What is the TRUE cost of my African Hunting Safari!

Discussion in 'Hunting Africa' started by Jaco Strauss, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

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    A trophy fee is a defined amount in some countries, in others it varies. In South Africa and Namibia you will see varying prices. Just don't gloss over the numbers, look into what you are getting for your money.
     
  2. ActionBob

    ActionBob AH Fanatic

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    Tiss;
    you can search the various outfitters and most have the fees on their web sites and there are many packages offered on this board. So pretty easy to compare costs and trophy fees, but takes time. I think you can go on a very nice hunt for about $10,000 with pictures, maybe a few mounts. And for $20,000 you can do a lot for one person. Or you can really go nuts!

    I can give you a quick general run down of our costs (they will still be coming in for another year, so some are estimates) from our first hunt, at least rounded off to the nearest few hundred dollars or so. This is for two of us, but there is some considerable economy of scale as we hunted together, one PH. My wife and I went and booked through an agent as it was our first time and the vacation of our lives so even though I wanted to shop for the best deal, my logical and sensible wife advised using a booking agent to help cover all the bases. We decided to spend what ever it took, within some reason. We have been pretty frugal but also took some big risks investing over the past 30 years, and now we can do this stuff, within reason.

    This may not apply to most, but we went shopping for new bolt guns (I had automatics, pumps and a lever gun) and scopes, 4 of them. And everything else such as spare eye glasses and sun glasses (prescription for me), clothing, rain jackets, luggage, soft and hard gun cases, binoculars, harnesses, slings, back packs, bug repellent, candy to treat the trackers, camera with spare memory cards, batteries, shooting sticks to practice off, ammo! for both practice and hunting, range fees, etc. etc. That was about $10-12,000 if I'm being honest... of course we now have those things.

    The package deal we started with was $6700 for a week and 5 nice trophies. We added two extra days and my wife. Then added 3 days of touring through the outfitter (expensive). That all was about $10,300 if I remember right. Then the plane tickets were about $4500 for the two of us with excess baggage and guns. Add $200 to pay a pro (Henry) to do the gun permits and meet us at the airport to walk us through the process (this felt like a bargain). We had a layover in Paris and went on a quick tour and out to eat, ~$300. Then rented a car and hotel rooms for 8 more days after the hunt on our own... About another $3000. During the hunt we shot an extra 10 animals, that and tips were another $10,400. Now we are getting taxidermy done, several pedestal mounts, one full, back skins, etc... by the time we have them home they will likely total about $14,000.

    We do not have a trophy room, so been pricing that, with the new house it's going to take to hold up the trophy room, the first bid was $650,000.... we are still working on that.

    So now I am absolutely hooked on Africa! But my wife has requirements that we do several other trips first. We will have to do at least one of those before we go back so add another ~$10,000 ...

    So by the time we get the first mounts hung in the trophy room and ready to book a second hunt in Africa, we will be into it for about $714,700.

    We should be young enough to have this cost us well over a million dollars before we are done.

    You might just want to quit while you are ahead and not even get started;)
     
  3. Bwannabe

    Bwannabe AH Member

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    Taking your fire arm to South Africa does not cost anything, you take it as checked luggage.

    My PH met us at the airport, we paid nothing for import fees on firearms.
    Have your 4778 on hand the ph will give you a letter of invitation and accompany you through the SAPS. They will issue the permit and and off you go.

    As for trophies and getting them mounted.

    Dip and pack is the cheaper way to go, bring them back to the USA, after all you earned the right to good quality mounts.

    What you can do with most taxidermist is one mount at a time, write up a contract.
    The dip and pack skins and horns come in, if they contain swine or primate they must go to a USDA approve facility. No big deal almost every tannery is approved int he USA, Let your taxidermist handle this, they know whats going on.

    The skins hit the USA, the taxidermist and the agents, I.e. Coppersmiths, Flora Fauna, etc) can contact the taxidermist, who will tell them where the shipment can go.

    You will have some fees, air freight, ground transportation to the tannery, then the taxidermist and tannery take over.

