Hunting Safaris In Zimbabwe With Martin Pieters Safaris

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AFRICAN CONSERVANCIES ANTI-POACHING 2015

AFRICAN CONSERVANCIES
African Conservancies was established in 2014, it's first project was in Nyaminyami Rural District Council in the Omay Communal Land hunting area. A.C comprises Carbon Green International, the relevant Rural District Council and the relevant community in which the conservation plan falls. A trust has been formed that will include these parties as beneficieries.The primary goal of A.C was to locate a suitable area to form, build and manage a sustainable community conservation area. The Omay 1 hunting area between the Ume and Sengwa Rivers was selected as a perfect phase one. The criteria of selection includes; being communal land hunting area, fall within the C.G.I REDD+ project area.

OBJECTIVES OF AFRICAN CONSERVANCIES
The primary objective of A.C was to select an area within the REDD+ project, (stretching from Binga to Kanyemba in the communal areas) and partner the community and council. The belief in building sustainable conservation areas and in particular enabling communities to truly and directly benefit from from this sustainable utilization is at the core of this project.

The immediate goals with the Ume River Community Conservation Area were to reduce hunting offtake and reduce poaching. The hunting offtake was reduced in 2014 and in 2015. For example, 2014 saw twelve buffalo being hunted from the quota of thirty five. 2015 we will have a buffalo offtake of ten from the possible thirty five. Having done our own numbers on the ground, our offtakes are very conservative and the population increase through relocation due no pressure is clearly visible with far better trophy quality.

Anti poaching began in 2014, the six C.G.I scouts based out of Manyuli camp close to the Gokwe boundary and six scouts based out the Ume hunting camp. We decided at the close of 2014 that the anti poaching was not having enough effect on the structured elephant poaching, so in March 2015 Steve Wentzel and I decided that it needed direction and management. So beginning March, I personally came into the Omay to oversee and manage the anti poaching teams.

I immediately amalgamated the two teams and brought in Mr. Charles Khumalo to head up this new team. Charles is ex Zimbabwean National Army, a brave, dedicated leader who has commanded not only the respect of this unit, but myself and the community at large.

We started in house training incorporating weapons training, tactical house clearances, offensive tracking and building a more intense unit that could cope with a far more aggressive natured outlook to the poaching problems. This immediately began to produce results.

Our focus has been on hardened armed poachers with the theory that the snare and dog meat poachers would be dealt with in the process of eliminating the more "serious" elements.

AREA OF OPERATIONS
Though we in theory are based in the Omay communal land, our operations stretch into Gokwe, around Chizarira and Charisa and Binga. due to our operations being outside of the National Parks we predominantly operate with Police details and R.D.C scouts. Our entire unit has now been accepted as Police reservists and are awaiting their Police force numbers. It has been agreed that our unit having been accepted as reservists, will establish a dedicated reaction team within the police force that I shall train and manage.

OPERATIONS
Begining 2014 we funded the basing of James Mcallwain from MAPP out our hunting camp in Chipfudze on the Southern boundary of the Matusadona National Park. The reasoning for this was obviously to maintain the Parks presence on this boundary, which was non existent due to lack of capacity. Secondarily, James was to establish an informant network that would offer up targets for our unit to react to. This was very effective and results were immediate.

With James leaving MAPP in August 2015, the MAPP trustees unfortunately decided to move their operations back into the Park. This led to a huge information breakdown and vacuum.

August 2015 Charles Khumalo was tasked in resurrecting and bettering the information networks as reacting to shots fired is almost a pointless affair. The poaching teams shoot toward last light, fifteen minutes from shots fired, the elephants face is chopped off and they are moving.There is no way to track them fast enough to catch them up at this stage. The needle in haystack affair is almost pointless for arresting poachers. There are over one hundred and fifty square kilometers of bush to patrol, it would require an army to do this. Our first goal was to bring into operations a full time intelligence operative whome we had been grooming for this position.

The informant/intelligence network has had significant effect, we have over one hundred and twenty people on our books. Over ninety percent of our arrests have occurred and been made possible through the capturing or paying for intel. We have put in place "watchers" who monitor targets and wait for opportunity to ensure arrests have hard tangible evidence for prosecution. "Mapani" whom he was second on our priority list and pulled the trigger on the three elephant days after the Sebungwe Action Plan Meeting; was monitored for four months prior to his arrest late October. Literally we actioned the arrest when his "watcher" informed us that he had begun drinking beer with tusks and firearms still being present. After four long months, he eventually made a mistake!

ARRESTS
Below are a list of arrests of hardened elephant poachers, I have omitted all of our lessor arrests of meat poachers.

February 7th 2015
Reaction to shots fired Matusadona southern boundary resulted in a joint op with Parks rangers with our tracker team. Poaching team ambushed and two armed poachers killed. One "John Raymond" being a casualty of this contact was fourth on our priority list. Firearm 303 recovered.

February 12th 2015
Sting operation on the Gokwe boundary resulted in the arrest of three "dealers" supplying arms and ammo to the poaching syndicates. One tusk, thirty rounds 303 and forty five 7.62 intermediate (AK 47) rounds recovered.

March 12th 2015
Contact and exchange of fire in Manyuli, no casualties but a 303 rifle recovered.

April 22nd 2015
Raid carried out on "Magura" syndicate whilst infiltrating. Arrests effected on entire team of four with recovery of 303 rifle.

April 23rd 2015
Intel from "Magura" arrests led to the arrest of "Mark Neberi" who was third on our priority list.

June 23rd 2015
"Jabu" syndicate shot and killed an elephant in the park on the late afternoon of the 22nd June. Sting operation produced 20kg tusks and an arrest. Further information led to the arrest of team members.

July 23rd 2015
Escapees from the February contact arrested and two 303 rifles recovered.

October 22nd 2015
"Mapani" second on our priority list finally cornered with seven tusks one 303 rifle and one 450 watts. His accomplice and partner "Malalanzi" could not be implicated in this arrest, remains monitored and in second place on our priority list. 375 rifle they were using has been "located" and is being monitored for uplift.

FUTURE OPERATIONS
Future operations will continue in the Omay communal land, the hard hitting unit has had a serious effect on poaching syndicates. The informant network has reduced the "safety" factor for the syndicates. We are able to reach right into their homes and they have no secure areas to operate in.

The community outreach via the chiefs seems to be having an effect. Chief Negande has issued an order that anyone assisting poaching syndicates will be banished from the Omay. The subsequent banishing of two of his subjects over the last month has sent a very strong message about how serious he has become!

The upsurge in armed Zambian incursions in the lower Zambezi has us concerned with intel coming in of Zambian teams planning to operate here. The Cyanide is our major concern. Having only picked up poisoned fruit in July with no further cyanide incidents we were fairly relaxed about it. Subsequent to the MAPP arrest of the "Kariba" cyanide team, one of their members who escaped prosecution has been into our area. I am currently running a campaign in the community educating them of this problem. It is finally dawning on people that these elephant poachers will poison water sources that will not only kill elephant, but their livestock and families are at risk to.

As always, funding these operations and supplies of material are a constant battle. Carbon Green and Ume River Conservancy face the brunt of this funding with perpetual short falls. We rely on cell phones for communications, which is erratic at best! Firearms and ammunition have been supplied by me personally, again we are short if all members are in field. The idea of us tackling these teams with catapults and axes sounds ludicrous but is whats happening! So we are perpetually looking for help keeping the ball rolling.

Chris Moore
Ume River Conservancy
13th November 2015
+263 773 211772
chrismoore.saf@gmail.com
 
A Safe Destination?

The above question is one that is asked by many potential Safari clients, no matter which country in Africa is being considered for a safari. Zimbabwe outfitters and agents are especially reassuring clients, both potential and those already booked, that Zimbabwe really is a safe travel destination. As one of that country's largest safari operators, Martin Pieters Safaris is certainly in a position to address that question. With both the company owners and the majority of our professional hunters and their families living in Bulawayo, we know far better than overseas journalists the exact state of affairs in Zimbabwe.

Here are some facts that will help put your mind at ease:

No safari company in Zimbabwe books more dangerous game safaris than Martin Pieters Safaris, and not a single security issue has been raised to date.
Upon arrival in the country you will be met by either a Martin Pieters Safaris representative or by one of the reliable and responsible pilots who will be flying your charter in to camp. After your luggage is collected and firearms permit secured, you will either be taken through to the charter aircraft by the pilot, or depending on your arrival time, our Martin Pieters Safaris rep will drive you 20 minutes into Bulawayo to one of a number of comfortable B&B lodges where you can relax until your flight to camp the next morning. The next morning, you will be escorted back to the airport where you will meet your pilot for your charter flight into the valley.
There are no roadblocks to deal with, no long travel by vehicle through urban areas, or any stage of travel that finds the Martin Pieters Safaris client unsupervised.
Once the client arrives in our Zambezi safari areas, the only Africans you will come into contact with work for Martin Pieters Safaris or Zimbabwe National Parks Department, or a few local villagers from the CAMPFIRE area.
They are friendly and professional, they are exceptionally happy to have you there as you represent their livelihood.
Our concessions are incredibly remote and far removed from the closest urban areas. Zimbabwe certainly has its share of problems with well chronicled and deteriorating economic situations.
The good news is that the government understands the importance of foreign exchange brought into the country as a direct result of safari hunting. Martin Pieters Safaris one of the largest sources of revenue for the Nyaminyami Rural District Council, who oversee the largest CAMPFIRE area in Zimbabwe and we have an excellent relationship with the governing board of this important department.
The government has taken great care to ensure the safari business, and the safari operators responsible for the money coming into the country, are treated respectfully and not subject to government interference.
Zimbabwe needs the safari industry, and continues to take great pains to maintain good relations with its various operators.
There are absolutely no records of problems with security due to unrest in big game safari areas. If that situation should change, the client will not have to contact their agent or Martin Pieters Safaris, WE WILL CONTACT THE CLIENT!
No safari operator will ever send a client into an area with the potential for problems. End of story.
Each year our office handles an incredible number of calls from clients who are booked with us and are in a panic about a blurb in the paper, a story on TV, or a re-release of a State Dept.warning. Please understand that no one has a better finger on the pulse of Zimbabwe than we do. Our owners, staff, and their families live there and know immediately of all government decisions and/or political situation.
Yes, the population is suffering under the heavy hand of the current government, but that fact in no way affects your safari. Some may ask “How can you support this government with your business? ” Our response is “Money spent on safari is crucial to the survival of Zimbabwe’s wildlife. Pull the financial plug and Zimbabwe will quickly be as stripped of wildlife as Kenya”.

Look forward to your safari, and be assured that should a problem or situation arise that you need to be aware of; our office will immediately contact you to discuss the situation.

If you need any further reassurance please do hesitate to contact us.
 
Get in Shape

Your African Safari will require you to be able to walk sometimes 5-6 hours, for up to 8- 10 miles if hunting Cape buffalo and they are motivated. Temperatures will be in the mid 70s to mid 80s. The terrain in the Omay varies from flat ground to rolling hills with an occasional mountain to climb. A typical hunting day can be quite long, as you leave camp before the sun is up and return after it has set. Most Safaris are from 10-21 days in length.

Are you in the proper physical condition for this trip? The answer is most likely ‘no’, if you are like most of us! This should not concern the average client as most hunters who enjoy the outdoors maintain a reasonable level of fitness throughout the season. This said, you will require some conditioning before departure on your Safari.

The main exercise that you should be focusing on is walking. Start off by buying a good quality pair of hunting/walking shoes, the ones you plan on wearing during the Safari. Buy your shoes now, not the week before your safari. Any of the hiking type, over the ankle is fine. The important thing is to buy a pair that is lightweight, quiet, and comfortable, with soft rubber soles.
This done, set aside a schedule that allows you to walk for at least an hour every day, for a minimum of 5 days per week. Walk as rapidly as you are able, but at a comfortable pace. By the time you leave for your Safari, you should to be able to walk for a minimum of 5 miles. At the end of your walk, you should be able to be in good enough condition to make a shot, if need be. Now, to simulate the Safari, mix in some slow jogging with your walk.

Each Safari is a once in a lifetime experience that will be greatly enhanced if you are in reasonably good physical condition. Also, your chances of collecting top quality trophies if you are in good physical shape are much higher.

Take the time now to get into the best physical condition for your safari!
 
