Trophy Hunting May Drive Extinctions, Due to Climate Change

Discussion in 'News & Announcements' started by Hallgeir Gravråk, Jun 2, 2019.

  1. Hallgeir Gravråk

    Hallgeir Gravråk AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2018
    Messages:
    118
    Video/Photo:
    101
    Likes Received:
    223
    Location:
    Norway
    Member of:
    SCI Nordic Chapter
    Hunted:
    South Africa, Namibia
  2. BRICKBURN

    BRICKBURN AH ENABLER SUPER MODERATOR CONTRIBUTOR LIFETIME TITANIUM BENEFACTOR AH Ambassador

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Messages:
    21,713
    Video/Photo:
    411
    Likes Received:
    14,320
    Hunted:
    Namibia, South Africa, Botswana, Mozambique, Canada, USA, Mexico, England
    Suspicion confirmed.
    I'd suggest a name change soon: National Enquirer Geographic.
    The Sky is falling. Climate change is due to trophy hunting.
     

  3. markm

    markm SILVER SUPPORTER AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2015
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    133
    My be they should apply this to the humans
     

  4. Jeffrey

    Jeffrey AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2019
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    109
    Location:
    Louisiana / Zimbabwe
    Member of:
    NRA
    Hunted:
    Zimbabwe, Louisiana, Mississippi
    The CRAZY thing is that half way through the article, the lead researcher says that hunting can be a powerful force for conservation. Polemic headlines generate better click bait.
     
    Hank2211 likes this.

  5. Hank2211

    Hank2211 AH ENABLER GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    2,617
    Video/Photo:
    128
    Likes Received:
    5,286
    Member of:
    SCI, DU, Pheasants Forever
    Hunted:
    Canada, United States, Zimbabwe, South Africa (Eastern Cape; Northern Cape; North West Province, Natal, Mpumalanga, Limpopo), Namibia, Cameroon, Benin, Ethiopia, Argentina
    One of the advantages (one of the few advantages, in my view) of record books is that we can have some idea of what is actually happening on the ground. And what's happening is that new records are being entered onto the record books all the time. Record books aren't a complete answer of course - lots of bigger animals were likely never entered in the past (but many are likely still not entered today) - but they are useful in demonstrating trends. And the trends are positive.

    I too was a bit surprised to see that - somehow snuck through the editing process likely. But it is a fact. And to the extent that the AH community is a reasonable sample of hunting nuts, the trend is definitely towards hunting older animals. Everyone wants a dugga boy rather than a bull from a herd. We are not the problem!
     
    ActionBob and rinehart0050 like this.

  6. Bailey Vinac

    Bailey Vinac AH Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2018
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    25
    This article was from November 2017 so is a bit old. Although the author buts a slightly negative twist on trophy hunting, all the professors/researchers seem to support it. Most hunters do only target the older males, which has been demonstrated on here multiple times.
     
    Timbo likes this.

  7. CBH Australia

    CBH Australia AH Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2019
    Messages:
    344
    Video/Photo:
    2
    Likes Received:
    196
    Location:
    NSW Australia
    Member of:
    Sporting Shooters Association Australia, Africa Hunting website!!!
    Hunted:
    Australia
    I’m not even gonna read it. I thought trophy hunting, game management and the money raised all aids conservation of various species . It also is a thriving industry generating income for countries that may not have much to sell otherwise. Most of hose dollars are coming from wealthy people so what goes around comes around. I’m not Wealthy in my country but comfortable and working.
     
    Timbo likes this.

  8. mark-hunter

    mark-hunter AH Fanatic

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2016
    Messages:
    786
    Video/Photo:
    21
    Likes Received:
    647
    Hunted:
    Namibia - Kalahari, Namibia - Khomas highland

  9. Rick Cox

    Rick Cox SILVER SUPPORTER AH Fanatic

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2015
    Messages:
    777
    Video/Photo:
    65
    Likes Received:
    791
    Location:
    Armstrong British Colombia
    Hunted:
    Namibia, South Africa, British Colombia Ca.
    Interesting. And no, the article does not suggest that trophy hunting is related to climate change...
     

  10. Timbo

    Timbo AH Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2013
    Messages:
    509
    Video/Photo:
    33
    Likes Received:
    696
    Member of:
    BGRC PFRC & SSAA
    Hunted:
    Australia (WA & NT), Zimbabwe, Zambia
    Just as an aside, but IF trophy hunting is ever driven to the wall, then the only option operators have left to compensate, is to jack up the daily rates sky-high for photographic and "eco" tourists!! With their wallets hit hard - then they'll scream!!
     

  11. mark-hunter

    mark-hunter AH Fanatic

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2016
    Messages:
    786
    Video/Photo:
    21
    Likes Received:
    647
    Hunted:
    Namibia - Kalahari, Namibia - Khomas highland
    Model of India, and model of Kenya - work! Eco tourism is not really expensive there.
    Nobody questions them. They exist for decades! Without sign of any change.
    So non hunting model, (non consumptive), eco, should be considered as successful model.

    The result of this models, is different type of tourists visiting national parks, and overall less numbers of wild animals in the country, in the wilderness. It is also politically correct model.
    Even hunters, world wide have nothing to say against national parks.

    On the other hand... South African, Namibian models... game ranching, CBL issues...World wide Hunting in general, the ball is always on our, hunters, part of the field. We know the story, been discussing daily.. No need to go into details.

    Tour operators can simply turn attention to other type of clients.
    game ranchers in case of trophy hunting getting to the wall, can turn to photo safari, on reduced numbers of animals, or to cattle ranching. We know then the long term outcome. (total reduction of bio diversity, and when it gets there - its too late, example is kenyan white rhino...)
     

  12. Timbo

    Timbo AH Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2013
    Messages:
    509
    Video/Photo:
    33
    Likes Received:
    696
    Member of:
    BGRC PFRC & SSAA
    Hunted:
    Australia (WA & NT), Zimbabwe, Zambia
    Thanks for that info, I've added a little more to the ken of my knowledge on the subject. So in the long run - an inevitable bio diversity disaster? The eventual, total, eradication of all wildlife outside designated Nat Parks. Then human pressure is increased on those remaining havens with the wildlife with no where left to go - just like that's currently happening in the palm oil industry.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019

  13. mark-hunter

    mark-hunter AH Fanatic

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2016
    Messages:
    786
    Video/Photo:
    21
    Likes Received:
    647
    Hunted:
    Namibia - Kalahari, Namibia - Khomas highland
    Its not exactly "info", its only my personal view.

    The first model, India, Kenya, national parks, etc - financed by governments.
    2nd model, Namibia, RSA, financially self sustaining, private enterprise, and still growing industry.

    There is a North American, and European approach that is also successful, and different from both of these. Speaking from hunters perspective, of course. Where many of large game is still very much huntable. Example is Bison... on both continents, almost extinct. huntable today.
     

  14. Andrew Robbins

    Andrew Robbins New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2019
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Limpopo, South Africa
    Hunted:
    South Africa
    Including hunters and poachers into the same category is equivalent to comparing pharmaceuticals with drug cartels.

    I also hate it when so called Conservation Groups say hunting revenue is " siphoned away by corruption and mismanagement". I can say from experience that every penny from hunting goes into running costs such as feed, fencing, vet bills, anti-poaching etc... And if there is any left, the farmer usually uses this to expand his ranch or acquire more game.

    Another uninformed article full of bias!
     

Share This Page

 
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice