Understanding The Term "High Fenced Hunting"

Tam Dl

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Often times in the spots context when there is a claim that it can't be figure out what is or isn't ethical, and that we all need to hang together for the sake of the industry or sport, we are watching an attempted transfer from higher to the lower standards.

Hunting is an oddity because the code was adapted from a chivalric code, and that is almost completely gone in the realms in which it originally applied. I don't think the average outsider sees the difference between items under discussion, and just mini gunning animals from a plane.

The fact that the underlying moral principles are pretty much in disrepute has led to adoption of ideas, like conservation, habitat preservation, and natural diversity of species. But that seems like a goner also.

Seems as though the main remaining justifications are choice and free enterprise. Will see how that works out. Hasn't been a good few years for one of them. I think someone with the spirit for it should start thinking up how we can justify hunting on "equity" grounds. You always want to put some lead on a moving target.
 

Country

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I have no problem with high fence hunting...some people might just want the meat and dont have the time to put in the work or some other valid reason, but why do all the high fence hunters cut off the ear tags and drag the deer away from the fence and take hero pics to try to pass it off as a free range trophy? That is what creates so much negativity for it.
 

Zambezi

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I don't know if your post was tongue in cheek / lazy / uninformed.

99.99999% of animals taken behind a fence have no tags, are not shot near a fence and the work put in is usually just as hard as free range.

I would say what creates "so much negativity" is posts and attitudes such as yours.
 

Tam Dl

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Maybe I overthought it, you could as Country suggest simply market it as a version of "you pick" strawberries.

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There is a stolen valour aspect to it.
 

Zambezi

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There may be a VERY FEW people who post pics of animals that have been moved for photos. I would hazard a guess that neither of you have hunted high fence in Africa and know not of what you are talking. If you think you walk up to the animal of your choice and bash it over the head with a stick then I suggest you leave the keyboard alone and get on a plane and come and try.

Stolen valour my hairy ass!!

It is precisely this type of attitude that creates division in the hunting fraternity!
 

Tam Dl

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"99.99999% of animals taken behind a fence have no tags, are not shot near a fence" and are not species of "deer" native to South Africa. Is his example from Africa?

As far as work put in it is quite possible quality operations in Africa provide the same experience one way or another, but that may not be the strongest selling point. I have a property with bear, moose, whitetail deer. It is all free range, there are no fences anywhere, etc... I sure hope the average sport on a safari is not faced with what I face to get at the game. You would be running them ragged.
 

Tam Dl

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You might want to work a little harder on appropriate divisions. As I see it, you are proud of what you do. A guy says he has seen something with deer that does not pass his smell test. I call it stolen valour since they are trying to pretend to be something they are not. You jump in and say that rarely happens (at not where you work/hunt) and suggest people should try to hang together.

That is like someone decrying poaching; your getting your shorts in a knot because you are not a poacher; someone points out a poacher; and you go "why can't we all get along". I think your better play would be to call it what it is.
 

Tam Dl

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Was looking at SCI rules. How does this work in practice?

The animals hunted must have freely resided on the property on which they are being hunted for at least six months, or longer.

along with this:

The animals hunted must be part of a breeding herd that is a resident on the hunted property.


I can imagine scenarios...
 

Zambezi

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And as I said previously in this thread, there are very very few operations that are as you and Country describe. Those operations are called out for their BS operations and it is up to the "hunter" if they want to come over and beat it over the head. BUT to decry an entire industry for one or two rotten eggs is disingenuous at best!

Furthermore you cheapen every single hunter that has worked very hard for their trophies as well as denigrating all high fence operations that provide quality hunts. It is lazy, uninformed and unhelpful.

Trying to "call out" bad operators and a handful of small endowed men that want to brag with their trophy they beat over the head by denigrating all high fence operations is like screaming "poacher" every time you see a hunter with a gun. And I AM calling it like it is.

Get on a plane and come and see. Armchair "African hunters" should rather listen and learn before they speak...
 

Zambezi

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Was looking at SCI rules. How does this work in practice?

The animals hunted must have freely resided on the property on which they are being hunted for at least six months, or longer.

along with this:

The animals hunted must be part of a breeding herd that is a resident on the hunted property.

I can imagine scenarios...
This is exactly how it works! If you understood or had been to a high fence operation you would know this. Do you actually think that the operator goes out and buys 100 animals and then shoots 100 animals every season then goes out and buys more for the next season????????????

YES, there are "put and take" operations and they make up probably less than 2-3% of the industry. Feel free to call them out (I'll even join you) but show some discernment.

As for the put and take operations they are there because there is a market for men with tiny members and low self esteem.

Lastly, not that it matters, I do agree with the SCI rules in this instance but who actually made SCI the be all and end all of what happens in African hunting? SCI is for the hunters that pack as many tape measures as bullets.
 

Frederik

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I will and have enjoyed all the hunting I had behind high fence on a lot of these properties the game is much more switched on than in wide open areas 3 months down the season. This gives you good practise on your hunting skills, stalking and tracking. Yes there are those that shoot mostly or all from vehicles but they miss most of the fun trying to outplay your prey.

Recently and have seen before good number of footage where it happens in Tanzania even if it is against the law BTW.

I have also shot game from the vehicle but rather do it on foot, fridge needs filling up and I'm on the back of the vehicle and it is allowed and legal fridge gets filled. But going after specific specie for a trophy on a large track of land fence or no fence is good fun.

On most bushveld game farms that are fenced a specific animal for a trophy as a big chance of eluding you if that was not the case every hunter would go back with a 60" kudu bull. In hunting there is a good deal of luck involved fence or no fence. The luck does turn most of the times if you put more effort into though.
 

Kenneth McMillan

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I mostly hunt free range but will hunt behind a high fence if that's what the outfitters provide.
 

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