CZ 550 9.3x62 second recoil lug?

Discussion in 'Up To .375' started by kayaker, May 5, 2019.

  1. kayaker

    kayaker New Member

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    Hi all.

    I just replaced the full length stock on my CZ 550 FS 9.3x62 with an older CZ 550 American stock, also from a 9.3x62.


    The CZ's use a second under barrel recoil lug dovetailed into the barrel. CZ obviously changed the location of the lug as the 'new' stock has the lug recess a bit further back so I had to remove the second under-barrel to get it to work (just slides out). The rest fits well.


    The stock as a steel recoil lug plate and 2 cross bolts. The CZ action also has a large recoil lug, bigger than a M98.


    Is this second under-barrel lug really necessary on a 9.3x62? Many 9.3's don't have this feature, including M98 actioned rifles which have smaller recoil lugs than the CZ. 9.3x62 has fairly stiff recoil but its not a real hard kicking cartridge, as many of you know.


    Opinions? Has anyone else removed this second recoil lug (the aftermarket B&C stock that some people buy don't accommodate the second under barrel lug).


    Thanks
     

  2. Bren7X64

    Bren7X64 AH Member

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    I can't really talk about the CZ rifles, but I can talk about the elder brother - the Brno ZKK60x series.

    I have 4 of these rebarelled to various calibres - 2 x 601s converted to 7x57 and .260 Rem, a .375H&H in 602 and a 600 in 9.3x62.

    ALL of these have been stocked without the front lug. The 7x57 and 375 are in other stocks so they may not count - but the 9.3 and the .260 are back in Brno stocks where they came from and are showing no adverse effects.

    I admit I have only fired about 250 rounds out of the 9.3, but there are no indications that it's coming to harm - and it shoots acceptably at 100m - about 1.5" with an old Weaver K2.5 on it.
     

  3. cmk

    cmk AH Veteran

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    No Brno experience either, but my Sako 9.3x62 doesn't even have a cross-bolt, just a loose recoil lug (held in place by the front action screw - see picture link below) that fits into a recess in the wood. I was a bit surprised at this, as it kicks more than just a little, but the stock doesn't seem to have started cracking yet.

    https://www.usedguns.com.au/pics/1-106560-2017-07-24_10-07-51-AM.jpg

    /cmk
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 17, 2019

  4. Jeffrey

    Jeffrey AH Senior Member

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    So I had a specific conversation about this with the owner of Triple River Gunsmithing. MY 550 in 9.3 came from the factory with the Kevlar B&C stock and NO barrel mounted recoil lug. Apparently they aren’t necessary on a 9.3. So if I want to get that factory walnut stock, I’ll have to go with fake cross bolts I guess.
     

  5. kayaker

    kayaker New Member

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    Thanks all,

    As I suspected. I mean Tikka has one single lug and its small and not very robust. I was sanding out the barrel channel on the new stock and the recoil lug surface in the stock has a substantial steel plate on it and 2 cross bolts. I am sure it will be quite fine! Thanks
     

  6. bruce moulds

    bruce moulds AH Fanatic

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    good walnut or synthetic stocks will minimize the need for barrel recoil lugs on rifles up to and including 375 h&h.
    the problem with these lugs is that to do what they need to do, they should contact the stock on their rear face, with clearance on the sides and bottom.
    this means that when (not if) the forend moves, the point of impact also moves.
    it also means that resting the forend on something hard will move the point of impact away from the rest.
    which brings us to tolerance stacking.
    these point of impact moves can be of the magnitude of 1 moa
    go back to 200 yds and that could make the shot 2" high.
    then add 1 moa shooter error, another 2" high = 4" high.
    then if the shot is high in the group of a 1 moa rifle, another 1" high and we are up to a total of 5" high on a reasonably good shot.
    float the barrel and this goes back to 3" high, far more acceptable.
    on a dangerous game rifle this is a non issue, due to shorter distances.
    it does however suggest that a rifle a little more powerful is better than one of border line power.
    the trend to cut costs on modern rifles with bolt on or dovetailed recoil lugs is worrying when considering tolerance stacking, grouping consistently, and holding zero.
    bruce.
     

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