ZAMBIA Hunting Information

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ZAMBIA Hunting Information

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Hunting Zambia
The history of Zambia is closely linked with that of its neighbor, Zimbabwe (formerly known as Rhodesia). In 1953 the British government created the Federation of Rhodesia Nyasaland consisting of Southern Rhodesia, Northern Rhodesia (modern day Zambia) and the Nyasaland (modern day Malawi).

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In 1959, Kenneth Kaunda founded the party of the United National Independence and unleashed a campaign of civil disobedience, the result of which caused the British to end its "Greater Rhodesia" endeavor. The Federation was dissolved and Zambia gained its independence in 1964.

The history of modern big game hunting in Zambia is a short one. Zambia only opened for sport hunting in the 1970's while simultaneously creating GMA's (Game Management Areas). In 2001 the Zambian government revoked all licenses previously granted to the safari companies and all hunting stopped. The government then reversed its decision in 2003, hunting licenses were again granted and hunting resumed after a redistribution of the hunting concessions.

Zambia is among those African countries without access to the sea. It is bordered to the south by Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Namibia, to the west by Angola, to the north by the Democratic Republic of Congo and Tanzania and to the east by Malawi.

The vegetation of Zambia consists mostly of Miombo, a kind of glade-forest of trees of various species. In the extreme southern regions there are also some mopane (Colophospermum mopane) forests, one of the more common trees of southern Africa. The mopane wood is one of hardest and heaviest and therefore the most difficult to work with. Zambia also has large areas of grassy savannas as is found in most African countries. Zambia is essentially a high plateau with an average altitude of 3,200 to 4,200 feet (1,000 to 1,300 meters).

In Zambia hunting is permitted in three different types of areas; Game Management Areas, private hunting areas and conservancies. The sum of these areas covers over 6.5 million acres. Most of the hunting areas, the majority of which are GMA (Game Management Areas), are located in the Luangwa valley or in the Kafue plateau region. The others are spread out over the plains of the Kafue, in the region of Bangweueu Lake and western Zambia. All of these territories are non fenced and open.

Elephant hunting in Zambia is allowed. Lions and Leopards are hunted with bait and can be found in almost all areas. As in Zimbabwe, Leopards in Zambia are known for their large size.

There are also large herds of Buffalo (Syncerus Caffer Caffer) in Zambia, some over a thousand head. One typically finds these larger concentrations in the Luangwa valley, but Buffalo are present nearly everywhere in this country.

Zambia is home to a large variety of antelope, including several species endemic to Zambia such as the Black Lechwe (Kobus Leche Smithmani) and the Kafue Lechwe (Kobus Leche Kafuensis). Likewise, the Cookson's Wildebeest (Connochaetes Taurinus Cooksoni) is found only in the Lungwa valley. In addition to these rare species, Zambia boasts a healthy population of Sable Antelope (Hippotragus Niger) with many possibilities for great trophies.

In Zambia one can also hunt the Livingstone's Eland (Taurotragus Oryx Livingstonianus), Lichtenstein's Hartebeest (Alcelaphus Lichtensteinii), Greater Kudu (Tragelaphus Strepsiceros), Bohor Reedbuck (Redunca Arundinum), Sitatunga (Tragelaphus Spekei), Tsessebe (Damaliscus Lunatus), Common Waterbuck (Kobus Ellipsiprymnus), Defassa Waterbuck (Kobus Ellipsiprymnus Defassa), Blue Wildebeest (Connochaetes Taurinus), Chobe Bushbuck (Tragelaphus Scriptus Ornatus), Impala (Aepyceros Melampus), Klipspringer (Oreotragus Oreotragus), Puku (Kobus Vardonii), Oribi (Ourebia Ourebi), Sharpe's Grysbok (Raphicerus Sharpie), Warthog (Phacochoerus Aethiopicus), Bushpig (Potamochoerus Larvatus), Common Duiker (Sylvicapra Grimmia) Hippos and Crocodiles are abundant in most of the rivers and can also be hunted.

In Zambia hunting is done on foot and as the hunting areas are not very rugged, the actual hunting is not especially rigorous. The professional hunters are most often Zambian, white or black, but there are also South African and Zimbabwean PH's and occasionally European ones as well.

The hunting camps in Zambia are usually tent camps. They are large and comfortable and some camps are even quite luxurious. All normally include electricity and some even offer modern communication such as satellite phone. In some private hunting areas the accommodations are permanent lodges and/or bungalows.

Travel to the hunting areas is via Lusaka, the capital of Zambia, by car, but more often by chartered plane since many hunting territories have their own landing strip.

The best time for hunting in Zambia extends from June to November.

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Finding a Hunting Outfitter in Zambia

The single most important thing you need to do to ensure that you are booking with a good hunting outfitter is check their references. The outfitter should provide you with more than a few references, especially clients who have hunted with them within the last year and you should call many of them.

Click here to check out our Zambia Hunting Reports, a section where you can find or post more detailed Hunting Reports. Or visit our forums where you can interact with other hunters and industry professionals, post questions or read what others are discussing about hunting in Zambia by clicking here.

We are all empowered by learning from each other and we encourage you to make educated decisions based upon honest information and real experience.


Zambia Hunting Areas Map and Satellite Imagery
Click here for Zambia hunting areas map, country and satellite imagery maps.

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Climate in Zambia
Zambia is warm all year round, but has three distinct seasons. Between December and April the weather is hot and wet; from May to August it is cooler and dry; between September and November conditions are hot and dry. Average summer temperatures range between 77D F to 95D F (25D C to 35D C), while in winter the variation increases ranging from 43D F to 75D F (6D C to 24D C).

Although Zambia lies within the tropics, much of it has a pleasant climate because of the altitude. Temperatures are highest in the valleys of the Zambezi, Luangwa, and Kafue and by the shores of Lakes Tanganyika, Mweru, and Bangweulu.

There are wide seasonal variations in temperature and rainfall. October is the hottest month. The main rainy season starts in mid-November, with heavy tropical storms lasting well into April. The northern and northwestern provinces have an annual rainfall of about 125 cm (50 in), while areas in the far south have as little as 75 cm (30 in). May to mid-August is the cool season, after which temperatures rise rapidly. September is very dry.

Daytime temperatures may range from 23D to 31D C (73 - 88D F), dropping at night to as low as 5D C (41D F) in June and July. Lusaka, at 1,250 m (4,100 ft), has an average minimum of 9D C (48D F) and an average maximum of 23D C (73D F) in July, with averages of 17D C (63D F) and 26D C (79D F), respectively, in January; normal annual rainfall is 81 cm (32 in).

Weather Underground provides a very detailed look at current weather conditions, weather forecasts, a history and almanac for predicting average weather conditions during the time while you will be traveling in that part of the world. Click here for Zambia's climate and temperature forecast.