    Now you will have some tanning fees, not a big deal, way cheaper than airfare or ship freight to get a couple huge crates to the USA.

    Once the hides are to the taxidermist from the tannery, you can do one mount a month or every two months. the taxidermist will normally work with you on this.

    If you shop around you will find in most case the prices are very comprable to the shops in Africa and yes, many American taxidermist know the animals just as well as anyone in Africa and have access to better quality forms. and the components to mount them. (some of the paper mache used in Africa is loaded with Asbestos).

    Your taxidermist in the USA will normally store your tanned hides in a deep freeze, this helps over the course of time for the hides.

    I just returned from South Africa, I used a shop in Baltimore, Limpopo for my Dip and Pack, its about half price of the large shops in Pretoria or Joberg.

    Being a taxidermist and knowing the cost to produce a good mount, I can assure you my mounts will not be done any faster than a customers. Maybe not as fast.

    Now let me ask you a very simple question. It has happened several times.

    If your mounts are done in Africa, what recourse do you have if they are piss poor quality?
    NONE!


    In every area of the USA are some award winning taxidermist. What does this mean to you? Tell them you want their best work!! Look at their work, look at the awards they have won. Do they use clients mounts for competition? If they do then this is the taxidermist for you.

    Should your mount not be up to par then you have recourse and can work things out!!

    If you have any questions call me 870-435-3337 or email at taxidermist118@hotmail.com
    Being a member of the National Taxidermist Assoc. Board of Directors, and State Taxidermist assoc Board of directors I have seen good and bad on both sides of the pond.


    Your prices for mounts will vary, but still can be very affordable here int he USA.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2014
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  4. BRICKBURN

    BRICKBURN SUPER MODERATOR CONTRIBUTOR GOLD BENEFACTOR AH Ambassador

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    First, before you become overwhelmed slow down. You have time.
    Get an old mayonnaise jar and start throwing money in it NOW. Does not matter, out something in it.

    1. Have an idea of the species you want to hunt.
    2. What other things do you want to see besides the hunt?
    3. Go to the hunts offered section AH and do some review and comparison of the offers.
    4. Go to some Outfitter websites and look at price lists and see what the day rates, trophy fees and packages might be.
    A package is a set number of trophies and days. Typically, all in.
    5. Read some hunt reports.
    6. Review how the PH or Outfitter interacts. In the hunt report, on the phone, on this forum.


    An Outfitter or Agent can provide you with the concept of a budget.

    Depends on how you book or with whom.
    At booking, typically 50% day rates.
    Before you arrive the last 50%.
    Trophy Fees on departure
    Taxidermy, deposit before work starts. usually, after you arrive home.
    Trophy shipping. It will be a while. So, you'll have a chance to save.

    All of these costs are usually in your day rates. Refer to question 2 above.

    Fair is up to you. That is what all the work is about in reading on this site.
    Which is the best apple? What's a fair price?
    You can't sell me a MacIntosh but I'll buy a Gala.

    If you want to hunt a rare species it will cost more.
    There are sliding scale trophy fees (depending on size) at some outfits.

    Look at some price lists from the various outfitters and you will see a norm show up.
    Make sure you are not just looking at the dollar.
    A tent thrown up on the lawn is quite different from a five star lodge.


    Air fare can be between $1600 and $3000 depending where you live. Off season will be cheaper.
    Ask Lori!!!

    Direct from the US to RSA = ZERO firearms permit fees.
    Some airlines charge firearms handling fees. So choose your route and carrier with caution.
    Some European countries/cities are charging firearms transit fees now. i.e.. Frankfurt

    Talk is free. Booking costs.
    Outfitters are the folks who actually organize the hunt.
    PH's are the guys guiding you.
    You can have folks that are both Outfitter and PH.
    Agents can be the folks that will help you book a hunt.

    Outfitters and PH's are licensed. Agents are not.

    Have fun reading.
     
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  5. Code4

    Code4 AH Enthusiast

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    Back to the OP.
    For an entry level PG hunt in SA or Namibia, all inclusive (I mean every cent) with one or two trophies and 3-4 culls you can do it for about $15K-$20K depending on extras.

