Trip Cancellation/Interruption Insurance, Emergency Medical/Dental Coverage & More...

Fishing? Are You Prepared?​


Global Rescue — Spirit of Adventure​

 
I've bought Global Rescue at least three times and thankfully, I've never had to use it.



However, I was not impressed in the least with the company they partner with for "travel insurance".

They did everything they could NOT to pay my claim in 2020 because of Covid. There was, literally, no possible way for me to get to Africa to go on a hunt. They declared that the worldwide pandemic of Covid was NOT a natural disaster, and, therefore, would not be covered.

(And I never saw a team of their EXPERTS making a stand that the virus was created in a lab in Wuhan, China to prove that it was not a natural disaster).


Delta Airlines made it right.
Airlinks/SA Airlines made it right, through not responding to my credit card dispute.



I continued to use Global Rescue for my latest hunt, because I believed them to be the best at actually rescuing someone in a remote location. Heck, you can even opt for a team of mercenaries, if you think you might need them.

But, (IMO) don't buy their travel insurance.


My mother died during the timeframe of my claim, so their travel insurance company (reluctantly and with a great deal of hassle) ultimately paid, but I had to get outside parties involved.


In my opinion, Global Rescue should partner with a much better travel insurance company, then they could OWN the adventure travel market.
 
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Being able to communicate in an emergency is crucial — especially in the backcountry. To do this, a two-way communication device is essential if you have an emergency off the grid. For example, when the SOS button is activated on a ZOLEO Device, Global Rescue receives the emergency notification directly and can begin serving you.

Besides carrying a device, what else can you do to make sure you're 'rescue ready'?

Share Your Plans - maybe via text or email so memory lapses aren't an issue.

️ Provide Details Within Those Plans - where are you starting, what route are you taking to get to your destination, and how long do you expect it to take you?

⏲️ Have Information Ready - in case of an emergency you want to make sure you also give as much information to your rescue operation professional. Think about things beyond where you are, who you are, and how you got into that situation. What does the overall situation look like? What do you need right this moment?
 
Expert Tips For An Unplanned Overnight Airport Layover
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Will a flight cancellation strand you overnight at an airport? How do you make the best of an unplanned overnight airport layover? Can you get a sleep pod? How do you protect your valuables if you fall asleep? What can you do to flip a nightmarish layover into a manageable inconvenience?

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation airlines cancelled 1.7% of domestic U.S. flights over the first three months of 2023. While that is much lower than the 2.7% flight cancellation rate for all of 2022, it still leaves nearly 30,000 aircraft on the tarmac due to cancellation.

Inclement weather, airline industry staffing shortages, hurricanes, tornados, mechanical repair issues, volcanic ash, brushfire particulate, and reduced flight schedules caused massive flight cancellations during 2022. Most of these same issues remain except staffing improved and flight schedules are increasing. The combination of those two factors, plus a relatively smooth springtime air travel season, is prompting experts to predict things will get better for air travelers in 2023.

“Most airlines handled the recent surge in spring break travelers relatively well, and the cancellation rate so far this year is down significantly from last year,” according to an NPR report.

[Related Reading: The Ultimate World Travel Safety Kit]

Hopefully, the weather, mechanical jet repairs, natural disasters, or changing connection schedules don’t lead to a flight cancellation potentially forcing you into an overnight layover at the airport, especially if a hotel room is unavailable. But they could. So, we asked our Global Rescue travel risk experts and our members – both of whom are among the world’s most experienced travelers – for their tips, tricks, and hacks on how to make it through an overnight airport layover.
“I once got stuck in an airport overnight and spent a night on the chair and was freezing,” said Dianette Wells, a longtime Global Rescue member and world travel adventurer. “Now, I always pack a wrap because it’s lightweight, and travels well, I can use it as a blanket when it’s chilly or you can even ball it up for a pillow.”

Reconnaissance and Preparation

“I was at the Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris facing a flight delay. No one knew how long it would be. I found a sleeping pod to use,” said Meghan Mahoney, a Global Rescue director, and avid international traveler. The pod had a bed, desk and chair, and a noise cancellation system. “It was totally private so I could nap in comfort or work. And since I was still at the airport, I could regularly check flight status. Thankfully, I didn’t have an overnight delay, but the pod was worth every penny for the several hours I needed,” she said.