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Zambia Hunting Season & When Hunting is Allowed
- Hunting Season - No set season but hunting safaris are usually conducted from May through November.
- A hunter must be a client of a registered Zambian safari company.
- Trophy hunting in Zambia is dictated by fair chase regulations and professional hunters are governed by their own code of conduct a sort of mixture of ethics and common sense designed specifically to promote the ultimate safari hunting experience. Failure to adhere to these simple laws can result in the termination of a safari and confiscation of trophies.
- Trophy hunting may take place within the hours of daylight during the hunting season, no hunting is allowed at night and and no hunting is allowed with artificial light.
- The Zambian government strictly controls the minimum number of days for a hunting safari based upon the species being hunted. Above and beyond the government regulations, the hunting outfitter may also impose their own guidelines as to the minimum number of days required to hunt certain species or combination of species.
- A hunting license is issued for a specific number of species in specific hunting areas.
- Classic hunting safaris are full bag hunts which may include Lion, Leopard, Roan Antelope and Sable. The hunter may purchase hunting licenses for as many species as are on the quota for a given hunting period and area.
- Mini hunting safaris limit the hunter to no more than seven animals of different species in a given hunting area and Roan Antelope, Sable, Leopard and Lion are not available on these safaris. Two of each plains game species may be taken on a mini safari.
- There are many combinations to these hunting safaris, for instance it is possible to secure two concurrent mini safaris (at double the concession fee) allowing the possibility of 14 plains game animals to be taken over 14 days. This is especially advantageous to the operators in the Kafue regions where there is a large variety of game species. The hunting of specialized animals such as the Kafue or Black Lechwe will incur the addition of two to three days including traveling. If for example both Leopard and Sitatunga are required during the same safari then this may be sold as an 18 to 21 day hunt and may incorporate two different concessions.
- Hunting from a vehicle is not permitted, though the vehicle can be used to reach the area from where hunting on foot can begin.
- Shooting an animal from a vehicle is not permitted.
- Baiting prior to the start of the hunting safari is not permitted. No bait animal provision within the pricing structure.
- The number of gun bearers and trackers is restricted to three.

Here below are examples of hunting packages endorsed by the Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA):
- A 7 day mini hunting safari can include a Buffalo and/or plains game, quota limit of 7 plains game species.
- A 10 day mini hunting safari can include a Sable or Roan Antelope, quota limit of 10 plains game species.
- A 14 day classic hunting safari is the minimum number of days required to be able to hunt a Leopard, quota unlimited for plains game species with up to two species each.
- An 18 day classic hunting safari is the minimum number of days required to be able to hunt a Lion, quota unlimited for plains game species with up to two species each.
- A 21 to 28 day classic hunting safari is the minimum number of days required to be able to hunt a Lion and/or a Leopard, quota unlimited for plains game species with up to two species each.

You will find information about the bird hunting season in Zambia near the bottom of this page.

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Species to Hunt in Zambia
Zambia offers over forty-five species for trophy hunting, including four of the big five which consist of Elephant, Lion, Leopard and Buffalo.

Click here to visit AfricaHunting.com complete list of species available to hunt in Zambia.


Shot Placement Guide for the Perfect Shot
Click here to visit our shot placement guide, the most comprehensive shot placement guide of African game online.

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Bowhunting in Zambia
Bowhunting in Zambia started during the 1993 hunting season when the government legalized bow hunting. Zambia shut down sport hunting altogether from 2001 only to reopen in 2004. This country offers tremendous opportunities for bowhunters, and Zambia might be the best place in Africa for Leopard bowhunting and Lion bowhunting, however few operators have the experience to conduct bowhunting safaris, so careful selection of the hunting outfitter is very important.

Zambia does not have an additional bow qualification for professional hunters, however a professional hunter licensed by the Ministry of Tourism and Wildlife is required to be present during the hunt to guide and protect the hunting client.

Bowhunting big five and/or dangerous game, such as bowhunting Leopard, Lion, Cape Buffalo and Elephant is legal in Zambia.

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Importation of Bows & Arrows into Zambia
It is legal for hunters to import bows for bowhunting purposes into Zambia, however check with your bowhunting outfitter as you will require permission above the regular Temporary Firearms Import Permit (TIP) from the Wildlife Authorities.

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Minimum Equipment Requirements for Bowhunting in Zambia
Zambia does not have any minimum equipment requirements for bowhunting so common sense will apply or here below find the requirements for South Africa.
- Big Game
Bow Kinetic Energy 80 ft/lbs
Arrow Weight 700 grain
(Elephant, Rhino, Hippo, Buffalo)
- Medium Game
Bow Kinetic Energy 70 ft/lbs
Arrow Weight 550 grain
(Kudu, Eland, Oryx / Gemsbok, Hartebeest, Wildebeest, Zebra, Giraffe, Sable Antelope, Roan Antelope, Waterbuck, Tsessebe, etc.)
- Small Game
Bow Kinetic Energy 40 ft/lbs
Arrow Weight 400 grain
(Warthog, Nyala, Springbok, Impala, Blesbok, Duiker, Steenbok, Ostrich, Caracal, Black-Backed Jackal, Game Birds, etc.)

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Minimum Equipment Requirements for Rifle Hunting in Zambia
- Zambia does not have a minimum equipment requirement for rifle hunting plains game and rely on common sense. Caliber in the .270 range will be well suited for some of the smaller plains game in Zambia.
- The minimum equipment requirement for rifle hunting in Zambia is .300 caliber for dangerous game such as Leopard and Lion.
- The minimum equipment requirement for rifle hunting in Zambia is .375 caliber for dangerous game or big game hunting such as Elephant, Buffalo and Hippo.
- Zambia does not require a minimum energy (Eo - muzzle velocity) for calibers used.

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Traveling with Firearms & Ammunition
Traveling to Africa usually requires taking at least a couple of different airlines as well as departing from several countries whose laws and regulations are constantly changing. And they all have their own rules, regulations and laws for which it is your responsibility to be aware and in compliance with all of them. For this reason you should read the Africa Hunting article on Laws & Regulations for Hunters Traveling with Weapons by clicking here.

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Permits & Importation of Firearms & Ammunition into Zambia
The following section contains the basic information you will need to know, for more detailed information you should read Africa Hunting article on Importation or Transiting Procedures Through Countries with Weapons by clicking here, especially if you are transiting through or traveling to another country.

- Temporary importation of firearms and ammunition into Zambia is NOT free of charge, but the cost is minimal, usually included in the cost of your hunting safari and the process is quick and easy. Should you be traveling with bows and arrows to Zambia, check with your hunting outfitter as you will require permission above the regular Temporary Firearms Import Permit (TIP) from the Wildlife Authorities.

- Your hunting outfitter will send you a form to fill out and return to them so they can arrange for your firearms and ammunition temporary import/export permits months prior to your arrival as required by the government of Zambia. This permit will be based upon the firearm information you provide to your outfitter so it is very important that you carefully consider which firearms you will be bringing with you, as once you have submitted the form you will not be able to change your mind. It is very important that all weapons serial numbers be exactly the same when you arrive as what was issued on your import/export permit. Last minute changes of mind cause more problems regarding gun permits than any other reason. Exact number of ammunition is also important.