    You can shave a few dollars here and there as you really don't need different equipment to what you use at home and can do a lot of the paper work and arrangements yourself.

    You could probably get a cull hunt and an awesome 'local' experience with a borrowed rifle for well under $10K all inclusive.

    Once you go 'great white hunter' it gets more expensive.
     
  6. ActionBob

    ActionBob AH Fanatic

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    All BS aside... Brickburn summed up well, concentrate on his message to start...

    If you look at the actuals I listed for our hunt, we had $25,400 into plane tickets, rifle permit guy, 9 days hunting plus 3 days touring (PE city, coast, port, history, township, Ado, Scotia), tips, and 15 trophy animals. For both of us. That is no equipment or ammo and no Taxidermy. And that was booked through James Jeffrey, with his person doing the plane tickets...

    Just doing a 10 day hunt (no tour) for one person, you could probably shave off $3-4000. Leave out the Eland and plug in a Wart Hog or Baboon, etc.... you are down to $20,000 with 15 animals or 1.5 per day of hunting. That might even get you pretty darn close to GWH status? (ok, a little BS stuck in there).
     
  7. lawrence_court

    lawrence_court AH Member

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    Interesting thread!

    Really hard to give 'ball park' figures and specifics due to the huge variables related to this topic: PG/DG/ranch/concession/species/days/charter flights etc.

    How about some General Rules for Hunting Safari Budgeting (just my thoughts and experiences from organising a few different hunts):

    1 - ALWAYS book with a reputable outfitter to ensure clarity, value and honesty of costing.
    2 - ONLY deposit once it is confirmed (in writing) that all costs/taxes have been quoted in full (excluding tips).
    3 - ADD 25% on top of the total safari cost (excluding all transport/taxidermy) for tips/unseen costs/emergency cash/extra trophies taken in a fit of excitement!
    4 - CONFIRM and calculate totals regarding taxidermist choice/prices/shipping/import and export fees/handling agent in Africa and home country.
    5 - ALWAYS be aware that costs related to government agencies may change significantly at any time after your deposit has been made: concession fees/govt permits etc.
    6 - NEVER book a safari that breaks/threatens to break your bank - have a good amount of reserve savings for unseen costs related to travel.

    If you have 'a boss at home' then......let's not go there....way too complicated!

    Somewhat like the constitution, rules 2-6 don't mean anything without rule 1......
     
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  8. Scott Slough

    Scott Slough AH Senior Member

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    Hard to put a cost on an addiction!
     
  9. Jaco Strauss

    Jaco Strauss AH Elite

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    any outfitter can provide a reasonably accurate estimate, this is no major ask.... quite simply put ask for one.....

    my best always
     
  10. CAustin

    CAustin AH Fanatic

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    That's just the way my outfitter has been on both hunts Jaco! I asked for the prices up front and reconfirmed before getting on the plane. There have been no hidden costs.....but then I have asked a lot of detailed questions and talked to several references. Watching this site and talking to people who have been on a safari will make the trip so much better because you will not have surprises.
    Action Bob says he is hooked on the Afrucan Safari and so am I. If a man works hard all his life and saves a few coins along the way you can do a great safari and not hurt your retirement. I tell anyone that you can save up enough money over the course of a couple or three years to do a beginners hunt even on a modest income. Planning makes all the difference in the world.
    Thank you for starting this thread Jaco as it will give the first timer hunter a lot to ponder and serve as a starting point for questions to ask up front......before you book the hunt!
     
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  11. ActionBob

    ActionBob AH Fanatic

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    Yea I was joking around about total cost.. well a little anyway;) And yes I am hooked! I waited so long to go on my first Safari that we had plenty saved up for any contingency that came up. So financially we were fully prepared... However I should have (and could have) gone a least a few years sooner.

    I was serious on the second post, those are real numbers. I have since then become convinced there are enough good deals floating around that one can do a great first hunt for a lot less. Certainly for $10,000, without taxidermy.