Martin Pieters 2017 Promo

A collection of some of the adventures for the 2016 hunting season with Martin Pieters Safaris

 
Some of our past seasons pics

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Big Game Hunting In Zimbabwe……Making A Difference To Communities


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Hunting in Zimbabwe

When you think of Africa, what comes to your mind……lush plains,flowing rivers,animal migrations……big cats, safari lodges and kitted game drive vehicles, visions conjured up by numerous wildlife documentaries, dvd’s showing exclusive photographic safaris with discerning clientele being pampered by attentive staff…….yes the scenes shown to us make us believe that all is well in Africa. Thats all very well, but realistically, Africa is not all about the above, there are many, many areas that have limited land use options, this is based on rainfall, wildlife numbers, accessibility and terrain. Most of these ‘ forgotten areas ‘ are not good enough for the photographic companies, no one wants to invest in the unknown, return on investment would be negative……, so what happens……

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Enter the safari operator,professional hunter and dedicated wildlife enthusiast……the client. Countless millions of dollars are poured into these areas annually throughout Africa by true conservationists, people who care about the preservation of our species for future generations. One such area ( and there are many ) is the Omay, Nyaminyami RDC, operated by Martin Pieters Safaris, www.martinpieterssafaris.com

For many years we have poured hunters dollars into this remote area, educating communities, conducting anti poaching actives, reintroduction and relocation of wildlife , construction of clinics and schools…… 9 years down the road, what do we have…….an area renowned for big game, a community that is happy and a generation that focuses on wildlife conservation and not poaching activities.


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In 2014, African conservancies was born and plans for the Ume River Conservancy were laid on the table, further cementing the relationship between dedicated safari operators and the community, allowing them to be directly involved in wildlife based decisions. Plans are currently underway with approval from local government to create a large remote conservancy where sustainable off take of certain species will form the back bone of wildlife conservation. 2 years down the road, we are already seeing the results as populations of several species are increasing whilst poaching activities are decreasing.

There is a lot to be done, but by taking these positive steps, by involving the local residents, by making use of these ‘ remote and forgotten areas ‘, areas that are unsuitable for the typical pampered photo safari enthusiast……we will continue to turn them into areas teeming with wildlife, an area to be proud of……thank you to our hunters.

Next time you are stuck in traffic, have a delayed flight or are shovelling snow off your porch…..close your eyes, dream of Africa, there is no better time to come hunting in Zimbabwe than today.

Our efforts today will be enjoyed by our children of tomorrow.
 
Extreme Huntress Jackie Gross Hunts Cape Buffalo with Martin Pieters Safaris

2012 Extreme Huntress™ contest winner Jackie Gross heads to Zimbabwe to hunt the black death (cape buffalo) with Martin Pieters Safaris. She also hunts a variety of plains game along the shore of Lake Kariba in the Omay CAMPFIRE area.

 
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Sustainable Off Take Benefiting Communities

Sustainable off take

Since 2007 we have been involved in dedicated wildlife conservation through sustainable off take, quota control, anti poaching and community based wildlife education in the Omay campfire concession.

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The Omay (NyamiNyami RDC ) is a vast ( 2 million acres) populated communal land which one of the first areas to be given the CAMPFIRE status, whereby local communities benefit from wildlife off take, it is not rocket science that this program works as we continue to see an increase in wildlife numbers in our area. Communities receive direct benefit both financially and through various projects implemented by Martin Pieters safaris such as clinics, schools, vehicles for anti poaching and the employment of scouts. It must be noted that the Nyaminyami RDC is a remote inhospitable concession that has no other land use model due to very erratic and low rainfalls, an abundance of mosquitos, tsetse flies and poor soils. The only benefit local people have, is to receive financial remuneration from hunting safari off take and employment.

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We at Martin Pieters safaris, www.martinpieterssafaris.com employ locals in all our camps as well as a dedicated anti poaching team that works alongside the RDC (council ), national parks, the police and the MAPP ( Matusadonna anti poaching project ), we continue to collect snares, arrest poachers and follow up on convictions and more importantly, educate people on the long term sustainable use of our national heritage. This method has been proven and several past poachers have turned tables and are now our most trusted wildlife officers, using their past notorious skills to help us protect our wildlife.

Every year several local villagers are killed or maimed by elephant, lion, buffalo, hippo and crocodile, they live in close proximity to these animals and only tolerate them because we as a hunting company give back to the community. It is very important for the protection of our wildlife in these remote areas that we continue to assist the RDC with anti poaching, continue to pay for the sustainable off take of a select quota, because if we do not, the locals will kill every animal, they will not tolerate wildlife disruptions to their families, be it through the destruction of their crops on an annual basis, or the loss of one of their family members.