- There is a limit of three firearms per hunter that may be imported into Zambia for trophy hunting purposes. However if traveling through South Africa a maximum of two firearms are allowed even if you are just in transit. Some European countries also have greater limitation than Zambia as to the number of firearms which can be brought into their country even while in transit. You should read the Africa Hunting article on Importation or Transiting Procedures Through Countries with Weapons by clicking here.

- No automatic firearms are allowed.

- Semi-automatic firearms are allowed for hunting purposes, however avoid bringing any weapon of military appearance.

- No weapons which fall under military categories such as .308 Winchester (7.62x51mm NATO), please check with your outfitter if you have a questionable caliber.

- There is no limit to the number of rounds of ammunition that may be imported into Zambia for trophy hunting purposes, however common sense should apply and also remember that you may encounter greater restrictions from the airline(s) you are traveling on or country you are departing from or other countries you may be visiting or transiting through. For more information on this topic, read the Africa Hunting article, Laws & Regulations for Hunters Traveling with Weapons by clicking here.

- Only ammunition for the specific caliber(s) you are bringing may be imported.

- Handguns are allowed for hunting purposes, check with your hunting outfitter as you will require permission above the regular Temporary Firearms Import Permit (TIP) from the Wildlife Authorities.

- No crossbows.

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Need help traveling to or through South Africa with your guns?
South Africa is the number one hunting destination in Africa and most safari hunters will at least transit through South Africa even if they are not staying in the country to hunt. That's why the services of riflepermits.com are so valuable. They can help you navigate the stressful and cumbersome process of transiting or importing your guns into South Africa making it easy and less time consuming.

riflepermits.com work hand in hand-in-hand with the South African Police Services (SAPS) to provide import/export or in-transit permits for your firearms before you even arrive in South Africa. They will hand deliver your pre-authorized permit to you on arrival and also guide you through the procedure at the SAPS Permit Office making it as hassle free as possible.

They also have rifle storage facilities for those who just want to do a bit of traveling or sight seeing in South Africa as well. They can help make your hunting safari a great experience from start to finish!

For more information visit their website!


Henry Durrheim
riflepermits.com
- QUICK & EASY arrival with your firearm in South Africa! We'll meet you and escort you through it...
henry@riflepermits.com
www.riflepermits.com


Professional Hunters Association Zambia (PHAZ)
Professional Hunters Association Zambia (PHAZ) is an important organization, with over 80 members. PHAZ works closely, and has a strong relationship, with both the Ministry of Tourism and Wildlife, the governing authority for hunting operators and professional hunters in Zambia, and the Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA). However it is important to mention that Zambia's hunting outfitters and professional hunters are not required to be members of PHAZ to conduct hunting safaris. Click here to visit PHAZ web site for more information regarding basic hunting laws and regulations and more.

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Safari Hunting Operators Association of Zambia (SHOAZ)
No web site
Contact Barry Bell-Cross
P.O. Box 30721
Lusaka, Zambia
(260) 1 239420
gbcross@zamnet.zm


Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA)
All hunting operators and professional hunters in Zambia, to be legal, must be registered with the Ministry of Tourism and Wildlife who governs Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA). ZAWA contributes to the preservation of Zambia's Natural heritage, ecosystem and biological diversity for present and future generations through the careful conservation of Zambia's wildlife. In 2002 ZAWA leased the concession hunting rights to Zambian registered safari hunting operators for a period of 10 years, these hunting operators are responsible for both managing the Game Management Areas (GMAs) and protecting the interests of the resident communities. To visit Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA) web site click here.

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Zambia Hunting Permits & Licenses
The wildlife authorities and the government of Zambia allocates quotas by species to each hunting block or hunting territory on an individual basis.

Your hunting license and permit will be applied for and obtained by your hunting outfitter well prior to your arrival, please check with your outfitter as to the current charges or if the cost of this paperwork is already included in the price of your hunt.

The following is required regarding permits for trophy hunting in Zambia:
- The Zambian government strictly controls the minimum number of days for a hunting safari based upon the species being hunted. Above and beyond the government regulations, the hunting outfitter may also impose their own guidelines as to the minimum number of days required to hunt certain species or combination of species.
- A hunting license is issued for a specific number of species in specific hunting areas.
- Clients are only permitted to hunt animals for which a permit is issued.
- All animals are subject to quota availability.
- Permits must be issued prior to the hunt commencing.
- A separate permit must be issued for each individual hunting client.
- With some exceptions of species available on license, two species of each is allowed. The price of the second animal is half again the cost of the first.
- Classic hunting safaris are full bag hunts which may include Lion, Leopard, Roan Antelope and Sable. The hunter may purchase hunting licenses for as many species as are on the quota for a given hunting period and area.
- Mini hunting safaris limit the hunter to no more than seven animals of different species in a given hunting area and Roan Antelope, Sable, Leopard and Lion are not available on these safaris. Two of each plains game species may be taken on a mini safari.
- There are many combinations to these hunting safaris, for instance it is possible to secure two concurrent mini safaris (at double the concession fee) allowing the possibility of 14 plains game animals to be taken over 14 days. This is especially advantageous to the operators in the Kafue regions where there is a large variety of game species. The hunting of specialized animals such as the Kafue or Black Lechwe will incur the addition of two to three days including traveling. If for example both Leopard and Sitatunga are required during the same safari then this may be sold as an 18 to 21 day hunt and may incorporate two different concessions.
- There is a complex system of fees for Zambia's Game Management Areas (GMA's) and each area incorporates a levy called a concession fee, which as a general rule escalates in scale in Zambia's prime areas. Zambia's Game Management Areas (GMA's) are classed as Prime, Secondary and Depleted. Some hunting operators or professional hunters quote concession fees separately, others incorporate it into the daily rate or as a percentage of the trophy fees, or both.
- It is well worth finding out the classification of the GMA prior to booking and also to research contemporary references as some of our lesser areas do have outstanding hunting for certain species and therefore can prove to be financially rewarding.
- Clients are expected to abide by all Wildlife Hunting Regulations in Zambia.


CITIES Permits & U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

The importation of some individual sport hunted trophies requires a CITES permit (i.e. African Elephant, White Rhinoceros and Leopard to name a few), you will need to submit an application to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service if you are planning to import any of the species on their list. You can download the CITIES permit application forms by clicking here. CITES stands for Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, visit their web site at www.cites.org.

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Shipping & Importing Your Hunting Trophies Back
I highly recommend that when it come to the intricacies of importing your hunting trophies do yourself a favor and hire experts to facilitate the process. Allan Zarach from TROPHY SHIPPERS (www.trophyshippers.com) offers an incredible service at a great price.

