Wet Tan Versus Dry Tan

Discussion in 'Taxidermy' started by wzf0001, Feb 20, 2016.

  1. wzf0001

    wzf0001 New Member

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    I've read everything I can find on the subject of Wet Tan vs Dry Tan, a bit that I could fine here on AH and a lot around the web. It seems like the general consensus is that they generally are both good tanning methods (nearly split down the middle with preference) UNTIL you bring "African Taxidermy" in to the mix; it seems that the general reputation is that dry tanning in Africa is a bad idea. I will be on a hunt in a few weeks and have been working with Highveld Taxidermy for the dip/pack and shipping. They also offer a dry tan option that would save me a fair amount of money eliminating dip costs and lighter shipping weight. I'd be curious to know if any one here has used the dry tan method and how the result turned out. I am not willing to sacrifice the quality of the mount to save but if the general "African Taxidermy Reputation" is prevailing over the truth that a reputable dry tan can be just as successful as a wet tan then I would consider that route. Thanks in advance for the feedback.
     

  2. The Artistry of Wildlife

    The Artistry of Wildlife SPONSOR Since 2014 AH Elite

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    I prefer my tanneries tanning, and sure a dry tan IS just as good as a wet tan , if the dry tan IS mounted within a year of the tanning being done. I do wet tans as when the skin is tumbled the last process I don't get as much dermis loss around the ears and eyes. And wet tans are already soaked up I don't have to deal with that part of it.
    If a client of mine has pre tanned skin, I guarantee nothing.
    I do not know if they will soak up the way I want them to.
    If they will have enough stretch and softness after wetting to them up to mount with the same quality as I am used to.
    Don't know how well they will hold a stitch, how many holes will they put in them during the process.

    I have never see or dealt with their tanning so I cannot tell you if it's any good or if it's bad.
    It's chance I would not take with my trophies unless they sent me a tanned cape to try ....
     

  3. buck wild

    buck wild SILVER SUPPORTER AH Fanatic

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    There are lots of horror stories on Africa tanned skins- I'm sure there are good palces over there but it's a big gamble.
     

  4. jeff

    jeff AH Legend

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    With some tanneries there is no difference in the process they just don't dry tumble and do any drum sanding. I've mounted with both and didn't see much difference, I usually prefer dry tan as I don't have to keep as much in the freezers.
     

  5. buck wild

    buck wild SILVER SUPPORTER AH Fanatic

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    Yes but I assume Jeff you are talking about American tanneries. The Poster was asking about having his African skins dry tanned in Africa. The consensus is that is a risky endeavor. Another taxidermist friend of mine had a few tanned in Africa because he was misled by the PH that there was some type of quarantine in the area that required it versus salt,dip and ship. Even being a taxidermist he was unable to work with or even save the hides once they arrived in the States. The American tannery had a hard time distinguishing between his dry/salt hides and the "tanned" ones until he went up there and told them which capes were supposedly tanned. Once he tried to re hydrate and work with them, they began to rip and there was zero stretch.
     

  6. jeff

    jeff AH Legend

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    buck, he seemed to me not asking whether to have them tanned but rather wet versus dry. I also recommend strongly to have tanning done here at the tannery of your taxidermist's choice.
     

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