Our wildlife populations are on the rise, we border the Matusadonna national park, there are no fences to stop animals movements, we are very much needed, even more so now with current rainfall patterns at their lowest, poaching will increase as people find it difficult to grow crops, we will not let the last 10 years of effort to protect our wildlife be a waste, we will not leave these villagers high and dry with no form of income or food.

We thank our hunters for their continued support. It is because of you that our conservation methods are successful.

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We spend in excess of $ 40 000 / annum on anti poaching

We have collected over 15 000 wire snares since 2007 saving thousands of animals.

We assist in arrests of subsistence poachers and heavily armed elephant poachers, we follow up with convictions so that these men and women can be put away and our animals will be safe.

We monitor game movements and patterns and adjust our quotas accordingly so that we continually have an increase for future generations

We have assisted in the construction of clinics, schools and information centers.

We employ over 30 locals in our camps and in the field thus as siting hundreds of locus through indirect benefits.

Last but not else, we pay over $ 200 000 in direct benefits annually to the RDC and the local wards for wildlife off take.
 
Buffalo hunting in Zimbabwe
One of the most amazing feelings you can get as a hunter is to be crawling on your hands and knees a mere 30 yards from a large herd of feeding buffalo, the dust gives you cover and the noise that comes 1200 pounding feet drowns out your movements. Ever wary, the lead cow often pauses for long motionless moments, staring intently from where they have come from, ever alert for the possible presence of danger.

As one, the herd feeds upwind, making their way slowly towards the sweet water and grass covered banks of lake Kariba.

Often the old bulls follow at a distance, signally or in groups of dagga boys, these massive hard bossed bulls bring up the rear and are always ready to protect the herd should predators try their luck. Buffalo hunting has always been one of the most challenging of the big 5 but despite this, it has been and remains the most sought after big game trophy in Africa. Buffalo hunting in Zimbabwe is conducted on private land and in large big game concessions from the south of Zimbabwe to the Zambezi Valley. Martin Pieters Safaris has a 2 million acres remote, rugged concession in the Zambezi valley and a big game paradise in the famous Matetsi area near Victoria falls and can boast some of the most intense, challenging and rewarding buffalo hunting in Zimbabwe today.

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Martin Pieters safaris offers short buffalo hunts and combination buffalo and leopard and buffalo and lion and can tailor make a safari package to suit your requirements. Our most popular safari is the 10 day buffalo and plains game safari where we offer a buffalo hunt in our Zambezi valley concession and plains game in our game rich area in the south of Zimbabwe. These combo packages have become extremely sought after and highly successful.

When you are ready to experience the thrill of the hunt, ready to test yourself against the cunningness of the cape buffalo, ready to face your adversary.

When it comes to heart pounding action, nothing compares to buffalo hunting in Zimbabwe.
 
Some of of our latest hunts

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Zimbabwe Hunting

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There are several reasons why Zimbabwe is rated as one of the top destinations for big game hunting in Africa, some of them being the massive free range areas and the strict sustainable quotas, others being the dedicated and highly experienced professional hunters. Martin Pieters safaris has been one of the leaders in Zimbabwe hunting safaris over the last decade and we are proud to be recognised by our peers in the industry as long standing ethical safari operators. Having hunted the Omay since 1994, we have first hand knowledge of wildlife populations and game movements. Our dedicated anti poaching scouts spend countless hours protecting our valuable heritage, their tireless work has made the Omay a premier destination for Zimbabwe hunting.

Our 2 million acre zambezi valley concession, the Omay is one of Zimbabwe’s gems.

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Nestled in the Zambezi valley, on the shores of one of the largest man made lakes in the world, lake Kariba, lies the Omay hunting concession. The rugged foothills of the Zambezi valley escarpment form a formidable backdrop to some of the most awe inspiring terrain on this continent. Rated as ‘ the destination’ for free range wild dangerous game hunting safaris in Zimbabwe, the Omay offers some of the best leopard and buffalo hunting at some of the most affordable rates.

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With one of the highest success rates on leopard in Zimbabwe, huge crocodile and massive hippo populations, along with big maned lion and large herds of buffalo, there is no better area for your next Zimbabwe hunting safari. We constantly strive for perfection, with recently refurbished camps, top quality equipment and several of the finest professional hunters Zimbabwe has to offer hunters.

Forget about fences, forget about work, lose yourself amongst the mopane trees, embrace wild remote Africa whilst you still can…..before it’s gone.
 