TROPHY SHIPPERS is a family owned company and have been in business since 1981. They are a customs brokerage and freight forwarding company that is dedicated to helping hunters quickly and efficiently get their hunting trophies home. They know what your hunting trophies mean to you, because they are a family of hunters themselves. If you have trophies that you need brought back to the United States or are planning a trip to Africa to hunt or anywhere in the world, let TROPHY SHIPPERS handle all of the paperwork, clearances, and shipments for you!

They truly provide an invaluable full service for managing an increasingly more detailed and complex process for the importation of your trophies from start to finish. If you would like to contact them, TROPHY SHIPPERS can be reached at Cell/WhatsApp +1 (847) 927-0101 / Office +1 (630) 595-7300, or via their website www.trophyshippers.com, click here.




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The Safari Planning Guide
Click here to visit the Africa Hunting Safari Planning Guide, or click the direct links below to visit the individual articles in this section with many useful resources to help you plan and prepare for your African hunting safari:
- Hunting Safari Preparation Timeline
- Safari Planning Resource Guide
- Why You Should Always Use A Hunting Travel Agent!
- Travel, Medical & Evacuation Insurance
- Why You Should Use A Hunting Trophy Shipping & Importation Specialist!
- What You Need to Know About Packing
- Clothing & Footwear List
- Personal Items & Toiletries List
- Hunting Gear List for Rifle Hunters
- Hunting Gear List for Bow Hunters
- Travel Documents & Money
- Tipping Guide

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Camouflage
Camouflage clothing is allowed in Zambia during the actual hunt. I would advise that it only be worn during the hunt and not in town or for travel.

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How to Get There
A majority of international hunting clients will fly directly from their country of origin into South Africa on a major international airline, many of which offer a route to Johannesburg (Tambo International Airport - JNB). A less traveled, although still popular route, is through any major European city to Johannesburg. Both routes then require a short flight to get to Zambia's capital Lusaka or the city of Livingstone.

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Travel Agent Specializing in Hunting Clientele
You may wish to consider using a travel agent that specializes in hunting worldwide or in Africa as they may be familiar with these routes and used to working with these airlines. Specialty travel agents can often get better deals than you can find on major websites or through regular travel agents. I highly recommend TRAVEL EXPRESS, hunting travel specialists, they are the company that I personally use. Jennifer Ginn can help you, she is very knowledgeable and a hunter herself. She can assist you with all aspects of your hunting travel planning from airfare, lodging and car rentals to entry visa's, firearm permits, etc... Click here to visit TRAVEL EXPRESS website www.TravelExpressAgency.com.



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International Airport in Zambia
- City: Lusaka - capital of Zambia
Lusaka International Airport
Airport Code LUN
Located 10 miles (16 km) northeast of the city of Lusaka

- City: Livingstone - city on the border of Zimbabwe near the Victoria Falls, located 290 miles (470 km) southwest of Lusaka capital of Zambia
Livingstone Airport
Airport Code LVI
Located 2 miles (3 km) northwest of the city of Livingstone

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Major Airlines Flying into Zambia

Zambian Airways
www.zambianairways.com


British Airways
www.britishairways.com


Delta Airlines
www.delta.com


Lufthansa (Germany)
www.lufthansa.com


South African Airways
www.flysaa.com

* Major Airlines change scheduling and destination options frequently.

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Travel Information
Click here to view the Africa Hunting travel information section, or the direct links below, with many useful articles and resources to help you plan your travel for your African hunting safari, including:
- Importation or Transiting Procedures Through Countries with Weapons
- Laws & Regulations for Hunters Traveling with Weapons
- Airports & Airlines
- Value Added Tax (VAT) Refunds
- Embassies & Consulates

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Visa & Travel Documents
All foreigners must be in possession of a passport that will remain valid for at least six months after the intended date of departure from Zambia as well as a round trip airline ticket.

To find out if you need to apply for a Visa in advance, a great resource with free information is Travel Document System (TDS) at www.traveldocs.com. If you are in need of a visa, Travel Document System is nationally recognized as a leading authority in the field of international Travel Documents. Travelers are quite often not sure of the specific requirements or documentation required to enter into a foreign country. TDS helps international travelers easily understand what is specifically required of them in order to gain passage into another country and provides visa services for U.S. citizens to most countries for which an entry visa is required www.traveldocs.com.

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Traveler's Health & ImmunizationsNo vaccinations or International Health Certificate are required to enter Zambia, however we suggest that you visit the Center for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) for their recommendations for travel in Zambia.

CDC recommends that you see a health-care provider who specializes in Travel Medicine. Find a travel medicine clinic near you by clicking here. If you have a medical condition, you should also share your travel plans with any doctors you are currently seeing for other medical reasons.

Recommended Vaccinations Include:
- Hepatitis A
- Hepatitis B
- Typhoid
- Rabies
- Routine vaccination if you are not up-to-date including Influenza, Polio, MMR (measles/mumps/rubella) and DPT (diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus)

Malaria prophylactics medication is highly recommended and should be considered as mandatory, however we suggest that you visit the Center for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) for their recommendations for travel in Zambia as mosquitoes in this country are resistant to some antimalarial drugs.

The CDC is most credible online resource for up to date health information. Click here to visit the section dedicated to Traveler's Health specific to Zambia. Information about vaccinations, diseases, prevention, tips and much more can be found here.


Malaria Map of Zambia
Click here to enlarge Zambia malaria map.


Malaria Maps of Africa
Click here for Africa malaria maps, distribution model, endemic / epidemic risk areas, duration of malaria transmission season and duration of malaria transmission season.


Emergency Evacuation and Field Rescue Membership

No matter if it's your first or fifth time hunting in Africa, unavoidable accidents do happen. Whether a medical or security emergency, an evacuation from a remote part of Zambia could cost well over $100,000. I strongly recommend that anyone traveling to Zambia purchase a membership with Global Rescue, the only crisis response company that provides hunters with medical and security evacuation and consultation services anywhere in the world, even the most remote areas. Their deployable teams of paramedics and special operations veterans, backed by on-staff physicians and the specialists at Johns Hopkins Medicine, will get to you wherever you are, by any means necessary, and evacuate you all the way to your home country hospital of choice.
Member benefits include:
- 24hr medical advisory services from critical care paramedics and in-house physicians
- Specialists at Johns Hopkins Medicine available in real-time
- Field Rescue from the point of illness or injury
- Evacuation back to the member's home hospital of choice
- Global network of medical Centers Of Excellence
- Deployable medical and security teams
- Evacuation services provided up to $500,000

Memberships start at $119

If you would like to purchase a membership or have additional questions, Global Rescue can be reached anytime at +1 (617) 459-4200, or via www.globalrescue.com, click here.



Travel Advisory from The U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs

What you should know before you go. You may obtain international travel information by country, warnings for travelers about crime and public announcements about travel abroad in addition to so much other valuable information http://travel.state.gov.

