I’ve fallen in love with my 416 Remington magnum!
My 375 just sits in my safe so forlorn!
 

CBH Australia

AH elite
Joined
Feb 10, 2019
Messages
1,652
Reaction score
2,084
Location
NSW Australia
Media
16
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
Sporting Shooters Association Australia, Africa Hunting website!!!
Hunted
Australia and now South Africa
Dr, I did some reading on some .416 rounds, sounds like the Rem Mag matches the others in performance and the info from One day on .416Rigby and it’s derivatives places it nicely in a usable category.

Any comments on optics? I have a Leupold VX3 for my .375 but the info from one day has opened my eyes.
I like the traditional look and the nostalgia of an era I didn’t see but if I don’t have a stopping rifle or I do buy a stopping rifle I don’t want to get it if I am faced with a wounded water buff or scrub bull. Hell even pigs in thick cover.
 

HWL

AH elite
Joined
Aug 29, 2016
Messages
1,144
Reaction score
2,013
Location
Germany
Media
203
Hunted
RSA, Namibia, Germany, Austria, Norway
I’ve fallen in love with my 416 Remington magnum!
My 375 just sits in my safe so forlorn!

Don't worry, your .375 never ever was a Big Bore!

:sneaky:

HWL
 

Foxi

Bronze supporter
AH elite
Joined
Jul 31, 2012
Messages
1,688
Reaction score
2,855
Location
Germany
Media
185
Articles
7
Hunting reports
Africa
4
Europe
1
Hunted
Canada, USA,Austria,Turkey,Tschech Rep.,Poland,Hungary,Serbia,Denmark,Khomas HL and Omaheke/Namibia and England(England is wonderful) Romania,Luangwa/Zambia-,Gwayi/Zimbabwe/- + Save/Zimbabwe/- River. Horseback-tours in South Africa and Botswana.

Forrest Halley

AH fanatic
Joined
Jul 28, 2019
Messages
816
Reaction score
1,093
Location
VA, USA
Media
25
  • That Twinkie No. 2 Nitro Express really shakes the Earth when fired. Launching a celophane jacketed 38.5g projectile twenty-five feet from the muzzle unleashing 9,000 joules of energy in gluttonous madness as the cellulite monstress thunders across the Serengeti to devour it.
 

Bullthrower338

AH legend
Joined
Sep 20, 2014
Messages
4,479
Reaction score
10,351
Location
Houston, Texas and Alder, MT
Media
180
Hunting reports
Africa
2
USA/Canada
1
Australia/NZ
2
Member of
Life Member Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, NRA, Huntin' Fool, DSC and Pope and Young Club
Hunted
USA, Mexico, Canada, RSA, Australia NT, Zimbabwe

Dr Ray

AH legend
Joined
Apr 1, 2017
Messages
2,704
Reaction score
2,799
Location
Cairns, Australia
Media
52
Articles
5
Hunting reports
Australia/NZ
5
Dr, I did some reading on some .416 rounds, sounds like the Rem Mag matches the others in performance and the info from One day on .416Rigby and it’s derivatives places it nicely in a usable category.

Any comments on optics? I have a Leupold VX3 for my .375 but the info from one day has opened my eyes.
I like the traditional look and the nostalgia of an era I didn’t see but if I don’t have a stopping rifle or I do buy a stopping rifle I don’t want to get it if I am faced with a wounded water buff or scrub bull. Hell even pigs in thick cover.

Real men use 416s! Lol!
Scopes - I really like my Swarovski but on heavy recoiling rifles I use Leupold. I been whacked twice using a Weatherby 460! And the rubber ringed (fortunately) scope whacked me.
Worst headaches I have ever experienced and I might add they were instant.
I suggest that what you have it fine.
Let’s say that after using the 416 Rem I wonder what I’d do with the 375 sob sob!!
 

Forrest Halley

AH fanatic
Joined
Jul 28, 2019
Messages
816
Reaction score
1,093
Location
VA, USA
Media
25
Let’s say that after using the 416 Rem I wonder what I’d do with the 375 sob sob!!
Load it with VLD bullets and watch it out pace all your other rifles at distance??
 

Dr. Crack

AH veteran
Joined
Mar 2, 2020
Messages
125
Reaction score
83
Location
Pa, USA
Media
1
Member of
NRA
Big Bore Rifles. And their utility in today's Africa.

