TANZANIA: Double Dugga Boy With Bullet Safaris!

Rum Runner

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Greetings from Tanzania. Had a fantastic safari with Bullet Safaris in Rungwa, Tanzania. Eight animals in eight days! Including double Dugga Boys harvested within 30 seconds of each other. Details and pictures on the way!

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cpr0312

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Awesome, congrats! Look forward to the report and pics(y)
 

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Reno-Amsterdam-Kilimanjaro; Applied for the firearms permit to transit through Amsterdam a month in advance. I waited, then waited, and waited some more...the approval came through two days before departure. Apparently that's not unusual, but its worth posting here that I had a lot of help from Jennifer at Express Travel (Express Travel worked with me through the entire trip, and they did a fantastic job!).

Spent two nights in Arusha to help acclimate. I highly recommend an extra night in country before the safari. The charter flight to the bush went smooth and is unremarkable. I was met by Nathan Askew and Hilary Daffi, who would be my PH. I felt very welcome, and all was ready to go. The camp was quite nice, with individual canvas style tents and flushing toilets. The safari begins!

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Rum Runner

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8/13/19; Day One
Day begins at 4:30. Fruit and coffee and we load up. Its me, Hillary, the driver, one scout/government man, and three trackers. Driving and looking for buffalo sign. Hillary’s plan is to look for tracks but, if we see a herd, we follow it.

Around 9:00, we cut some tracks of a buffalo herd and follow on foot. The sign was from this morning, and encouraging. However, the tracks went on, we stopped because the herd crossed over into a park where we can’t hunt. “They are damn lucky!” says Hillary.

Drive on and suddenly see a large herd off to our right. We jump out and give chase. Its a herd of about 120. They had seen us, and the truck, so it was cat and mouse, spot and stock. After about a half hour we are glassing the herd, who are standing in a thicket, remarkable quiet for such a large herd. We are looking for a shooter, when something darts from right to left across my field of view. Hillary says “That’s a big Reedbuck, lets take him”. So, we set up the sticks, but the Reedbuck darts further to the left. We shift and set up the sticks again and I have him in my scope. I’ll never forget that view, the reedbuck looking back at us through the tall grass; the moment froze in time. I could see his head and just the line of his back. “Shoot”, and I put the sight just where his chest is and pull the trigger. The mighty .416 Rigby goes "Boom"! Two jumps and he’s down. First African animal and I'm grateful! “Great shot” says Hillary…and maybe it was, though I still feel lucky because I've practiced off sticks and confidence in that ability is so-so. High fives and hand shakes (I think they were just as happy as me, truly). One hundred twenty yards, both shoulders. He’s a monster: 12 ½ inches. More pics, more handshakes and high fives and we load him up in the truck. Maybe I’m better off the sticks than I thought…

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Hilary and crew like my rifle (.416 Rigby, CZ 550 American Safari), a lot, and there is much discussion about it.

After lunch of cold buffalo steaks, sandwiches and fruit, we're off again. A few uneventful stalks on zebra. We later passed on a warthog with a broken tusk, a decision I'll regret.

At 5:30 we spot a hartebeest from the road and Hillary says he a good one, lets take a shot. The sticks went up and someone (not sure who) helped me steady by putting their shoulder on my left elbow. This was very helpful, and I squeeze the trigger. The shot felt good but I see dust in the background and I fear the worst. The hartebeest jumps up then lands on his chest, anchored. I did it. Second animal down. Had to put two more rounds in him before he expired. More high fives and the cameras come out again. This is a grand old boy! I had hit slightly low, but broke both shoulders; another decent shot. It was late in the day and the photo kind of sucks:

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cpr0312

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Heck of a first day!!
 

Art Lambart II

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Great report so far, keep it comming
 

CAustin

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I’m likening this report! Keep it coming sir!
 

Ironhorse375

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Can’t wait to hear more!
 

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Nice report so far, glad you had a great trip - it was a pleasure working with you as well................
 

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8/14/19, day two

Left at 4:30 this morning to look for buff, warthog, and zebra.

One warthog gave us the slip, he just would not stand still. This turns out to be a pattern with all the shooter warthogs we saw.

While driving, cut fresh buffalo sign (a herd) and decide to pursue. This was a long hike through scrub and tall grass for four hours. We spent lots of time “shorting things out” (this is the term Hilary and the trackers used to try and figure out where the buffalo headed after milling around, grazing), and nearly gave up until we cut very fresh sign. Walking along, Marteen the tracker suddenly stops and points to a thicket. We crawl forward and, there they were, in quite slumber. Now, this is a large herd of 200 or more head, amazingly well hid and quiet. I had no idea how Marteen knew they were there because they made no sound. I probably would have barged right on in and busted everything up. These guys are astounding trackers, but there is something else at work here, a sixth sense. Their ability to track and spot game is nothing short of magic. The three trackers work as a team, two tracking and one man with his eye to the bush. They use this method while driving as well as on foot. Nice fellows, for sure, but they are every bit as deadly at the .416. When these guys are after you, its bad news!

