Positive Article In Forbes About African Conservation & SCI

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https://www.forbes.com/sites/chrisd...lebration-comes-to-nashville/?sh=5c9aa09e6f53

If there’s a Super Bowl of the hunting world, it’s the annual Safari Club International convention. SCI is comprised of more than 50,000 members with 180 local chapters and affiliates across the globe. Come February 22, tens of thousands of hunters, guides, outfitters, gunmakers, wildlife artists, titans of industry, political leaders, celebrities, and average Joes will descend on Nashville, Tennessee, to celebrate their position atop the food chain and their shared love of all things hunting.

In the process, they’ll raise millions of dollars for conservation efforts that extend to the far corners of the globe where dollars from foreign hunters have given value to hundreds of game species and protected their habitats in the process.

History, on the other hand, is rife with examples of what happens when such economic incentives are removed because of hunting closures. Kenya is the most notable example of what follows hunting bans. Regulated hunting for elephants was ended there in 1973 and the vast herds were subsequently slaughtered en masse by poachers who no longer contended with hunter-funded anti-poaching teams. Wildlife disappears from the landscape as poachers snare, shoot, and poison anything that provides meat, threatens their livestock, and crops, or brings currency on the black market.

“The US is the source of the highest number of hunters visiting Tanzania,” says Elsie Kanza, an American-educated economist who serves as Tanzania’s ambassador to the U.S. “Hunting plays an important role in the world of conservation by sustaining our conserved areas which amount to about one-third of our entire country. This is done through a combination of providing anti-poaching funding and managing game populations so that we can have a balanced ecosystem which is critical to sustaining these world heritage destinations.”

A person may not like the act of hunting, but there is no sustainable way forward for many creatures great and small without it—especially across the African continent. The millions of dollars, pounds, and euros paid by American and other international hunters sustain a management system of carefully regulated hunting that serves as an opposing force to the indiscriminate killing of wildlife at the hands of meat, ivory, and rhino poachers, many of whom serve masters in Southeast Asia, forever the global hub for the illicit wildlife trade.

If not for hunters, species like the mountain nyala, a large spiral horned antelope found in the Ethiopian highlands, would have vanished decades ago. It’s not simply the money provided by hunters, but it’s the voice that they bring through groups like Safari Club International that echoes from Washington D.C. to Addis Ababa and other foreign capitals which advances science- based wildlife management on landscapes forever threatened by human encroachment and worse. The premise is founded in the simple fact that wildlife that provides value to people will endure. Those without such value—as the world has so commonly seen—are frequently sacrificed for other priorities.

arguments in a natural world awash in hyperbole.

Wander the endless aisles of the convention and you’ll find paintings and bronzes from the world’s most talented wildlife artists. There also will be immaculate firearms from the planet’s greatest gunmakers that are the result of thousands of hours of work by master engravers, the guns representing exquisite pieces of sporting art. Taxidermy displays here surpass anything you’ll see in America’s top natural history museums. Moreover, bespoke home furnishings and accoutrement that reinforce the outdoor lifestyle of so many patrons will be on display. Auctions for trips, gear, and custom goods are another mainstay of this convention. Finally, guides, outfitters, and professional hunters from some of the most remote regions of our planet will be ready to share what is special about their places, wildlife, and the experiences they offer.

Visit the convention and subsequently travel to the world’s great wildernesses and you will become a part of a growing global network of hunters and advocates who have seen first- hand the magic of wild places and creatures whose fate often hinges on support provided by hunters.

For many, that’s reason enough to be a part of the greatest hunting and conservation show on Earth.









It is refreshing to see something positive about African hunting and SCI. :)

Jim

Screen Shot 2023-02-08 at 8.11.58 AM.png
 
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Very good article. Will be interested to see if any other news organizations pick up on this piece in Forbes.
 
Read it (it's a short article), and bookmarked it. Thanks for posting.
 
Thank you for sharing this
 
Dorsey is one of the most successful members of the industry - and one of the most articulate.
 
I wasn’t expecting that type of article in Forbes. It’s great to see it was allowed to be published there. Thanks for posting.
 