    I am very excited about African hunts in general and the whole safari experience and even the other African experiences. It is one of those things that has to be experienced to fully understand.... Like seeing the Grand Canyon or the Giant Red Wood trees, even seeing the ocean the first time (maybe I am easily impressed) ... I can tell you about it but you will not really understand until you see/experience it for yourself.

    Having said all that; My best advise is to be financially responsible first. If your young and single and probably going to spend your money on a new fancy car you don't need or the latest soon to be obsolete electronics anyway.. Do it!... Don't go on safari. Seriously, you will become hooked and stay broke the rest of your life going on one safari after another.. You may never get married and be able to have kids (well, legitimate ones anyway). You might be doomed to bouncing from one hot looking woman to another as you enthrall them with tales of adventure until they come to realize that you will never be able to settle down and become a good provider and family man, and they dump you ... It could ruin your life! Buy something that will break and be a complete waste so you learn and start investing sensibly... Then go on safari after you have provided for your family, secured your retirement and become financially secure...... Or on the other hand, take off for Africa at age 19 and become another Frederick Courteney Selous.

    P.S. Keep in mind this advise is probably worth what you are paying for it. LMFAO
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2014
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  12. ActionBob

    ActionBob AH Fanatic

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    Serious thoughts about how to go on a first African Hunting Safari on a budget;

    While keeping in mind all the sound advise of checking references and doing research, shop around for deals. They are popping up regularly. And watch for seasonal deals earlier or later than peak season. But ask lots of questions about weather and conditions.

    Unless you are an experienced World traveler AND comfortable traveling with guns and the bureaucracy associated with that (see rent a gun), DO NOT skimp on booking flights and using reputable agents to help with travel and gun issues.

    Get it out of your head that you are not going because you have to save up for specific and expensive animals... Start with the animals being offered in whatever package you decide on, then discuss with the outfitter what others can be added for what cost... You may be surprised the quality of animals that might be available.... In RSA at least (and I suspect Namibia and possibly other places) there are deals that pop up... A neighbor of your outfitter might have a surplus of something and have some bills to pay so may offer a deal... If your outfitter knows your interested and timing works, he may be able to lock something in for you. And some packages have choices... The first place I went when thinking about adding critters, was to what my wife wanted! This is the most important part of animal selection! Second place I went was to the list of choices the outfitter provided. Obviously I took the most expensive ones in the package.. Then I added all the rest of the options to my list. Finally find out what you don't know about. I had no idea Fallow Deer were available and would be rutting when we were there. So we added one as they were a decent deal. And I never gave any thought to Mountain reedbuck until I saw them and looked at cost and found them to be cheap and a great hunt in wonderful scenery.

    Use what you have. You do not need the latest camo or scent spray. A can of insect repellant might be good to have. And any drab or not bright clothing will do fine. Blue jeans and decent tennis shoes are likely all you need. Take what is recommended by your outfitter for the time of the year but not much else. Keep your luggage weight down, it cost us several hundred dollars in excess baggage charges. But we were staying in country and extra 11 days. On the hunt they will do laundry every day... You just don't need much clothes. Depending upon how good a shot you are, you don't need a lot of ammo but you do need good bullets. 2 boxes should be enough to sight in and harvest your critters, take 3 if you want but shouldn't need it. You do not need much of a pack, you need a top quality flashlight if you might be tracking a leopard at night... otherwise a $5 one is fine. A $10-$20 soft case is all you need. Take some candy (not stuff that melts) to share with the PH and tracker.