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Embassies & Consulates
Zambia Embassy in the USA www.zambiaembassy.org

Click here for a complete searchable database of all embassies and consulates from every country in the world including Zambia.

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Bird Hunting Season in Zambia During the official bird hunting season birds of certain species can be hunted, hereunder is the list by species. There is a limit of five birds that can be taken per day in Game Management Areas (GMA) and there is no limit when hunting on game farms. Quotas per bird species should be discussed with your hunting outfitter.

Bird hunting fees vary from hunting outfitter and by species.

- May 1st to December 1st
Guineafowl Crested
Guineafowl Helmeted
- November 1st to December 31st
Goose Egyptian
- November 1st to May 31st
Sandgrouse Boublebanded
Sandgrouse Yellow Throated
- January 1st to August 31st
Pigeon Speckled
- April 1st to September 31st
Quail Common
Quail Harlequin
Quail Small Button
- June 1st to December 31st
Dove African Mourning
Dove Laughing
Dove Redeyed
Dove Ringnecked
Duck Nothern Shoveler
Duck Redbilled
Duck Yellowbilled
Duck White Faced Whistling
Francolin Redbilled
Francolin Swainson
Goose African Pygmy
Goose Egyptian
Goose Spurwinged
Teal Cape

Click here to visit AfricaHunting.com complete list of bird species available to hunt in Zambia.

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Tourism in Zambia
The Zambia National Tourist Board web site is a good place to explore what options are available for travel outside of your hunting safari, www.zambiatourism.com. Your hunting safari outfitter may also offer short excursions up to extensive touring through their company as well.

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General Information about Zambia
- Republic of Zambia
- Population 11,700,000
- Capital City Lusaka (1,100,000)
- Languages English (official), Bemba, Kaonda, Lozi, Lunda, Luvale, Nyanja, Tonga and numerous tribal dialects
- Official Currency Zambian Kwacha (ZMK). Denominations in 50,000, 20,000, 10,000, 5,000, 1,000, 500, 100, 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1 Zambian Kwacha bank notes. To view images of these banknotes, click here.
- Electricity, the Zambian standard is 220/240 volts, two-pin and three-pin 15 amp outlets. Most lodges/camps have generator(s) to power the electricity through rechargeable batteries therefore it is recommended to bring a small power inverter that plugs into a cigarette lighter to invert 12V DC Power to 110V AC for recharging in the hunting vehicle. Generator(s) in most camps are only run during the morning and evening hours and sometimes can be run at other times by special request. Be sure to check with your hunting outfitter in Zambia what they are using. Click here for more info.
- Country Dialing Code 260

Click here for more information about Zambia from the CIA World Factbook which supplies a multitude of facts about Zambia.

hunting-zambia.gif
Official Government Web Site Of The Republic Of Zambia
www.state.gov.zm
 
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trophy-hunting.jpg
ZAMBIA Species to Hunt

These species may be available on the hunting license in the country; however they may not be available on quota anywhere in the country. Also individual hunting outfitters may or may not be given any quota or have any remaining licenses left for some species.

Some of these species may not be able to be imported back into your country of residence. You can find information on the importation of sport hunted trophies at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service at Permits or the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) at www.cites.org.

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Big Five Species
(click on animal name for detailed info and pictures)
Buffalo Cape
Elephant
Leopard
Lion

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Animal Species
(click on animal name for detailed info and pictures)
Aardwolf
Antbear/Aardvark
Baboon
Bushbuck Chobe
Bushpig
Caracal
Civet
Crocodile Nile
Duiker Blue
Duiker Natal Red
Duiker Common
Duiker Yellow Backed
Eland Livingstone
Genet Cat
Grysbok Sharpe
Hartebeest Lichtenstein
Hippopotamus
Hyena Spotted
Impala Southern/Common
Jackal Black-Backed
Klipspringer
Kudu Greater/Southern
Lechwe Black
Lechwe Kafue
Lechwe Red
Monkey Blue
Monkey Colobus
Monkey Vervet
Oribi
Porcupine Cape
Puku
Reedbuck Southern
Roan Antelope Southern
Sable Antelope Common
Sitatunga Zambezi
Tsessebe
Warthog
Waterbuck Common
Waterbuck Defassa Crawshay
Wildebeest Blue
Wildebeest Cookson

Zebra Burchell/Plain

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Bird Species
(click on bird name for detailed info and pictures)
Dove African Mourning
Dove Laughing
Dove Redeyed
Dove Ringnecked
Duck Nothern Shoveler
Duck Redbilled
Duck Yellowbilled
Duck White Faced Whistling
Francolin Redbilled
Francolin Swainson
Goose African Pygmy
Goose Egyptian
Goose Spurwinged
Guineafowl Crested
Guineafowl Helmeted
Pigeon Speckled
Quail Common
Quail Harlequin
Quail Small Button
Sandgrouse Boublebanded
Sandgrouse Yellow Throated
Teal Cape
 
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ZAMBIA Hunting Areas Map

Located south of the Equator, Zambia is in both the eastern and southern hemispheres. This landlocked country is positioned in southern Africa, and bordered by the countries of Botswana, Angola, Namibia, D.R.O.C., Tanzania, Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe.

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Satellite Imagery of Zambia
(click on thumbnails to explore satellite imagery)

Latitude/Longitude 15D 26S, 28D 20E E Lusaka Capital of Zambia
Google Earth lets you fly anywhere on earth to view map, satellite and hybrid imagery. You can explore rich geographical content by zooming in and out and moving the image by using the arrow buttons in the upper left corner or by clicking on the image and dragging it in the direction you wish to explore. Click here to explore Zambia.

Zambia Hunting Areas
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Detailed Map of Zambia Hunting Areas
(click on thumbnail to enlarge map)


Zambia Major Cities
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Detailed Map of Zambia
(click on thumbnail to enlarge map)


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Provinces of Zambia
Land divisions 9 provinces Central, Copperbelt, Eastern, Luapula, Lusaka, Northern, North-Western, Southern and Western.

Africa
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ZAMBIA Malaria Map

Gradient Map of Distribution of Endemic Malaria
(click on thumbnails to view larger pictures)



Malaria Maps
Malaria prophylactics medication is recommended for visitors to some parts of Africa, ask your hunting outfitter and we suggest that you visit the Center for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) for their recommendations for travel to your specific destination as mosquitoes in some African countries are resistant to certain antimalarial drugs.


