Need advice

Discussion in 'Bowhunting Africa' started by justwilliams, Jul 19, 2019.

  1. justwilliams

    justwilliams New Member

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    Since I am going to SA next year to spot and stalk hunt with my bow, I would like some input on what animals that are at high risk of being string jumpers.
    Is any of them so skittish that you always should aim very low or even under their chest when hunting them with a bow?

    I am confident about hitting close enough to where I aim, but it would be good to know what animals that have a tendency to jump the string :)

    My main targets will be Kudu, Red Hartebeest, Blesbuck, Bushbuck and Impala.
    But Steenbuck, Grey Duiker, Springbuck and Warthog will also be in risk of getting an arrow their way if I find any decent ones while stalking :D
     

  2. ThomasBeaham

    ThomasBeaham AH Enthusiast

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    There's some video somewhere on this site that will attest to the fact that Impala in particular can duck a string like a magician.
     
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  3. ThomasBeaham

    ThomasBeaham AH Enthusiast

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    Be sure to spend some time looking over the shot placement guides for the critters you intend to target.
    The vital zone on the animals there tend to be located a bit more forward than most North American animals.
     

  4. ThomasBeaham

    ThomasBeaham AH Enthusiast

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  5. Ryan

    Ryan AH Fanatic

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    The smarta$$ answer would be all of them.

    Impala are definitely notorious for it. Like that video shows jumping the arrow is actually ducking first, with the arrow going over the animal. So aim directly at the heart, if it does "jump", your arrow will still probably hit but above the heart and perhaps a bit back. Springbok are pretty twitchy too.

    Good luck.
     
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  6. Hunter101

    Hunter101 AH Veteran

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    going to be a lot of fun spot and stalking. I'm sure that you will catch the bowhunting Africa fever that will have you returning before your first trip is over. Man that's a great trophy list. I have always had a list of trophies going over, but once there you never know what you might have a chance at. So shoot what makes you happy. Impala can and will sometimes jump the string easy, but with a fast setup shouldn't be a problem plus there's a ton of them. Springbok was the toughest animal that I shot in Africa perfect shot guess i only got one lung. He layed down 3 times and i finally got another arrow in him. I have shot 3 Jackal 25,40 and40 yards. The one jumped the string at 40 yards and was a Texas heart shot on video. With a fast setup you should have complete pass through on everything. I think the hardest part for you will be getting through all those sticker bushes. Good luck who you hunting with
     

  7. SURE SIGHT

    SURE SIGHT SPONSOR Since 2019 AH Senior Member

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    Hi There, I agree that Impala may jump the most. However in this video attached you can see a warthog do the same, best is to aim at the heart,

     
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  8. jeff

    jeff AH Legend

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    Steenbok, impala, and warthog seem to me to be the worst , but any animal can string jump, especially on heavily hunted properties!
     

  9. Jaws

    Jaws AH Senior Member

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    Welcome to AH!

    I don't know of anybody that compensate for string jumps. I don't.

    Ive been jumped by Blesbuck when I just started bow hunting & was a bit overly excited myself. Blesbuck are not commonly considered string jumpers, it heard the arrow slide against the mechanical rest (reason why quality rests are important) & was looking directly at me when I let the arrow fly.

    The trick is wary / alert animals are far more prone to string jump. In the videos above, the animals were aware of the hunter & was observing where the arrow was coming from. If the hunter held back till the animals relaxed again, it would have been perfect hits.
    If you can stalk quietly enough & the animal is not aware of you or you time your shots when the animal is not looking at you, you stand the best chance of hitting your aim. The same would apply out of an established hide since most animals will be nervous and alert from previous experiences.
    I would rather invest in a quiet bow set-up than a loud quick arrow set-up.

    W&S to within 30yards of most African prey animals are extremely difficult, consider the fact that these animals are instinctively alert due to being prey to excellent stealth stalking big cats.
    Dense bush provides lots of cover but also lots of noisy dry leaf litter on the ground.
    Sand veld regions I had good results for Warthog which I deem fairly easy to hunt if you get down wind & move preferably with the sun behind you & typically move while they are feeding.
    Early season when the bush is still green or you have late rains does help your stalking a bit, but the trade off is denser bush with limited visibility & obstructions to deflect your arrow.
    I typically try to schedule my hunts during dark moon phases. Kudu especially will feed during the well lit night & sleep during the day.

