Namibia MET announces who receives Leopard hunting quota for 2011

AfricaHunting.com

Founder
AH ambassador
Joined
Oct 1, 2007
Messages
11,402
Reaction score
5,942
Website
AfricaHunting.com
Media
5,580
Articles
320
The Namibian Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET) has been contacting the various Namibian outfitters who have applied for and who have received Leopard on quota for the upcoming 2011 hunting season in Namibia. If you are tentatively booked for a Leopard hunt in Namibia for 2011 you can contact your outfitter if you have not heard from them to find out whether or not they have received a Leopard on quota for you.
 

vgruan

AH fanatic
Joined
Feb 11, 2010
Messages
724
Reaction score
240
Location
North West
Media
596
Articles
2
Hunting reports
Africa
4
Member of
SCI, PHASA, DSC, NRA
Hunted
South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique
Jerome,

I think that is a good thing though. It takes out all the guys that is not folowing regulations.
 

AfricaHunting.com

Founder
AH ambassador
Joined
Oct 1, 2007
Messages
11,402
Reaction score
5,942
Website
AfricaHunting.com
Media
5,580
Articles
320
Leopard Hunting Quotas Namibia

Apparently for the 2011 Namibian hunting season a quota of 50 Leopard tags will be issued to State Concessions and Communal Conservancies and a quota of 200 Leopard tags will be issued to Freehold Areas, privately owned territory.

The hunting season in Namibia ends in a couple of weeks and so far about 50 Leopards have been reported taken in 2010, MET is still waiting for some reports back.


Source: The Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET)
 

Roy Sparks

AH veteran
Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
119
Reaction score
49
Media
169
Member of
NAPHA, SCI, South African Hunters and Game Conservation Association
Hi Jerome , can we find out if those were fifty ( 50 ) trophy hunted leopard. If that is the claim by MET , how can we varify that claim ?

There just so many damn lies been told up there no one knows what to believe. Already your comments are in conflict with mine. My Namibian hunting partner was told at the MET permit office one month back that less than 20 leopard had been shot by trophy hunters this season.

Cant see that 30 more have been shot in the time in between !!

Regards - Roy.
 

AfricaHunting.com

Founder
AH ambassador
Joined
Oct 1, 2007
Messages
11,402
Reaction score
5,942
Website
AfricaHunting.com
Media
5,580
Articles
320
Roy,

As you know due to the moratorium placed on Leopard, Leopard hunting started late this year as it only reopened in June.

101 Leopard tags were allocated for the 2010 hunting season, this does include the Leopard tags for State Concessions and Communal Conservancies. The other Leopard tags, out of a total CITES quota, are the rollover for Leopard trophy hunted 2008 and 2009, making the actual number of Leopards to be taken in 2010 at 89.

12 Leopard Tags for State Concessions 2009
12 Leopard Tags for State Concessions 2010
43 Leopard Tags for Communal Conservancies 2010
34 Leopard Tags for Freehold Areas

The 50 Leopards that have been reported taken in 2010 are indeed for trophy Leopards, but since the hunting season is not over, MET is still waiting for some reports back. This information comes to me from a reliable person, a PH who called the MET office for me and spoke directly the the lady in charge of the permits there. I have no reason to believe that the information that MET provided to us is incorrect or untrue in any way.

I personally know several outfitters who got permits for this year and have had clients take trophy hunted Leopards. I don't find it difficult to believe whatsoever that 50 Leopards were taken this year.
 

Roy Sparks

AH veteran
Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
119
Reaction score
49
Media
169
Member of
NAPHA, SCI, South African Hunters and Game Conservation Association
Jerome I would like to believe MET regarding these claims. I suppose the only way to find this out is if they would release the clients contact details and the rest of the paper trail to see if their reporting is accurate.

It just seems very unlikely for the success rate in that country on trophy hunted leopard over bait to suddenly rise from 15 percent to 50 percent in roughly a year.

Also considering that at all who hunted did so according to the law. Remember artificial lights is not yet a legal option. So assuming all played according to the rules any reasonable hunter should question this claim. Hardly credible !!

It is unfortunate that such probing is necessary in our society however if you as an idividual or collectively are an affected party it is necessary to have the truth revealed.

If this is indeed the truth MET should release , or should not have a problem in releasing the contact details of the concerned parties in order to substatiate this claim. Failing this it should be in the capacity of the public to demand the release of these details. MET is a government organisation that represents the citizens of Namibia and I feel they have a right to this information.

