Permits & Importation Procedures for Sport Hunted Trophies

Discussion in 'Safari Planning Guide' started by AfricaHunting.com, Feb 1, 2008.

  1. AfricaHunting.com

    AfricaHunting.com FOUNDER AH Ambassador

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    Permits & Importation Procedures for Sport Hunted Trophies

    Laws and regulations pertaining to permits and importation for sport hunted trophies may change, therefore this article is full of links to send you directly to the source rather than supply you with information that could be out of date.

    Some species may be available on the hunting license of the country; however they may not be available on quota anywhere in the country. Also individual hunting outfitters may or may not be given any quota or have any remaining licenses left for some species.

    Some species may not be able to be imported back into your country of residence. You can find information on the importation of sport hunted trophies at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service at http://www.fws.gov/permits or the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) at www.cites.org.

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    U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service & CITIES Permits for Sport Hunted Trophies
    The import, export, or re-export of a number of sport hunted trophies may be regulated by a conservation law or treaty, which is implemented by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and requires a permit. This regulation is part of domestic and international conservation efforts to protect wildlife subject to international trade. You can find up to date information on the importation of sport hunted trophies, how to obtain a permit, as well as instruction on how to fill out the application by going directly to U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service at http://www.fws.gov/permits.

    The importation of particular sport hunted trophies requires a CITES permit (i.e. African Elephant, White Rhinoceros, Leopard, etc.), you will need to submit an application to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. You can download the CITIES permit application forms at http://www.fws.gov/international/per...orthunted.html. CITES stands for Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, visit their web site at www.cites.org.

    Should either of the above links be broken visit the home page of U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service at www.fws.gov and just simply browse through their web site to find the link to the Permit page, once there for CITIES forms, click on Application Forms?

    Here are a few resources from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service which you might find interesting:
    Importing Personal Sport Hunted Trophies from Africa, Guidelines for U.S. Hunters
    Importing Your Leopard or African Elephant Trophy

    Here are a few resources from CITES which you might find interesting:
    How CITES works (the species covered by CITES are listed in three Appendices according to the degree of protection they need)
    The CITES Appendices
    Appendices I, II & III
    CITES Species Database (search species by country)

    Residents of other countries should consult their local CITES Permit agency.

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    Center for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) Etiologic Agent Import Permit Program for Baboon Trophies
    For hunters wishing to import or transport non-human primate trophies such as Baboon, skin or skull that has not been fully taxidermied or treated so that it is non-infectious, you will need to get a permit to import or transport etiologic agents hosts or vectors of human disease from the Center for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) Etiologic Agent Import Permit Program. Fully taxidermied or treated Baboon trophies will not require such permit for importation into the United States.

    Unworked dipped Baboon (primate) and Warthog (swine) trophy parts have to be packed separately. They can however be; shipped together (in it's own package) as an extra package with the main consignment OR integrated in it's own package within the larger main consignment - as long as it is packed separately - contamination free - and marked accordingly. The local taxidermist should be aware of the special shipping conditions applicable to both primate and swine trophies.

    You can find up to date information on the import or transport of etiologic agents hosts or vectors of human disease, how to obtain a permit, as well as instruction on how to fill out the application by going directly to the Center for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) Etiologic Agent Import Permit Program at http://www.cdc.gov/od/eaipp/ or visiting the links below.

    CDC Permit to Import or Transport Etiologic Agents Hosts or Vectors of Human Disease
    CDC Import Permit Applications Forms
    CDC Guidance for importation of Non-Human Primate Trophies
    CDC Frequently Asked Questions about Etiological Agent Import Permits

    Residents of other countries should consult their local CITES Permit agency.

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    Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
    APHIS serves to facilitate safe international trade by regulating the import and export of animal products presented at the border, www.aphis.usda.gov.


    Canada - Permits & Importation Procedures for Sport Hunted Trophies

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    Canada Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)
    CITES is an international agreement to regulate trade in specific species of wild animals and plants, as well as their respective parts and derivatives, www.cites.ec.gc.ca.

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    Environment Canada
    Environment Canada is the lead agency responsible for CITES implementation in Canada, www.ec.gc.ca.

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    The Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act (WAPPRIITA)
    WAPPRIITA is the legislation used to implement CITES in Canada and by which Canada meets its obligations under CITES, http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/W-8.5/SOR-96-263/index.html.

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    Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS)
    CWS agency handles wildlife matters that are the responsibility of the federal government. This includes the protection and management of migratory birds and nationally important wildlife habitat, endangered species, research on nationally important wildlife issues, control of international trade in endangered species, and international treaties, www.cws-scf.ec.gc.ca.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2015 at 2:59 PM
  2. Safari Specialty Importers

    Safari Specialty Importers SPONSOR AH Enthusiast

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    This is a great post but is something that our hunters need not be concerned with because we take care of this and more on the hunters' behalf. Our service is all about stepping into your shoes and let us handle all that is required for the export and import of your trophies from anywhere in the world. We apply for all applicable USFWL or USDA permits and are responsible for making sure they are correct and compliant with the export permits issued by the country of origin. We take the worry of compliance off your shoulders….

     
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