Excellent
 
Dorsey is one of the most successful members of the industry - and one of the most articulate.
This made me ask myself why I don't know much about Chris Dorsey. A few Google clicks and now I do! Thanks @Red Leg

This is a 4-minute "About Chris Dorsey" that is definitely worth watching!
https://www.outdoorchannel.com/show/sporting-classics/videos/361363/meet-chris-dorsey/365647

This one is a 30-minute Forbes interview;
Chris Dorsey's 'Call To the Wild' Investment Results In Millions
 
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We do get some decent press from time to time. This one is excellent and what a testament to SCI and the big convention that is coming soon!
I am beyond excited to get to Nashville.
 
Finally, media portraying us as what we really are. This is like a fresh breath of air to be honest…
 
This is awesome! Thank you for posting it! (y)
 
https://www.forbes.com/sites/chrisd...lebration-comes-to-nashville/?sh=5c9aa09e6f53

If there’s a Super Bowl of the hunting world, it’s the annual Safari Club International convention. SCI is comprised of more than 50,000 members with 180 local chapters and affiliates across the globe. Come February 22, tens of thousands of hunters, guides, outfitters, gunmakers, wildlife artists, titans of industry, political leaders, celebrities, and average Joes will descend on Nashville, Tennessee, to celebrate their position atop the food chain and their shared love of all things hunting.

In the process, they’ll raise millions of dollars for conservation efforts that extend to the far corners of the globe where dollars from foreign hunters have given value to hundreds of game species and protected their habitats in the process.

History, on the other hand, is rife with examples of what happens when such economic incentives are removed because of hunting closures. Kenya is the most notable example of what follows hunting bans. Regulated hunting for elephants was ended there in 1973 and the vast herds were subsequently slaughtered en masse by poachers who no longer contended with hunter-funded anti-poaching teams. Wildlife disappears from the landscape as poachers snare, shoot, and poison anything that provides meat, threatens their livestock, and crops, or brings currency on the black market.

“The US is the source of the highest number of hunters visiting Tanzania,” says Elsie Kanza, an American-educated economist who serves as Tanzania’s ambassador to the U.S. “Hunting plays an important role in the world of conservation by sustaining our conserved areas which amount to about one-third of our entire country. This is done through a combination of providing anti-poaching funding and managing game populations so that we can have a balanced ecosystem which is critical to sustaining these world heritage destinations.”

A person may not like the act of hunting, but there is no sustainable way forward for many creatures great and small without it—especially across the African continent. The millions of dollars, pounds, and euros paid by American and other international hunters sustain a management system of carefully regulated hunting that serves as an opposing force to the indiscriminate killing of wildlife at the hands of meat, ivory, and rhino poachers, many of whom serve masters in Southeast Asia, forever the global hub for the illicit wildlife trade.

If not for hunters, species like the mountain nyala, a large spiral horned antelope found in the Ethiopian highlands, would have vanished decades ago. It’s not simply the money provided by hunters, but it’s the voice that they bring through groups like Safari Club International that echoes from Washington D.C. to Addis Ababa and other foreign capitals which advances science- based wildlife management on landscapes forever threatened by human encroachment and worse. The premise is founded in the simple fact that wildlife that provides value to people will endure. Those without such value—as the world has so commonly seen—are frequently sacrificed for other priorities.

arguments in a natural world awash in hyperbole.

Wander the endless aisles of the convention and you’ll find paintings and bronzes from the world’s most talented wildlife artists. There also will be immaculate firearms from the planet’s greatest gunmakers that are the result of thousands of hours of work by master engravers, the guns representing exquisite pieces of sporting art. Taxidermy displays here surpass anything you’ll see in America’s top natural history museums. Moreover, bespoke home furnishings and accoutrement that reinforce the outdoor lifestyle of so many patrons will be on display. Auctions for trips, gear, and custom goods are another mainstay of this convention. Finally, guides, outfitters, and professional hunters from some of the most remote regions of our planet will be ready to share what is special about their places, wildlife, and the experiences they offer.

Visit the convention and subsequently travel to the world’s great wildernesses and you will become a part of a growing global network of hunters and advocates who have seen first- hand the magic of wild places and creatures whose fate often hinges on support provided by hunters.

For many, that’s reason enough to be a part of the greatest hunting and conservation show on Earth.









It is refreshing to see something positive about African hunting and SCI. :)

Jim

View attachment 516007
Woohoo! This article....and the fact that it was in Forbes...makes my heart happy! Thanks for sharing @singleshot!
 

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