After several minutes peering at them through the brush, we see no shooters, but our view was extremely limited. The buffalo finally caught wind of us and began to move. To get a better view of the herd, we decide to split up. While me and four others flank the moving herd, one tracker and the Scout (the government man) hold back and, at the right time, move slowly behind the herd and drive them past us. It worked perfectly. After waiting for about half an hour, the entire herd comes walking past. Not too fast, not too slow. These guys did a perfect job getting me a shot (something they will do repeatedly). I’m impressed and grateful. No shooters, but everyone did an outstanding job tracking and driving the herd.

Later in the afternoon we saw several hogs but none gave us a shot. Saw one shooter, we all saw it, but I couldn’t get it in my scope. Very frustrating for all.

On the way back to camp, we spot six zebra. I had a shot at one stallion and...I miss. Damn. He was pretty close too but somehow I shanked the shot. I learned that, when you take a shot, and no one says anything, it's bad news. The trip back to camp is quiet, and that evening the entire camp mood is somber. Strange, its my hunt but I'm beginning to feel like I let them down.
 

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I love it-eager for more pix and story!
 

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Left at 6:00 and within 20 minutes came across a herd of about 80 buffalo. Swirling wind made a stock difficult, but we kept out flanking them. Finally got in front of them and waited. Along comes a bull, presenting a decent shot, so I pull the trigger. No dead bull, no blood. Its like I was shooting blanks. Once again, no one said anything after the shot...a bad sign. No “slap” was heard. So, we decide to check the rifle. Dead on. I must have just screwed it up. We chased the herd a while longer but they went into the concession next door. “Were f#%$d!” says Hilary. The good news is, no blood, so I keep my tag. A long walk back to the truck.

Came across a group of baboons. We followed them in the truck. Each time we would stop, they would move. Never really got a shot so we gave it up.

Hilary and I had a talk and decide to change a few things. First of all, we agree to communicate more. Secondly, we decide to keep my scope on 4X. Third, I'm real confused on the soft/solid mix. Why were they asking me to load one soft in the chamber, then another soft, then two solids? The softs are A-Frames and spectacular bullets. I spent a fair amount of time loading and unloading bullets. Solid-soft, soft solid...ugh! If the A-Frames are good enough for the first shot, they should be good enough for the last shot I argue. Hilary agrees, and we ditch the solids.

The mood has turned from somber to downright depressing.

During lunch in the field, the Scout came over and, in slow but fairly good English says, "Anything can happen". This turns out to be the theme we stick to for the rest of the hunt.

Just a short while later we spot two baboons crossing the road. I jump out but we only had seconds. The sticks went up and, this time, I catch one in a tree. Boom! One dead baboon. Everyone is happy with the shot, especially me. Thanks to the baboon, their confidence in my shooting ability is restored.

Continued on for about an hour when Hilary spots two Dugga Boys. They heard the truck and spooked at 500 yards. We give chaise but no luck, they were long gone.

The baboon changes the entire mood of the camp for the better. Thanks Mr. Baboon!

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Side note:
Found out that, not only do we all eat what I shoot (we’ve all been eating the hartebeest since the 13th), but they’re hanging the meat for leopards. They use a trail cam to keep track of which leopard is which, how big their territory is, which cat hits which bate and such, and they keep detailed records. When a leopard client shows up, they are ready to hunt day one.
 

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Lmcquin

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Awesome reports and love reading them.

Had my bouts of misses for sure.


Can’t wait to read the rest of the report!!
 

Brent in Az

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That is fantastic hunting, in a game rich area. Cant wait to see those Buffalo.
 

huntermn15

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Loving the report, can't wait for the rest!
 

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Wake up this morning slightly down, but I would have felt much worse if I hadn’t shot the baboon. We leave around 6:30 and, within a half hour we see a buffalo running off to our right. Marteen says there were two; Dugga Boys! So, we get our stuff together and peruse on foot. We chase at a moderate pace, as the trackers took a minute or two to “sort things out”. Then the Marteen stops and points to a thicket. “You see him?” asks Hilary, “no” I reply, but the sticks are up and I’m locked and loaded. “Just relax” says Hilary. Then, very faintly, I see the swish of a black tail. I can just make out an outline and start to squeeze the trigger, then the bull moves to the left. We also move a few yards to the left and set up the sticks again. “You see him?”, “Just barely” I say. There are two, and they are both watching us. So we hold. And hold. And hold. Then they begin to move, and one gives me a left shoulder quarter shot. “Take him!” says Hilary excitedly. I’ll never forget the look of this beast in my scope. He holds for a few seconds and I squeeze a shot. Boom! “Good shot” says Hilary. “I think we got him!” I exclaim. Both Dugga Boys run to the left and we run after them. Through the thicket and onto one buffalo staring at us only fifteen yards away. “Shoot!” says Hilary. The buffalo takes off running to the right. I shoot. Three times. Hilary shoots once too. Then the buffalo falls after only going a few yards. At the same time, Marteen shouts “Two!”. Sure enough, there were two dead Dugga Boys. The first one I shot only ran about 20 yards and collapsed. The second buff was hanging around trying to figure out what was going on with his buddy when we surprised him. All six of us were jumping for joy. High fives. Hugs. Later, the driver at the truck said he could hear us celebrating. Hell, they could probably hear us celebrating back in Reno!