    Don't buy a gun! Unless you are a gun fanatic and that is a very important part of the experience to you. The gun you have and shoot well and is all you need as long as it is legal. An automatic of any kind is not. Don't get to hung up on the caliber, just ask a your outfitter if it is ok if you have doubts. If it is an odd caliber (but sufficient) talk to the outfitter to see if he can arrange to have an extra box of ammo on hand just in case your luggage gets lost, or a rental gun with ammo available. If you have to buy a new gun, consider a loaner as it will save a lot of hassle and expense traveling. And if you still "have" to buy a gun but are on a budget, there are plenty of low priced but high quality and accurate guns available... Something along the line of a Ruger American or any of the other brands in that category will be more than adequate. Spend as much or more on a scope but simple with good glass will do fine. The best reason to buy a gun if you don't have one is to practice with the gun you will use... only you can know how much you need this. If you are buying new, get it in a caliber common to Africa. Nothing wrong with a 270, 308, 30-06, 7mm rem mag, 300 win mag or a 7x57, if you can get ammo. Consider a 30-06 for low cost and available ammo.

    Taxidermy is going to be the biggest opportunity to save money. I'm getting everything mounted because I wanted to... But perhaps I should have heeded some advice I got to be more selective about that. You will get likely a couple great high ranking trophies, a couple that are not so much, and a lot of fine one right in the middle. It is not only expensive to have them done and shipped, it is also a challenge in many cases to find room for them. On the other hand, every time you look at them you will likely be reminded of the hunt and they can "take you back there".... I suggest that if your on a budget, think "outside the box". Flat skins, just the skulls, or cut the horns off and do something creative with them. If your at all handy, get them home and see what you can do. Have the hooves made into bookends or something on the larger species... Possibly in Africa. If your worried about taxidermy quality, have one or two or three shipped home to be mounted but have the rest of the work done over there. Cleaning skulls and making curios is a lot cheaper there. You can also budget about half of the taxidermy cost to be spread out several months or more.

    Take at least a good mid range pair of binoculars, or better. And a camera. If you cannot afford the high priced critters, maybe get one of those camera adaptors and a tripod for your binos to take long range pictures without the expensive lenses if you see something worth remembering but not in your budget to shoot.

    Consider only photos and no taxidermy on the ones you do shoot.... Have your PH bring a rag and water jug to wash the critters off and take time to pose them well. My wife was not a huge fan of having her gun in all the photos (she humored me on some) and our PH was so expert at cleaning and posing the trophies that my own mother commented to my wife that she was amazed at how tame the animals were to pose for the pictures... My wife gave her a puzzled look and exclaimed "they're dead!"
     
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  13. PHSC_Adriaan

    PHSC_Adriaan AH Senior Member

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    Great thread Jaco, good to see everyones comments and concerns and how as an Outfitter, to improve services offered.
     
  14. FairChase

    FairChase New Member

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    Another great thread I wish I would have read before my hunt.
    I agree with those that stated the total cost of an African safari can be less than other hunts such as an elk hunt in Canada. Plus, you have an opportunity to hunt multiple trophies in one trip! Check out an elk/bear/deer combo hunt in Canada or Alaska. I believe it is a realistic comparison.
     
  15. hunthardsafaris

    hunthardsafaris AH Enthusiast

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    Nice topic Jaco.
    There is unfortunatelly no easy answer or method to calculate all the variables on a safari. We at the moment book flights do import permits and meet with clients at least 3 to 4 times before they leave to go on safari and we give them advice based on our experiance. We also travel with the client 90% of the time. There are costs we cannot give the client based on their taxidermy needs at the time, they may decide to change a mount or two. We operate on transparecy and the client pays as per our agreement on paper.
    There has been a tendancy of late here in Europe that African Outfitters come market with ridicoulous package prices,then later the client gets billed for extras that clever wording hid in the agreement.
    Just something I have noticed with many first time hunters to Africa, they bring so much un needed kit that stays in the truck or camp most of the safari, take only the items you really need and save the money you would have spent on them for another trophy.
     
  16. JamesR

    JamesR New Member

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    A great topic Jaco

    As someone who is in the process of planning my first hunt it is good to get a feel for what it is normal to expect from a hunt and what others have experienced

    James
     
  17. Bsums

    Bsums AH Veteran

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    The cost of the actual hunt is well covered here. The other part I can touch on is the cost of what to bring and buy. If you don't have great rifles and don't want to go out and buy new fancy rifles, it is often cheaper just to rent rifles then to deal with the cost of importing them plus the risk of them being lost/stolen or damaged. Don't worry about spending a ton on clothing. I traveled with maybe 200$ of hunting clothes, two shirts, 1 shorts, 1 pants/zipper shorts, boots,belt, and hat. Then just two sets of leisure clothes, sneakers, and a fleece for at night/early morning. Stray away from fancy looking luggage as it looks more appealing to steal etc. I use an old olive duffle bag and a backpack. Its easy to go overboard but you will find you won't need much. Leave your fancy jewelry, watches, etc at home. Your phone is enough of a watch as your alarm clock is Good Morning, Sir! and the generator at night(unless your at a lodge). Then what the animals routines are. A cost effective hunt gets really expensive when your luggage gets lost or your watch/wives jewelry goes missing. I try to do everything carry on as I just don't trust the airlines. Also keep in mind what you intend to hunt, its hard to resist an animal when you stumble across a monster, even if they carry an expensive trophy fee.
     
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  18. Paolo Mauritania

    Paolo Mauritania AH Senior Member

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    I have been traveling around the world for 35 years now, I have been in Africa for years in some amazing places and in some less than amenable, the pic here is in the Guinean (Conakry) prospecting for gold on the Baffin river.........typical bush Hilton case. Mauritania is not that better but safer (medically included).

    If I have to give my two cents I normally lay down my costs list when I plan a mission or a trip, things are not that different and sometime worth a Skype call to confirm some of the costs and assumptions without incurring huge international calls bills.

    My costs and check list is as follows:

    Personal Equipment:
    -Clothing & shoes (get some military surplus, they are cheap and very likely of the best quality to stand abuses), don't forget head covers and bandanas. Confirm if there is a laundry service and plan for a change a day if possible or alternatively less frequently and avoid cotton it keeps body odors like hell, still plan one change a day for the underwear. On a note in the bush I use the old military shorts type of underwear, more comfy and a lot easy to maintain than modern types. Good sun bath helps to "dry clean" items not worn. Wool socks, thick or thin they work well in both cold and hot climate. If you haven't gone through the experience of serving in the army, it is a good idea to break your boots before going, "ruck sack" blister are a real pest, however it helps when marching a lot by foot to wear a think pantyhose like material socks under the wool socks, I used them during deployment and never had blisters and believe me in the early 80's army boots were nowhere near as sophisticated as they are today. If you are going for all leather boots, take a shower with them on and walk in them till they dry and they will fit to your foot like a glove.
    - Opt for a good back pack (60-100 liters), for two week traveling it will be more than enough capacity to hold everything. Forget about expensive suitcases or other "Clark Gable" Mogambo's items. It is amazing how beaten up expensive suitcases get in Africa airport and anywhere else in the world. Here military surplus works fine and they are cheap.
    -Plug/socket adapter (they sell them at the airport or at the luggage shops for few dollars, one unit serves all the requirements for international sockets).
    - One personal hygiene pouch, again military style, easy bound, indestructible and can be hang from a hook (provided) anywhere.
    - Phone: forget your roaming service, you want to end up with a hefty bill, start roaming, you are going to pay for every call from your country to where you are on international rates. Ask the outfitter to provide a local rechargeable chip at the airport or upon arrival, make sure it fits your phone (send out an sms with the new number including the international country code to your loved one). Get a cheap and sturdy phone, all these IPod, I Pad and the like are very prone to dust and breaking and in certain places are a real nuisance, you will discover the world as it was many years ago without mobile phone...........it will make your experience more unforgettable.
    -Critter protection: invest few bucks in a clothing critter protection spray (Sawyer Permethrin based) spray all the clothing till they are wet all over and let them dry naturally, once treated it will last for 3-4 washings, more if the washing is only water.
    If is sunny and you have the north Wisconsin type of skin, wear long sleeves.
    Personal hygiene items (1 week):
    Do not exceed and bring dental floss.
    First Aid Items:
    - Insect repellent in small gel vials (Picaidirin or DEET), Sawyer has a good line used by the military
    - Tick remover or twizers for thorn
    - Disinfecting pads
    - Plasters of the heavy duty type
    - Two elastic bandages (for snake bites first aid or for sprinkled ankles)
    - Vials of ionic water solutions (they are small an in plastic for eye or small cut wash)
    - Sun screen better in stick type
    - One tactical bandage for a bit larger wounds (they are self disinfecting and in sealed packages)
    Other items for bush comfort:
    - Hydration salt tablet
    - Water purification tablets
    - One water filter 0.02 microns absolute porosity (130 $ but worth all the money) good up to a millions gallons without major maintenance very small in size
    - One hydration bladder 3.5 liters
    - One lattice small tubing
    - One military poncho
    - One military canteen with metal cup
    - One fire starting rod
    - One good knife with sharpening stone ( I cannot overemphasize this item)
    - One roll of good duct tape (a million uses)
    - One head lamp of good quality with spare batteries
    - One pair of heavy leather gloves
    - One small vial of vaseline
    - One military hammock
    - 100 feet of paracord
    - A treated insect net single person
    - One quart titanium cooking pot