    Impala & Kudu I find to be the most difficult to hunt W&S with a bow, Impala being herd animals, chances are great that you will be noticed with all the eyes & ears on the look-out, especially when you draw, so practice to draw your bow quietly from just about any positing you can possibly imagine when stalking. (and hold for a while at full draw)
    The only Impala ram I managed to W&S successfully with a bow was during the rut when the rams were oblivious to anything else than competition.

    Kudu, after flushing them from a dense valley for two mornings, I found their tracks coming down a well worn path against a rocky koppie (small mountain) on the third day. With the loose rocks in the area it was impossible to stalk them quietly, I went out early morning on the fourth day and set up an ambush slightly higher up from the path after checking the wind direction. The cows came down the path first & I was worried they would sense me, the bull was wary & trailed the cows by some distance, I couldn't see him but heard him higher up knew he was there, it was the same cows & one very young bull calf I have seen previously. Then I got a glimpse of him, the old bull would move a bit & pause, observe and then move again. It felt like ages & hoped the wind would not give me away. I knew if the cows spotted me, it would be game over. Eventually he stepped into view, oblivious to my presence. He wasn't the biggest Kudu I have taken, but a hard hunted magnificent old bull with well worn Ivory tips. They don't get old & clever by being stupid.
    RHB is challenging due to them typically being in open terrain with little cover. Their vision is excellent.
    Bushbuck I hunted only one with a rife by chance, I was heading up in the shades of a dry riverbed when one ram was chasing an older ram from the side & up the river bed towards me.

    You will need some time to hunt those animals successfully. Practice your stalking skills, pay attention to your clothing & set-up to be as quiet as possible to swing the odds in your favor.
    But if you are a seasoned W&S bow hunter, I'm sure you will be fine.

    Goodluck & have fun!
     
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  10. SURE SIGHT

    SURE SIGHT SPONSOR Since 2019 AH Senior Member

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    Wow Jaws, this is not my thread, but I am following it.
    Thanks for the share. interesting reading thanks
     

  11. Johan De Jager

    Johan De Jager New Member

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    Tips To Make You A Better Bowhunter This Season

    Whether you’re a veteran bowhunter or a newbie heading to the bushveld for the first time, the tips below can help you see more success this season.

    Human odor spooks any wildlife. Shower with a scent-free soap before every hunting trip (i.e. No Scent Hair & Body Wash), and try not to contaminate your hunting clothes on the way to the bushveld or before your trip by washing it in normal washing detergent. Rather use a fragrance-free laundry detergent (i.e. No Scent Laundry Pods). Keep them sealed in a plastic container or zip lock bag until you arrive at your hunting location. Doing so will allow your hunting clothing not to get contaminated by other clothing smells from your everyday use.

    Many hunters spray down with odor eliminator (i.e. No Scent Field Spray) just after suiting up, and prior to the trek into the Blind or on a Walk & Stalk, but experienced hunters will bring an odor eliminator with them. After the walk to the Blind, apply an odor eliminator to your body, paying special attention to your cap.

    Be sure to douse yourself with tick repellant (i.e. Vital Protection). Tick-Bite Fever can shut down your hunting season, and you don’t want it to be over before it’s begun!. Symptoms of African Tick-Bite Fever usually appear within 2 weeks and include fever, headache, rash, muscle pain, and red sore with a dark centre (known as an eschar) that develops at the site of the bite.

    Let’s talk Broadheads:

    Fixed Blade Broadheads –


    When considering the variety of options for your next hunt, consider the different styles of fixed blade broadheads. There are both chisel point broadheads with replaceable blades and cut on contact broadheads. Both serve specific purposes and have benefits for different types of game animals. Fixed broadheads are a fixed head supported by blades the entire length of the ferrule which makes for a structurally stronger broadhead (i.e. SlickTrick, Muzzy, G5, Carbon Express and Rocket to name a few). Fixed blades are regarded as more reliable since you are not forcing the blades to open thus removing any doubt as to whether or not the broadhead will penetrate. While there are different styles of fixed blade broadheads, single piece designs tend to be stronger. Replaceable blade broadheads have a fantastic record of performance in the field and can last longer if the body of the broadhead is not damaged. Single piece broadheads, while stronger, can be rendered useless if a blade or the point is damaged. Regaining an even and sharp edge can be difficult if the blade chips on a rock or from hitting bone. Mechanical broadheads give shooters several design options like rear deploying blades or the classic jackhammer design in which the blades open upon hitting the target.