The first buff was shot through the heart and the right lung. The second had three holes in him, two were in the boil maker. The mighty .416 Rigby, and the Swift A-Frames, didn’t disappoint. They caused massive damage inside the bodies of the buffalos.

I gave everyone the afternoon off. The entire camp was celebrating. That baboon changed our luck. Anything can happen.

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Rum Runner

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Off after warthog and to find our zebra today. After about ½ hour we jump a herd of Zebra. One, a stallion, lags behind to check us out. That killed him. The sticks came out and I delivered one Swift A-Frame from the .416 in a quartering shot. Between the chest and left shoulder, and all the way through the boiler maker. He runs 10 yards and collapses. The cameras come out again and much celebration. This Zebra is absolutely stunning. No shadow stripes and vivid contrasts. Few scars as well; this is a trophy quality hide. I write Mary (the wife) with the news and pictures and she’s as excited as we are (before I left for Africa, she picked out a spot on the wall in the living room for a zebra hide).

We drop off the stallion and head out again looking for hogs. On the way out, we return to the double Dugga Boy site to retrieve the shooting sticks we left there. We notice two small trees that have a bullet hole through them. That explains the shape of the one Swift A-Frame that was retrieved; it had not mushroomed but was bent. Now its clear the 400 gr bullet passed through two small trees, then continued into the side of the buffalo!
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Both of these bullets were recovered from the second buffalo (the PH asked me to shoot a solid for the final cu de gras). The left is the Swift A Frame that went through the trees then into the buffalo. The right is a Barnes Banded solid shot only from 10 feet out, it could be reloaded.

Later in the afternoon we spot a boar and, I grab the .270, and we give a foot chase…but he clearly had made us and disappeared (as usual!). Just when the jig was up, Marteen spots a oribi about 200 yards in the distance. Now, I don’t know oribis from Adam, so I didn’t realize how small they are. Looking at him in the scope, I think he is 200 yards, he’s not, it’s more like 100 yards. So my first shot goes over his back. He darts to the left and stands still for a moment. This time I hold right on him and fire. Wack! He runs a few yards and stands still, clearly mortally wounded. Another shot to his chest and he’s finished. An 11 ½ incher; good size. Another beautiful animal and I decide to do a shoulder mount.

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Rum Runner

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Days 6 & 7 spent chasing around wart hogs (elusive little buggers) with no luck. We decide to ditch the hog hunting and move to another camp to look for Impala.

Day 8
Start the day at 6:00. After impala today. Drive out of camp for 50 yards and spot a Dugga boy standing quietly by the road. We stop, back up for a better look, and he immediately charges us. I mean a full on charge! Head swinging, slobber flying, running like he intended to kill us all. We start shouting and, just before he hits the truck, he veers off to the left and is gone! We all take a second to collect ourselves, laughing as the adrenalin wears off.

We spot all kinds of wildlife, but no impala. Until, 10:30 we spots a herd about 200 yards out.

A little side note here about our hunting party and how it worked every day. There was the driver, and the government scout, then me and Hilary standing in the back, and three trackers behind us. While we were driving, one tracker looked for sign on the left, one looked for sign on the right, and the center man and Hillary continually scanned the savanna for animals. This was very effective and amazing to watch. This teamwork continued on foot, with the Scout (the government man) an integral part of the team. Believe me, when this crew is after you, you're in trouble. Every bit as deadly as the .416. In this case, with the Impala, the driver spotted them!

Back to the hunt. We do a quick stalk, and the Impala herd seem aware of us but don’t scatter. “There, on the left” Hilary says. I see him in the scope, about 150 yards out, they are moving, but I don't have a good shot. They all run to the right and one buck stops at about 110 yards to give us another look, giving me a left quarter/shoulder shot. Bang! Hit! He hops a few yards and falls over dead. I hit him on the left shoulder. The .270 Barnes 3X doing devastating damage. The cameras come out again. Eight animals in eight days! Even though I missed a few shots, I did harvest five animals with one shot.

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This is the .270 Barnes Triple Shock at 110 yards with a muzzle velocity of 2800 fps. Perfect!

The hunt is over but I'm so grateful! Hilary Daffi (the PH) and crew were amazing. World class for sure, worth every penny and then some. They worked their tails off the first day, they worked their tails off the last day. Especially, when things looked slightly bleak, they held steady. Nathan Askew and crew set up a flawless hunt. I highly recommend Bullet Safaris!
 

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cpr0312

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Congrats on the buff!!! Wow 2 in same morning!!
 

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