Distribution Model
malaria-africa-map.gif

Background: This map is a theoretical model based on available long-term climate data. It has a resolution of about 5x5 km. Although it is reasonably accurate, it is not based on actual malaria data and may not reflect the real malaria status. It shows the theoretical suitability of local climatic, and therefore the potential distribution of stable malaria transmission in the average year. Please note that climatic conditions, and therefore malaria transmission, vary substantially from one year to the next. Malaria control activities can also dramatically alter the malaria transmission situation.
Meaning: Where climate is "suitable" (red = 1), malaria is likely endemic (hypo-, meso-, hyper- or holoendemic). "Suitable" areas may have little or no malaria because of malaria control. Where climate is "unsuitable" (white = 0), malaria is likely epidemic or absent. Some "unsuitable" areas may actually have endemic malaria because of the presence of surface water in an area where there is little or no rain. In the marginally suitable areas (0.1 - 0.9) transmission may occur at steady but low levels (eg eastern Africa), or in strongly seasonal cycles with great inter-annual variation (eg western & southern Africa).
Source: MARA/ARMA (Mapping Malaria Risk in Africa / Atlas du Risque de la Malaria en Afrique)


Endemic / Epidemic Risk Areas
malaria-map-africa.gif

Background: The malaria distribution model has been re-classified into endemic and epidemic areas. These risk areas have then been used to calculate the number of people living in endemic and epidemic conditions. In Southern Africa (Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe and South Africa) "endemic" encompasses regions where the climate is 50-100% suitable, whereas in the rest of Africa "endemic" refers to regions where climate is 20-100% suitable. Different cut-offs were used, because in southern Africa malaria is at the limit of its distribution and has been largely reduced through malaria control. Otherwise, all comments on the malaria distribution model apply to this map also.
Meaning: Endemic areas are defined as "areas with significant annual transmission, be it seasonal or perennial". Epidemic areas are defined as "areas prone to distinct inter-annual variation, in some years with no transmission taking place at all". Since this is a theoretical model, areas defined as "endemic" may be "epidemic" in reality, or v.v.
Source: MARA/ARMA (Mapping Malaria Risk in Africa / Atlas du Risque de la Malaria en Afrique)


Duration of Malaria Transmission Season
africa-map-malaria.gif

Background: These maps are also theoretical models based on available long-term climate data. They have a resolution of about 5x5 km. Although they are reasonably accurate, they are not based on actual malaria data and may not reflect the real malaria status. They are based on the theoretical suitability of local climatic, and therefore the potential duration, onset and end of the malaria transmission season, in the average year. Please note that climatic conditions, and therefore malaria transmission, vary substantially from one year to the next. Malaria control activities can also dramatically alter the malaria transmission situation. More work is ongoing to refine these models.
Meaning: In the Months of Risk model, malaria transmission is strongly seasonal to epidemic (yellow = 1-3 months), seasonal and endemic (light green = 4-6 months) or perennial and endemic (dark green = 7-12 months). Some areas shown as "No transmission" (white) may actually have endemic malaria because of the presence of surface water in an area where there is little or no rain.
Source: MARA/ARMA (Mapping Malaria Risk in Africa / Atlas du Risque de la Malaria en Afrique)


Duration of Malaria Transmission Season
africa-malaria-map.gif

Background: Based on the seasonality model, these maps simply reflect the first and last month of the average transmission season. All comments on the seasonality model apply to these maps too.
Meaning: The colors indicate the month in which the transmission season starts and ends, in the average year. In a few areas there are two transmission season, so that there are two start and two end of season maps.
Source: MARA/ARMA (Mapping Malaria Risk in Africa / Atlas du Risque de la Malaria en Afrique)
 
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Bowhunters

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Hi Jerome...just to advise, hunting is open in Zambia again this year 2015 with the exception of lion. We believe that will be back next year. Also , bow hunting of lion, leopard, buffalo and hippo is allowed in Zambia......provided a letter of permission is approved by National Parks.
 

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HUNTING ZAMBIA UPDATE

The Zambia section needs to be updated from the 2008 report, e.g. ZAWA (the Zambia Wildlife Authority) was replaced in 2015 by the Department of National Parks and Wildlife; and the population of humans is now 18 million - up from 11.7 million.

Here follows some important dates.

HISTORY

1889
Following on from the Berlin Conference of 1884-1885, the British South Africa Chartered Company under Cecil Rhodes, with a royal charter, colonized Central Africa and created North-Eastern and North-Western Rhodesia.

1911
North-Eastern and North-Western Rhodesia are joined to become Northern Rhodesia under the BSA Company

1924
The British Protectorate of Northern Rhodesia declared

1953 - 1963
The Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland comprising the self-governing British colony of Southern Rhodesia and the British protectorates of Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland was imposed by the British Government between 1953 and 1963 despite the unanimous opposition of their African populations.

1964
Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland became independent as Zambia and Malawi. In 1965, Southern Rhodesia unilaterally declared independence from the United Kingdom as the state of Rhodesia.

SAFARI HUNTING SINCE WWII

1949
The Government controlled hunting scheme was introduced by District Commissioner Errol Button in Nsefu’s chiefdom, Luangwa Valley, with 50% of revenue going to the chiefdom.

1958
In 1958 Peter Hankin took over the hunting from the government scheme as a contractor under his company, Central African Safaris

1962
The government-controlled hunting scheme was abolished, and hunting-safaris privatized.

1963
Luangwa Safaris started up by Peter Hankin and Norman Carr
Hankin 3.png


1968
The categories of protected areas were reduced from four to two: National Park (category II of IUCN) and Game Management Area (GMA) (category VI of IUCN).

1969
I open up the south Munyamadz Corridor to hunting, assisted by Peter Capstick on his first African hunt.
Mexican safari Peter Capstick 1969.jpg

Ignacio Guajardo (his hunting partner not in pic) and family with Peter Capstick on the Munyamadzi River, Luangwa Valley at Nyampala camp. The tusks averaged 82 pounds. (Picture by Ian Manning)

1971
32 GMAs created by statutory instrument selected purely as areas needing recognition and protection

1979
The last black rhino was shot on safari in the north Munyamadzi Corridor by my friend and client, Dr. Bill Faeth. The black rhino became extinct c.1993 in Zambia (a few subsequently reintroduced).

Bill Faeth 1979  full pic.jpg


1988
The Wildlife Act of 1988 creates the Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA)

1993
The Game Management Declaration Order, Statutory Instrument No. 67, proclaimed 35 GMAs, the 32 from 1971 added to by three others. The GMAs, beginning under the parastatal ZAWA, are now aggressively used to extract income from customary land from hunting safaris. The 36 GMAs are part of about 40 chiefdoms. Customary land amounts to 22% of the country, the 288 chiefdoms 52% of the country.

1998
The National Parks and Wildlife Policy of 1998 provided for the development of privately owned game ranches.

2015
The Wildlife Ac No. 14 of 2015 replaced ZAWA with the Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW) in the Ministry of Tourism & Arts.

All hunting is conducted in the GMAs or on private leasehold land registered as game ranches.