    Chisel Point –

    Chisel Point broadheads have been a staple in the archery gear diet since the development of modern hunting point and are most often associated with fixed-blade designs. Chisel point broadheads are popular among Blue Wildebeest and Eland Bowhunter’s since they are reusable and can handle hitting tough bones like shoulders and ribs without deflecting. A chisel point cuts through hide by first opening the hide before the blades and helps the arrow maintain the desired course without deflecting.

    Cut-On-Impact -

    Cut-on-impact broadheads begin slicing as soon as they hit the target. Since they slice instead of boring a hole into the hide of an animal first, cut-on-impact broadheads penetrate their target deeper. If you are in a situation where your gear provides less energy for driving deep through the soft tissue of an animal, cut-on-impact broadheads may be your best choice. This style of hunting point is a favorite for hunters choosing recurve and long bows and others shooting low poundage bows. However, if you find yourself hunting the upper levels of the big game spectrum for animals like Blue Wildebeest, Eland, Giraffe, and large predators like Hyena, Leopard, and even Lion, electing to use a cut-on-impact broadhead like the Montec may be one of your best choices. Montecs from G5 have long been a favorite of bow hunters since much of the variability of strength and consistency is taken out due to the one-piece design and can drive deep into the large chest cavities of the toughest game on the South African continent. When hunting game with thick hides and heavy bones, choosing a tough one piece cut-on-impact broadhead can make the difference since it does not slow down upon hitting the target.

    Mechanical Broadhead –

    As technology improves and designs become more sophisticated, mechanical broadheads have become a popular choice of bow hunters since they provide a wider cutting surface than fixed blade broadheads. Because of the opening motion, the broadhead makes upon hitting its target, mechanical broadheads have been the focus of debate for the better part of the past three decades.

    Mechanical broadheads are useful for shooting long distances out of higher poundage bow since they fly like a field point and have been generally regarded as more accurate. The frustration of archers with the fine tuning of larger fixed blade broadheads has pushed many to use mechanicals. Mechanical broadheads also give the shooter the choice between cut-on-impact broadheads and a chisel point. The G5 Havoc and NAP Killzone 100 gives shooters a two-inch cutting diameter and provides deeper penetration because of the cut-on-impact tip. Just remember this as most mechanical broadheads lose energy when hitting the target. Shooting a higher poundage bow and heavy arrow ensures the broadhead will open. It is generally accepted to shoot a bow with a draw weight of at least 60lbs when using mechanical broadheads.

    You’ve taken the shot, now what -

    A shot animal knows that something has happened, but he usually doesn't know what, where or why. He has nothing to fear or flee from unless you provide the noise or the motion to send him on his way. An arrow kills by bleeding the animal. You must give it time to die.

    · Wait at least 1/2 hour on a good hit or longer on poor hits.

    · As much as 5 hours or over night on a bad hit like a gut shot.

    · While you wait, try to recall everything that has happened.

    - Where exactly was your hit?

    - How much penetration was there?

    - Where did you last see it?

    - Did you hear it fall?


    When you begin trailing, if you can't find blood, look for your arrow. Finding your arrow is the only sure way to tell if you got a hit or miss. Many excited hunters find blood while looking for their arrow that was missed. The arrow itself can tell you a lot about the hit. A bright red blood may indicate a heart or artery shot. A pinkish bubbly blood means a lung shot. Green and brown matter or food particles means a gut shot. A greasy tallow on the arrow could mean a brisket shot.