In a recent online discussion, I opined that the 375 H&H was the KING of African calibers. While my take was based more on the versatility of this great medium bore cartridge, than pure horsepower. I was challenged by a few readers, that stated the (to them) obvious conclusion, that the ole Holland and Holland was not only less than a big bore, it was also boring and mundane. The buffalo would snicker, and Mr. Jumbo would piss his pants in laughter at the mere thought of a foreigner armed with such a puny weapon. I was left in defense mode. I couldn't believe the audacity of these people questioning the validity of my favorite caliber! I mean, I love large caliber rifles as much as the next guy, but I also know they are largely unnecessary in today's world of premium bullets and limited dangerous game bag limits. One 300 grain Swift through the boiler room of Black Death, or a 350 grain solid through the brain pan of the largest bull ele, would surely answer all questions of adequacy. But for those of you that demand more, let's move up a bit in inches. The .400 plus caliber rifles await.

Not to ruffle any feathers, but I will skip over Teddy Roosevelt's darlng 405 Winchester. With it's low SD 300 grain bullets, it offers nothing over a 375, and I would even put it behind by quite a margin.

Now we enter the realm of true Buffalo smashing cartridges. Cartridges that will penetrate an Enraged bull Hippo from most any angle. But, your shoulder will deny that you've fired much more than a heavily loaded 375 when the powder ignites. We come to the 450/400 and 404 Jeffrey on the low end, then step up to the middle ground 416 Rem Mag, 416 Ruger and Rigby. This is where buffalo rifles could and probably should end. Ah....but you say...there are indeed cartridges above this power level in the 400 class. With these we get into bullet and shoulder destroying velocities. 400 grain bullets traveling at a flinch inducing 2700 fps. Enter the 416 Weatherby and it's kin. To me, once this level of recoil is reached, it's time to step up in diameter once again. The 45 caliber rifles are the next step in the upward direction.

We will start by defending a cartridge that some people love to hate. And by denouncing a cartridge that is praised by some, but in reality falls quite short of the mark in this discussion. The 458 Win Mag with today's propellants and great bullets, is where our 45 caliber discussion begins. It does not begin with the 45/70.
A 450-480 grain 45 caliber bullet traveling at a mild 2150-2250 fps should get the attention of most anything that needs attending to. And if that doesn't work out, then either run, or reach for the next group of 45s. The 458 Lott and 450 Rigby. These two are what most consider the pinnacle of big bore cartridges. (We could also throw in the 450 and 470 Nitro Express in this category.) And to most, we are on the ragged edge of controllability. We are holding a rifle that when used in the right hands, needs no besting. But then there are the people that just have to have more. For the few that can handle it, the 460 Weatherby is there. Now we are way past controllability. At this point, we may as well step up to the ultimate. Now we go to a half inch and above.

The .500 through .600 class of cartridges are really only a discussion for the professionals. This level of horsepower is of very limited use. But, when a wounded Cape Buffalo or an enraged Cow Elephant is baring down on you, you must put an abrupt halt to these types of situations. There is little room for error. There is even less time. You must stop it now! Now we are talking about the 500 Jeffrey, 505 Gibbs, 500 Nitro Express, 577 Nitro Express and the be all and end all 600 Nitro Express. We are propelling 570-900 grain bullets anywhere from 2050-2300 fps. Rifles that only the most determined of men can handle. Many hours of practice is needed to master this level of performance. A level of power that is actually dangerous if not handled correctly. But, when applied in the appropriate manner, has no equal.

In the end, while we could make a good argument for the utility of these big bore rifles in Africa, we could all probably agree that for most of us, the 416 and maybe the 458 caliber rifles are the biggest step needed above the grand old 375. And need...my friends...is a very subjective word.
Great post
 

Dr. Crack

AH veteran
Joined
Mar 2, 2020
Messages
125
Reaction score
83
Location
Pa, USA
Media
1
Member of
NRA
Recoil

Here is the data:

  • .300 Win. Mag. shooting 180 gr at 2,960 fps in a 8.5 lbs rifle generates 26 ft/lbs of free recoil at 14 fps.
  • .375 H&H Mag. shooting 300 gr at 2,530 fps in a 10 lbs rifle generates 33 ft/lbs of free recoil at 16 fps.
  • .404 Jeffery shooting 400 gr at 2,170 fps in a 10 lbs rifle generates 42 ft/lbs of free recoil at 16 fps.
  • .416 Rigby shooting 400 gr at 2,400 fps in a 10 lbs rifle generates 56 ft/lbs of free recoil at 19 fps.
  • .458 Win. Mag. shooting 500 gr at 2,100 fps in a 10 lbs rifle generates 55 ft/lbs of free recoil at 21 fps.
  • .458 Lott shooting 500 gr at 2,300 fps in a 10 lbs rifle generates 71 ft/lbs of free recoil at 21 fps.
  • .470 NE shooting 500 gr at 2,150 fps in a 11 lbs rifle generates 69 ft/lbs of free recoil at 20 fps.