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Nyaminyami And Martin Pieters Safaris

The Kariba Legend

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“The BaTonga People have lived in the zambezi valley for centuries in peaceful seclusion and with little contact with the outside world. They were simple folk who built their houses along the banks of the great river and believed that their gods looked after them supplying them with water and food.

The name Kariba comes from the word Kariva or karinga, meaning trap, which refers to a rock jutting out from the gorge where the dam wall was to be built. It was believed by the BaTonga to be the home of Nyaminyami, the river god, and they believed anyone who ventured near the rock was dragged down to spend eternity under the water.

Reluctantly they allowed themselves to be resettled higher up the bank, but they believed Nyaminyami would never allow the dam to be built and eventually, when the project failed, they would move back to their homes.

In 1957, when the dam was well on its way to completion, Nyaminyami struck. The worst floods ever known on the Zambezi washed away much of the partly built dam and the heavy equipment, killing many of the workers.

Some of those killed were white men whose bodies disappeared mysteriously, and after an extensive search failed to find them, Tonga elders were asked to assist as their tribesmen knew the river better than anyone. The elders explained Nyaminyami had caused the disaster and in order to appease his wrath a sacrifice should be made.

They weren’t taken seriously, but, in desperation, when relatives of the missing workers were due to arrive to claim the bodies of their loved ones, the search party agreed in the hope that the tribesmen would know where the bodies were likely to have been washed to.

A Black calf was slaughtered and floated on the river. The next morning the calf was gone and the workers’ bodies were in its place. The disappearance of the calf holds no mystery in the crocodile infested river, but the reappearance of the workers’ bodies three days after they had disappeared has never been satisfactorily explained.

After the disaster, flow patterns of the river were studied to ascertain whether there was a likelihood of another flood and it was agreed a flood of comparable intensity would only occur once every thousand years.

The very next rainy season, however, brought further floods even worse than the previous year. Nyaminyami had struck again, destroying the coffer dam, the access bridge and parts of the main wall.

The project survived and the great river was eventually controlled. In 1960 the generators were switched on and have been supplying electricity to Zimbabwe and Zambia ever since.

The BaTonga still live on the shores of Lake Kariba, and many still believe one day Nyaminyami will fulfill his promise and they will be able to return to their homes on the banks of the river. They believe Nyaminyami and his wife were separated by the wall across the river, and the frequent earth tremors felt in the area since the wall was built are caused by the spirit trying to reach his wife, and one day he will destroy the dam.

Martin Pieters Safaris and Nyaminyami

Having hunted the NyamiNyami ( Omay ) concession for the better part of the last 25 years, I have learnt, erred and been taught how to hunt! From experience which has been gleamed from hunting several major concessions and conservancies in Zimbabwe, along with 10 years hunting the Chobe and Okavango in Botswana, I believe that the essence of a TRUE hunt comes in the form of the experience gained from hunting a wild, remote and natural concession, the Omay, or Nyaminyami is one such block.

Aching muscles, blistering heat and parched lips and are what make an African hunt, we shy away from fenced stocked ranches, we pride ourselves in offering a real safari, where the only guarantee we make is that you will hunt, you will make memories, you will learn and you will look back at your time in the Zambezi valley as one of ‘ the highlights’ of your hunting career. Quality camps situated on lake kariba and in the escarpment allow you to explore the entire 2 million acres we have to offer. Legendary professional hunters who have all cut their teeth in the jesse, first class equipment coupled with Zimbabwes’ amazing trackers and staff make Martin Pieters safaris your next choice for a quality affordable safari in Zimbabwe.

The Zambezi Valley offers the true big game hunter the chance to hunt up close and personal with Africa’s dangerous game, from elephant bulls to tuskless cows, from large herds of buffalo to solitary dagga boys, we offer combination safaris for lion, leopard, crocodile, hippo, sable and an array of plains game all found in one concession making it hunt of a lifetime.

Its not only a hunt……..its an adventure.
 

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Spain, i booked through a consultant, i book almost everything through him now and he's done me right. his contact 724 986 7206 if interested and he will have more info to share,
I hunted elephant with Luke Samaris in 2005. It was my fourth safari and I tell you he is a fine gentleman the best. I got the opportunity to meet Patty Curtis, although never hunted with him but enjoyed our conversation around our tent in the Selous. Very sad for a tough guy to leave this world the way he did. Let’s pray the murderers are caught. I hope to see Luke in Nashville.
 
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