    Getting Help -

    Two or three trackers is an ideal set up. One can stay on the last blood while other search ahead. You might want to carry toilet paper or kleenex to mark your last blood. Don't get so engrossed in the blood trail that you forget to look ahead for a dead animal or one that needs a finishing shot. NEVER walk right on the blood trail, but along side of it. You might need to back track. If your animal has laid down and you jump it, STOP TRACKING. You haven't given the animal enough to bleed out. Try to get your animal when it first lays down. If you don't it will be 10 times harder to track it. On the trial, you have to know what you are looking for.

    Picking up the first blood sign is often the hardest part of the tracking job. A animal can cover a lot of distance before it starts leaving blood on the ground, especially if the animal is running or if you hit it high or left no exit hole. Animal hair can also soak up a lot of blood before it drops to the ground.

    A animal hit high in the lungs will bleed internally until the blood reaches the arrow hole. Don't look for blood only on the ground, also check the low brush and trees etc. Blood dries faster on brush and weeds than it does on the ground and will be darker and harder to detect. Also blood turns black in hot weather. Note how high the blood in on the bush. Is there blood on both sides of the trail or just on one side. Is the animal bleeding down his leg. When the blood trail suddenly ends you are apt to find, within a short distance, your animal lying dead. When the heart stops pumping, he won't travel much farther. He may abandon any trail he has been following and head for heavy brush. Check out dense thickets and blow downs. If still no luck, sweep the surrounding terrain. Sometimes other animals may tell you where your game is. Squirrels, Grey Lourie, Guineafowl and other animals may become excited when something moves in their area. Don't give up the search until there is no hope left. Animals sometimes bleed internally leaving very little sign but it can be picked up by a careful and determined hunter. Tracking under adverse conditions can cause some special problems. Tracking at night is tedious and slow. Bright gas lanterns are better than flashlights. A handheld GPS is a must for night tracking. It is impossible to keep your bearings once the bushveld have turned black. If at all possible, don't track at night. It is a lot better if you can wait until morning.

    What causes good blood trails? -

    Well placed shots.

    Know your limitations and take only shots you know that YOU can make.

    The sharper the broadhead the heavier the blood trail.

    There is no other piece of equipment that is more important than the broadhead. It MUST be as sharp as possible.

    Multi-blade broadheads cut bigger holes than single blade models.

    The best practice a bowhunter can get is by helping someone else track a animal. You will gain valuable experience and someday, when you need a hand, they just might return the favor. The place where you loose the trail is not necessarily the place where it ends. A lost trail always extends beyond the evidence.

    Something to think about...
     

  12. firehuntfish

    firehuntfish AH Fanatic

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    @justwilliams ,

    This short video contains a small compilation of bow shots that will give you a really good idea of the typical reactions you can expect from a variety of plainsgame animals. The common denominator you will see consistently in the video is that animals that are calm and unaware of the hunter have little to no reaction at the shot. Admittedly, most of these shots are taken from inside hides which can actually help conceal the sound of the bow and hunter which is of course a significant advantage. A well-constructed hide with solid walls, sealed doors, dirt floors, and narrow shot windows will go a long way in dampening sound and concealing human odor.

    On my last several safaris, I have pretty much committed to only hunting via spot & stalk, and I can assure you that is a different ball game altogether.... You will need all of the advantages that you can utilize in your favor including good camo, hunting the wind, and having a bow that draws and shoots quietly. With that, I always aim as low as possible on the animal while still being in the vitals. In the event that the animal doesn't drop, your arrow will hopefully still be in the kill zone. I also avoid shots beyond 30 yards where the animal is alerted to my presence. Even with a fast bow north of 300 fps, a shot on an alert animal beyond 30 yards is a low percentage shot in my opinion. On the other hand, if the animal is calm and oblivious to your presence, shots to 40 yards and beyond are quite feasible provided that your bow is quiet.

    To address your original question: The species that are the most likely to jump the string will be the smaller antelopes on your list which would include bushbuck, impala, springbok, steenbok, and duiker. Warthogs are extremely quick, and notorious for string jumping, and, although they were not on your list, monkeys and baboons in particular are probably the quickest animals I have ever observed reacting to a bow shot...Be patient, be persistent, and you will certainly be rewarded! Best of Luck to you!

     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2019

  13. Divernhunter

    Divernhunter AH Elite

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    If they have 4 legs they can jump the string :)
     

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