Observe that both the energy (ft/lbs) and the speed (fps) contribute to perceived recoil.

The data verifies a few well known empirical truths:
  • .375 H&H is the recommended minimum for DG for visiting sportsmen, because while combining decent frontal area (caliber) and bullet weight (300 gr), it recoils not much more than a .300 Win. This makes it easy to shoot. It is a great compromise of a caliber. This, I suspect, is the primary reason why it is so popular.
  • .404 Jeffery is well liked in the .40 cal club because it has the frontal area of a .40; it shoots a 400 gr bullet; and its recoil is not dramatically more than the recoil of the .375 H&H. It genuinely approaches the effectiveness of the .416 Rigby (while lacking some of its penetration) but it is markedly easier to shoot. This, I suspect, is why it occupies a special niche.
  • .416 Rigby (and all its modern derivatives trying to copy it in shorter cases, albeit at significantly higher pressure) truly bridges the gap between the .375 and the .45. In so many words, it delivers a .450 / .458 / .470 punch (albeit with less frontal area) with almost the ballistic trajectory of a .375. It can handle a charge (although not being the best at it) and it can still shoot plains game at 250 yards (although not being the best at it). In addition, its 400 gr bullet at 2,400 fps has deeper penetration than the .450 / .458 / .470. This dual-role, I suspect, is why many past or present professionals like(d) it as their all-around rifle.
  • .458 Lott is at the very edge (and often beyond the edge) of what most people can shoot accurately. It simply recoils too much...
Scopes

The debate will rage as to whether a wide rear V; a diopter / aperture rear sight (peep sight); or a scope is faster. Here are a few thoughts:
  • Practice is likely the most important variable in the speed discussion.
  • An aperture rear sight will unquestionably be more accurate than a rear wide V. Whether it is faster is likely again a question of practice.
  • To be a valid "stopper rifle" aiming device, a scope must have a very low or preferably NO magnification and a very wide field of view.
  • I would include in this discussion the newer "red dot" sights, whether built in traditional scope form or, preferably in my mind, the holographic ones, espescially the ones that can be installed forward on the barrel where rear sights traditionally stand.
  • The major drawbacks to traditional tube scopes, even the 1x no magnification scopes, on "stopper rifles" are:
    • Ability to withstand the recoil and retain zero. This seems to be achieved easily by the better makers of both scopes and mounts, but it remains amazingly common for scope bases to sheer their screws; scopes to slide in their rings; rings to move on their bases, etc.
    • The very high risk of injury to the shooter (from the classic scope scar on the forehead, to the potential loss of an eye) in case of quick shooting of very high recoil rifles, when the shooter's mind is not focused on controlling the rifle.
My own personal experience

I do not have the field experience in Africa necessary of profess an opinion as to compared repeated effectiveness on game. Darn few of us do these days, and even the pros today do not have the beginning of the experience that the pros of yesterday had: what with control work on thousands of elephants and buffalo, 3-buffalo-per-license clients, constant big-5 clients, etc. But I have been shooting DG calibers for the better part of 30 years, so I can share that:
  • The .375 H&H is not an issue for me. Mine is a customized CZ 550. I have a great eye relief Leica ER i 2.5-10 x 42 on it and I shoot it without a thought as easily as a .300.
  • The .416 (mine is a Rigby on a customized CZ 550) requires that I remember not to crawl the stock. I have an indestructible 1970's Schmidt & Bender 1.25-4 x 20 on it, which has a long 4" rear ocular and a short 3" eye relief (not the best combination!). I have come perilously close to be cut by it in fast shooting on the run. Feeling the bump on the forehead but not cutting the skin. I have been patiently on the lookout for a used Leica Visus 1-4 x 24 with short 3" rear ocular and a long 4" eye relief. The extra 1 inch of margin will allow me to shoot it without a second thought.
  • I would not dare put a scope on my .458 Lott, but this is admittedly because mine, a Mauser 66, is just too light. At 8 lbs 13 oz it dishes out 79 ft/lbs of free recoil. I have a Docter III holographic sight on it that I bought on a whim. I clocked myself with and without it. There is no appreciable difference - for me - in shooting speed or accuracy at 50 yards between rear wide V iron sights and "red dot" holographic sight. After about 20 rounds I develop a mild headache, the sure medical sign of a small concussion... It comes back too hard and too fast. A heavier rifle would be much better. Keep in mind that a 10% increase in rifle weight causes a 10% decrease in free recoil...
  • I can shoot my .470 NE "all day long." Mine is a Kreighoff. It certainly kicks, but it comes back just a bit slower than the .458 Win or Lott and it seems to make a difference. I also like its 11 lbs 6 oz weight with a kick stop in the stock. The fact that the stock happens to fit me really well is also likely a big contributor in perceived gentler recoil than what the pure data says.
Do you need a "stopper"?