Books

A full history of hunting and conservation in Zambia (and briefly, with coverage of Botswana and eight other African countries) appears in Volume I of my book God’s Country, while Volume II contains the full plan for the future. From this volume, I have produced the Guardians of Eden Manual, provided free in epub format so that Zambians will be empowered to make the necessary changes - particularly in the chiefdoms that have declined in area and wildlife. It is free. In addition, the second edition of my book With a Gun in Good Country is available, plus my other books.

https://about.me/i.p.a.manning/getstarted

https://www.kobo.com/ca/en/search?query=I.P.A.+Manning
 

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Ian Manning

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Ian Manning

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Ian Manning

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A short Zambia hunting history

1 Ivory hunters


By 1870 the slave export trade, allied with the ivory trade and paid for in firearms and calico, massively reduced the elephant population in Africa. For example, in the Zambezi and Luangwa valleys, one of the Zambezi muzungu (mixed race) traders, Texeira de Sousa, ran a stable of about three hundred elephant hunters north of the Zambezi and had great difficulty finding bulls with heavy ivory. In 1882 Chief Lewanika of the Barotse gave George Westbeech his exclusive hunting concession in the Machili area. Between 1871–1888, Westbeech exported 20,000 to 30,000 pounds of ivory. Overall, the slaughter of elephant in Africa - supplying only the London market - was estimated to be 47,000 head annually between the years 1850 to 1890. Including those wounded would mean that over the 40 years, hunters killed 2.25 million.

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Dance of an elephant hunter

With the takeover of the territory and the war against the slavers by the BSA Company, elephant populations recovered, but by 1921 native hunters armed by the BSA Company and supplied the necessary ammunition killed 3,992 elephant, supposedly for crop protection. This commercial elephant exploitation brushed aside African conservation laws, directly threatening their conservation stability - as revealed by the Bemba saying: "Finding one bee's nest is good fortune, because honey is a blessing, finding two is better still, but persisting in your search for bees' nests that are never plentiful and finding three – that is the work of witchcraft: it is the influence of greed, for which the powers of Evil will find a way to punish you."

2 Elephant control

With the considerable increase in elephant numbers in the 1930s, the British Provincial Administration contracted experienced hunters to deal with marauding animals, particularly elephant. The prominent hunters were E.C. ('Anzac') Mills - later a White Hunter and member of the East African Professional Hunters Association, Henry Rangeley, H.L. Hall - who had farmed in the Petauke district, Charlie Ross, D.G. Lancaster, and Captain R.W.M. Langham, MC.
An elephant killed Ross on 29 May 1938 in Kamwendo's country, a section of the escarpment bordering part of the present South Luangwa National Park. He lies buried in the old Mpika Hunters' Graveyard, a cemetery I cared for during my time in charge of Bangweulu in 1973-1976, and briefly, in 2003. Next to him lies Anzac Mills, who died in 1946.

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Old Hunters' Cemetery Mpika before 2003 (I.M.)

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After a clean-up (I.M.)


3 The first professional safari hunter (PH)
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With the British South Africa Chartered Company colonization of tribal territory from 1889 to 1924, native hunters, often elders of elite elephant hunting guilds - the aChiwinda – guided big-game hunters. One of the finest of these was Chief Luchembe's chief executioner, Chumamaboko (arms of iron). F. H. Melland - a nephew of Prime Minister Asquith - arrived on foot at Mpika in October 1901 to take up his post with the BSA Company as an assistant Native Collector. He recruited Chuma as his hunter (fundi) and scoured the nearby Bangweulu Swamps and Luangwa Valley for good tuskers, shooting a 116 pounder on his first hunt. At the time in N.E. Rhodesia, a £50 license allowed one to kill most species, including elephant and rhino, with a £2 license fee for a general bag.

4 White Hunters

The Edwardian era (1901-1910) saw the flowering of the White Hunter-controlled safari business in Africa, though some individual sportsmen continued to make their own arrangements, as Melland did with Chumamaboko. In 1902 in Kenya, the pioneer White Hunters, the Hill brothers Clifford and Harold, began conducting lion safaris on their ranch in the Machakos area of Kenya. I have a letter from Harold Hill in his eighties, announcing that with self-rule coming to Kenya, he was moving to South Africa. From 1902, White Hunters - now called professional hunters (PH), and of any race - expanded in number. Those prominent in Northern Rhodesia - with a listing of some of their clients, are described below:

1. J.E. Hughes (d.1935)
ec5b3639-157d-4126-8f51-ee7a51e63e5a.jpg

J.E Hughes, c 1905.

Between 1911 and the outbreak of WWI, Hughes lived and guided the following hunting clients in the Bangweulu swamps and floodplains: <link>

Colonel C.F. Blane
The Earl of Kingston and Captain R.D. Waterhouse
Captain Graham Sandeman and W.A. Conduitt
Captain and Mrs. S.H. Christy
P.F. Haddow
J. Todd

As I wrote in 'Where the Water Meets the Sky':

Hughes landed at Chinde, at the mouth of the Zambezi, on 18 August 1901, with £9 and two good rifles. After three years in the service of the BSA Company in North-East Rhodesia (later amalgamated with North-West Rhodesia to form Northern Rhodesia) as a Native Commissioner at Nawalya in the Luangwa Valley for two years, and then Fort Roseberry (now Mansa) in the Bangweulu for a further two, he moved into the swamps and floodplains as a White Hunter and trader in otter skins until the outbreak of WWI. Here he took on the massively important task of setting up a 400-mile dugout canoe transport network through the Bangweulu, transporting Allied war supplies in WWI to the front in East Africa. His book Eighteen Years on Lake Bangweulu, published in 1933, is a natural history classic. In 1919, Hughes left Bangweulu to settle in Port Elizabeth.

2. Len Vaughan (1900-1989)
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In 1922 Len guided Prince Yussouf Kamal (1982-1967) of Egypt and Prince Omar Halim of Turkey.

Len first arrived at Mazabuka in the Kafue aged 20 on Boxing Day 1920. Len was the founder of the Kafue National Park in 1950 and former owner of Lochinvar Ranch before it became the Lochinvar National Park.

3. Ben Woest (d.1934)

Woest guided the Second Duke of Westminster, Hugh Grosvenor (1879-1953) - and - other clients and later managed his ranch south of Mazabuka. He had first come to the country in 1901. He guided Anzac Mill's client Mr. Weatherall in making the film, Livingstone. In later years he became a prominent cattle rancher.

4. Anzac Mills (d.1946)

Anzac guided the Maharaja of Bikaner and Mr. Weatherall in 1934; and Alastair Faed in 1937. He lived at Kanona, south of Mpika, where he had a hotel that became very popular with troop convoys in WWII. This was his base from which he conducted hunting safaris.

A poem by E. C. ("Anzac") Mills - "The hunters and pioneers."

Mangled and torn by a lion
Ripped by a buffalo cow
Tossed by a wounded Tembu (elephant)
Nothing much left to them now.
But they can tell you a story.

That turns the blood to fire,
Tales of the far lone places
Lands of the huntsman's desire.
Stories of Roan and of Sable
Rhino and Hippo: and more
Of long long nights made sleepless
By the prowling lions roar.
Tell you of far flung dambos
Where the countless game herds roam
Tell you of broad deep rivers
Where the Saurians have their home.
Of age old paths through the jungle
Made by the mighty beasts
Tell you of war drums beating
Stories of cannibal feasts.