  • Check for airport lounges or sleeping pods that you can rent for the night or a few hours. Some offer nap seats with a cover while larger pods include a bed, a workspace, a private bathroom, and a TV. Pod options vary by airport. London Heathrow Airport has YotelAir, the Seoul Incheon Airport has Nap Zones, Helsinki Vantaa Airport has GoSleep pods, and Munich Airport features NapCabs. There are nine U.S. airports that use Minute Suites.
  • Look for 24-hour restaurants or cafes where you can grab a bite to eat and pass the time.
  • Get snacks and water to stay hydrated before the airport shops close if you don’t already have these items.
  • Fully charge your electronic devices so you can use them throughout the overnight layover. Keep an eye on power sources in case you need to recharge during the night.
  • Keep your toothbrush and toothpaste handy, as well as a travel-size bottle of moisturizer or lotion.
  • Protect your valuables, especially if you are traveling alone. Put your valuables in your pockets or in a purse or backpack slung across your shoulder. Pull other items as close as possible and put your arm or leg through a strap. It’s not as secure as keeping a waking eye on everything, but it will make you feel better and help you relax. “I carry a daypack with my valuables and use that as a pillow. Money and my passport I keep in a waist pouch or neck pouch under my shirt. If you are planning to sleep, set an alarm just so you don’t accidentally oversleep,” said high-altitude climbing legend and Global Rescue Mountain Advisory Council member Ed Viesturs.
Avoid Boredom

“I relied on Spotify Premium to get unlimited listening for music and podcasts when I’ve been stuck at Boston Logan and Glasgow International Airports,” said Rett Carpenter, Global Rescue enterprise sales manager.

  • Using mobile apps to download content will help you dodge boredom during a long airport layover or delay. The Oodles app is free and has thousands of books and audiobooks. Spotify Premium is a digital music service that gives you access to millions of songs without ads. The Netflix mobile app gives you access to TV shows and movies from around the world.
  • Consider socializing with other stranded passengers to pass the time and make new friends.
  • Avoid sitting too long. Get up and take a lively walk for a few minutes every hour or less. Be certain to stretch. Fellow travelers might raise an eyebrow as you do light yoga or other stretches on the concourse, but you’ll feel more comfortable after stretching.
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Relax or Sleep

If buying a lounge day pass isn’t an option, find a quiet, but not isolated, place to sleep, suggested Charles McCarthy, a Global Rescue marketing manager and world traveler. “This may even mean moving to a different terminal. I got stuck at Hartsfield-Jackson in Atlanta overnight once. The domestic terminals were a zoo, even late into the evening. The international terminal during that time, however, was relatively quiet, and easy to get to,” he said.

  • Aim for rest and relaxation instead of hoping for eight solid hours of sleep. Make your goal to be as relaxed as possible and sleep will likely follow. If not, even the restful, quiet time will help you recharge. Set an alarm so you don’t oversleep.
  • Pack a sleep mask to block light.
  • Carry an in-ear or over-ear headset to cancel out external noise or play calming music.
  • Bring a comfortable travel pillow (inflatable or packable) and blanket to help you. Not everyone sleeps easily in a chair, so consider packing a compact, inflatable pool air mattress (less than $10) to keep in your carry-on bag. If you want to stretch out and the floor is the only place available, simply inflate and lie down on something comfier than the cold, hard terminal floor.
  • Carry extra undergarments and a soft exercise shirt in case you get stuck sleeping at the airport. It’s as close to pajamas as you may get and an easy way to tell your brain that it’s bedtime.
  • Keep a lightweight, insulated jacket in your luggage year-round. You can drape it over yourself like a blanket and a hood can help block out harsh airport light. Large pockets are perfect for securing valuables on your person while you snooze, and you can stuff the jacket into its own sleeve for a crude pillow.
“As a solo female traveler, I never cover more than one ear with a headphone so I can remain audibly aware of my surroundings. I also learned that some airports have free layover programs. I was stuck at the Incheon Airport in Seoul, South Korea, overnight and was able to do a free three-hour tour of the area first thing in the morning,” said Josie Daigle, the Global Rescue social media manager.

Flight disruptions and cancellations have many causes. Global Rescue members can access Global Rescue services directly from their smartphones using the My Global Rescue mobile app. Download the My Global Rescue app for Apple devices here and Android devices here, and find travel alerts by clicking on destination reports, selecting the country, and reviewing available alerts located at the top of the My Global Rescue app under “Events.”
 
Travel Intelligence Center

Global Rescue manages destination reports for 215 countries and principalities worldwide, putting up-to-date intel at your fingertips on everything from entry requirements, currency, and common scams to travel health and personal security advice.


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