    I'm assuming an unforeseen overnight stop for those who do not like to sleep on the ground.

    Others:
    - One military belt or sturdy leather belt (this latter can also be used as a strop for the knife)
    - One butt pack military style (all items above stays in the butt pack except the canteen)

    Move light, starts and stay hydrated throughout the day.

    So far total investment is, aside the knife and the filter not more than 500$ at the most and it will last for long time.

    Everything else as far as accommodation is concerned should be included in the price, ask for extra beverages and spirits. Ask about supplies during hunting, water especially, any extra?

    Tipping: a Skype call should clear the mood for a budget. The good thing about Africa is that there is always a solution.

    Games price: the list should be clear about inclusions and exclusions. I don't see any problem with it.

    Weapons: if you rent the rates should be clear; I would buy an extra box of ammo for practice if unfamiliar with the weapon

    Bow Hunting: bow in a hard case, with arrows and accessories. Two spare strings, serving material, spare nocks, BH sharpening kit, spare glue for inserts and feathers, spare inserts........I'm a traditional so for compound hunter I leave it to you.

    Camera: everything needed including spare films, charger, etc. I prefer a compact one if I bring it.

    Check what is the average salary in the country, this will give you an idea how much local currency to exchange for taxi and other amenities if you need them. Negotiate.

    Taxidermy: this for me is a luxury I have seen some good ideas in the posts.

    In conclusion I hop to have given some useful tips, these have worked well for me in countries like the one in the pics below (Guinea) , my experience is Africa is that extra luxury comes at high price, reasonable treatment come cheaper; after all is common sense anywhere where logistic is an issue, extras come at a high price and don't forget to smell the roses, your PH is going to give you the experience of a lifetime.

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  19. Paolo Mauritania

    Paolo Mauritania AH Senior Member

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    PS: I'm on the brink of getting into the "old fart" category; why? I spend a lot of time in meetings and in jacket and tie............I discovered that when I'm in the bush, all my ailment disappear, I loose weight and I feel a lot better with myself.
    Without getting too philosophical about what counts in life, I believe going to Africa once in a life time has to be done, I'll guarantee you that you'll get back a different person, hunting or not, it will help you understand what is really important in life and how much sometimes, we worry for things that are not that essential in a relentless pursuit of the unnecessary.
    Africa can be violent and brutal but can also be fascinating and brings us back to a time where life was worth living and the important things were a lot clearer. Having gone through two wars and countless countries, I have to admit that out of the two biggest displays of hospitality I have even experienced in my life, one happened in Africa in a remote village with no running water, no electricity, no literacy, no phones and no medical care...........meditate.
     
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  20. Paolo Mauritania

    Paolo Mauritania AH Senior Member

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    For whoever is interested a paper I wrote a while ago about water management in the wilderness, not always applicable in the well organized safari, but you never know, for sure it helps having a more clear picture over the "gadget hype" currently going on when traveling to remote areas. Feel free to use it as you see fit.
     

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