The obvious answer is no, but this is not the right question.

The real question is to you want a stopper? Many of us answer yes, but I also note that a large number of stopper rifles in the US rarely fire more than half a dozen shots per year.

There is a lesson in that: it is not fun when it hurts. So, I would suggest to approach the subject progressively. Three clear advice would be: try to fire a friend's "Stopper" before you shell out your hard earned money; and fire a few boxes from your new .458 Lott using iron sights before thinking about putting a scope on it; and keep in mind that you will be shooting it a 50 yards anyway, where it is difficult to miss a cantaloupe even with iron sights...
Let’s not forget that endearing characteristic called Sectional Density for the 41 Cals. Explains the RELATIVE anemia (on paper) of the 450/400 as a top notch Buff-in-stuff, and in good hands, an Elephant soufflé-er....
 

Dr. Crack

AH veteran
Joined
Mar 2, 2020
Messages
125
Reaction score
83
Location
Pa, USA
Media
1
Member of
NRA
I think what may be forgotten about many people on here (I am one of them), is that if we are honest (oh boy....), we want to go to Africa for a DG thrill, to slay our dragon with the “mightiest of the swords,” due to romantic thoughts of post hunt life recounting our tale (tales if lucky) in front of the conservatory fireplace (pellet stove) with our herringbone leather elbow patch dinner jacket (Walmart Fleece), draped in all the drama and manliness we can muster, whilst (while) showing our friends our harrowing escape via sniper like marksmanship (I shot it 10 times, once maybe near the correct spot and the PH killed it afterwards), and nerves of tungsten (I short stroked my bolt (LOL pardon the vernacular) I was so nervous). Hence, ( therefore) we want to take our 404, 416, 423, 458, 460, 470, 475, 500, 505, 585, 600, 700, Gluteus Magnums to slay such a beast (Thompson Gazelle) even though we would be better off with a 375 Honest & Honestly. No?
 

WAB

AH legend
Joined
Oct 8, 2015
Messages
2,802
Reaction score
5,986
Location
Alabama
Media
91
Hunting reports
Africa
5
USA/Canada
1
Member of
DSC, NRA, SCI
Hunted
Zambia, Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Scotland, England, Canada, Alaska, Ireland
Honestly, I just think my Lott is better buffalo medicine than my .375. I shoot them both well and prefer the terminal performance of the Lott to the .375.

I have no problem with those who prefer the .375 and no argument with its ability to harvest buffalo. I simply prefer the Lott and am convinced that it does a better job if the bullet is placed correctly.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
36,705
Messages
695,665
Members
64,451
Latest member
carmalatteN5Taco
 

 

 

Latest profile posts

Rifle57 wrote on Rimshot's profile.
I bought some bullets from Rimshot and he is good to trade with!
Greetings all! I've been a hunter for 50 years, but only now planning a trip to Africa. I was fortunate and successfully bid on a couple hunts for plains game in SA later this year and next. Also a rare Native Texas (5th generation) and USMC Vet. Hunt safe y'all!
uujm wrote on trg's profile.
I am looking for a Safari Express. Was yours made in New Haven or South Carolina? Any other details you can give me? I am very motivated to buy.
pimes wrote on flatwater bill's profile.
Hello Bill - can you tell me that landowner/ranch/outfitter - Thank you!
Pete0905 wrote on damundsen87's profile.
Hello
Is the Khales 1-6 still for sale?
Thanks
Josh
 
Top