Tell you of small black people
Who dwell in the forest glades
Where never a ray of sunshine
Pierces the deep dark shades.
Tell you of many a hunter
Who facing a charge has stood
Far far away in the bushland
And died as a white man should,
Giving his life for another's
Playing the game to the end
Tell me what death can be better
Than dying to save a friend.
Then here's so the band of hunters
Prospectors, pioneers.

Who leaving their joys of the homelands
Battled throughout the years
Blazing the trail to far places
Taking their lives in their hands
Asking for help from no man.
Taming this great dark land.
When history comes to be written
Down the far vale of years
Their memory shall live forever
The hunters and pioneers.


5 Professional safari hunters (PH) 1949-1973 - the Golden Years

In 1949 the Government Controlled Hunting Scheme was also established by Errol Button, the Lundazi DC, on the land lying under the Nsefu Native Authority, the scheme run by Bert Schultz. Barry Shenton of the Game Department was the other main PH.

ea65c145-f786-470b-871e-78c7c12284ff.png

Barry Shenton and Bert Schultz

baf8fccf-aa0b-49f5-bc7b-acc40463ead0.jpg

Barry Shenton, DC Errol Button, O'Brien (1950)


In 1958 Peter Hankin took over the hunting from the government scheme as a contractor under his Company, Central African Safaris. Five years later, the government privatized the hunting, awarding the concession to Peter Hankin and Norman Carr's Luangwa Safaris Ltd. Their first apprentice was Bryan Smith, and their PH, Angus MacLagan. Later they were joined by Joe Joubert from Tanganyika. I set up a new camp and hunted for them in 1969 in the south Munyamadzi Corridor of Chief Nawalya's country.


ca568482-f9af-48a4-8fe5-6405e494a627.png

Peter Hankin, ? , Norman Carr

Peter was taken from his tent by a lion in 1974. He had only just returned to the country from a stint in Kenya.

Ron Kidson and Keith Rouse of Zambia Safaris began hunting in 1964, recruiting Major Alan North in Kenya as its first PH. At the end of the 1970 hunting season, Luangwa and Zambia safaris merged as Amalgamated Safaris, with a Belgian, Arnold Callens, a major shareholder.

90667511-8e2d-412f-9389-2a11ce12839a.jpg

Amalgamated Safaris P.H.s. owners and staff (1972)

Top: Fico Vidale, Tony Moore, Rolf Rowher, Norman Carr, Rolf Kidson, I.M., ?, Lionel
Potgieter
Middle: Werner Brach, Joe Joubert, Johnny Roxburgh, Granville Potgieter, Dougie
Stevens, ?, John Knowles,
Bottom: Adrian Carr, Paul Nielsen, ?, Franz Coupe, Reg Potgieter, Siegie Rautenbach,?,
Arnold Callens

Ron Kidson was instrumental in forming the Professional Hunters' Association of Zambia (PHAZA) in 1965, the first meeting attended by Keith Rouse (his partner in Zambia Safaris), Carr and Hankin of Luangwa Safaris, and the Director of the Department of Game and Fisheries, Bill Steele. I later joined as member No. 12. PHAZA's principal role was to vet future applicants for professional hunter licenses and regulate P.H. affairs to maintain hunting standards and ethics. In the 1980s, David Frost served as chairman. In 2014 it had in the order of 75 full members; in 2022, 61.

The imposition of the National Parks and Wildlife Act (No. 57) of 1968 completely centralized control and management of wildlife in the country by vesting the ownership of protected species - and the game needing a license to hunt - in the President. This legislation must have caused Johnny Uys to resign from the Game Department (he had been the warden of the Luangwa Command for a few years after 1966). Johnny then joined Zambia Safaris as a professional hunter for one season, guiding the baseball great, Ted Williams. President Kaunda then appointed him Chief Game Warden of Zambia. After a year he left the country. In 1973 he was killed by an elephant in Rhodesia.

38ef8653-0d36-43d1-b236-4da874b6dfdc.png

Ted Williams and Johnny Uys in 1969

6 The Current Situation

Game Management Areas (GMA) are set in some of the 288 chiefdoms of Zambia and occupy 22% of the country. They are now hunting concessions. The chiefdoms have been reduced from 72% of the country at independence in 1964, to 52% in 2022. The GMAs still take up the 22%.

The Wildlife Ac No. 14 of 2015 replaced the parastatal, ZAWA, with the Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW)

*Note
For the full story, see Section V: The landgrab Way in God's Country: Vol. I - Plunderers of Eden and Vol. II - Guardians of Eden. The FREE chiefdoms' manual is available on Kobo in ePub 3, and in PDF. God's Country will in 2022 appear in hardback at Ingram Spark.
 
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Happy Myles

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Mr Manning,
Once again I wish to thank you for your contributions to this forum. I knew almost nothing about Zambia including its animals before my first adventure there around fifty years ago. Reading your books and comments here have fit many pieces to my puzzle. It was the second African country I hunted after one safari in Zimbabwe. I ended up spending about a 100 days there over a two year period. Now at the age of 83, reading your comments and gazing at your photos buts a lump in my throat and wonderful memories flood my mind. Since then I have hunted all over Africa pretty much annually. I noticed a young Toney Moore in one of your photos. I hunted with him a couple times in Tanzania. I urge you to continue contributions . Thank you again and kindest regards
 

Ian Manning

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Bwana Hunting Hitman, Happy Myles & ThumbsUp,
Thank you all for your kind appreciation of a bit of hunting history of Northern Rhodesia and Zambia.

I knew and worked with some wonderful people in much of Africa from the early 1960s up until my last safari as a PH in 2005. Yes, Happy Myles, I went on a busman's holiday safari in 1979 with Tony Moore in the Munyamadzi Corridor of the Luangwa Valley (Luawata). I had accompanied my friend and client Dr. Bill Faeth - gone now, hunting the last Black Rhino on license. Like Bill, the indigenous Black rhino of Zambia are now no more. I hope you have recorded those numerous country hunts of yours? A safari hunter can give us much pleasure. I once tracked lion with David Petzal of Field & Stream magazine in the Kalahari. Afterwards, he wrote in his column:

"Sling misuse can have even more serious consequences. Many years ago, I was on the trail of a highly irritated lion in the Kalahari Desert of Botswana, .375 slung over my shoulder. Ian Manning, the professional hunter whose job it was to keep me from becoming lion poop, said, “David, do you really think the bloody lion is going to wait for you to unsling your bloody rifle before he bites you in your bloody a–e?” I had offered to fight Manning the day before when he said my rifle looked like it belonged to a French nobleman, but there was no doubt he was making sense about the sling."

Again, thank you all for the encouraging words.
Yours aye,
Ian
 

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375 H&H brass...

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