Can you assist in this regard ?

Yours sincerely - Roy.
 

Roy Sparks

AH veteran
Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
119
Reaction score
49
Media
169
Member of
NAPHA, SCI, South African Hunters and Game Conservation Association
Readers please understand my concerns in respect of my questions as all is not as transparent as we would be led to believe.

I have before stated that the hides of problem leopard killed by farmers are finding their way to taxidermists and tanneries and for which CITES permits are been issued.That is trading.

The issue of concern here is that I have been told in a meeting at the NAPHA offices that only sport hunted leopard taken by trophy hunters may be exported with CITES permits. There is according to NAPHA no allowance within the CITES quota allocated to Namibia for the trade and exportation of leopard products other than those utilised ( hunted ) by sport hunters ( paying trophy hunters ).

We are of the habit of visiting Nakara tannery with our clients where they can shop. Here we have noted this year that there are still tanned leopard hides for sale at Nakara for +/- US$ 3000.00, more or less the trophy fee for a leopard in Namibia and for which we have been told cites permits can be arranged.I can't believe that NAPHA is not aware of this !!

Irregular ? I think so. How do you feel ?

Roy Sparks.
 

ndumo HUNTING SAFARIS

Sponsor
Since 2016
AH fanatic
Reviews
2
Joined
May 6, 2009
Messages
568
Reaction score
702
Location
Namibia
Website
huntingsafaris.net
Media
1,145
Articles
6
Hunting reports
Africa
1
Member of
NAPHA, SCI, DSC, SAHCA
Hunted
Namibia, Zimbabwe, RSA, USA, Hungary
Here we have noted this year that there are still tanned leopard hides for sale at Nakara for +/- US$ 3000.00, more or less the trophy fee for a leopard in Namibia and for which we have been told cites permits can be arranged.I can't believe that NAPHA is not aware of this !!

Roy, I would like whoever told you that they can "arrange" a CITES tag for a tanned skin from Nakara, to actually produce one. The sales people at Nakara are in all propability just trying to make a sale, there is NO WAYS they will produce a valid 2010 tag for you. (or anyone else.)
 

Red Leg

Lifetime bronze benefactor
AH ambassador
Joined
May 19, 2009
Messages
6,716
Reaction score
19,697
Location
Texas Hill Country
Media
285
Articles
5
Hunting reports
Africa
2
USA/Canada
5
Mex/S.Amer
1
Europe
3
Member of
SCI DSC life memberships / NRA Patron Life
Hunted
Mexico, Namibia, RSA, Germany, Austria, Argentina, Canada, Mozambique, Spain, US (15 states)
Roy, you continue to cite this 15 percent figure for success rates over bait. I would urge those on the board who are interested in a leopard to contact a reputable consultant and not to hesitate to hunt a baited cat in Namibia. Both of my friends had 100 percent success (total of 6 hunts/ 6 cats) on the limited available permits this year. They, at least, will be just as successful next year, and I have no doubt several others have similar success rates. I would also add, like on most issues, that there is another side to the perception of how effectively Namibian and NAPHA efforts are in mannaging their game. A frequent villain when heard from the Namibian perspective is the South African hunter ecncroaching into Namibia. I have no doubt those complaints were also over stated. I'll simply leave with the suggestion that you do your homework, and wherever you book that hunt for a cat, ensure it is with an outfitter with high success rates and proven track record.
 

enysse

AH ambassador
Joined
Jan 20, 2009
Messages
11,780
Reaction score
4,365
Media
136
Hunting reports
Africa
8
USA/Canada
1
Member of
Northeast Wisconsin SCI chapter, Lifetime member of NRA,RMEF
Hunted
Namibia, South Africa (East Cape, Guateng and Limpopo)
Thanks Red Leg, for your 2 cents, I think it's highly likely that leopards could be taken in some areas of Namibia....under the current regulation. I think the old regulations worked better in parts of Namibia...where the leopards where more nocturnal....due to people, farming, etc. and using dogs to run them out of there hiding spots during the day....was certainly more successful. And there was certainly jealousy involved in crafting the new regulations. I just wonder if the new regulations were good for the leopard ? I only question the new regulations, based on the fact...that when operators were very successful, people were more tolerant of the leopard....he was worth money....under the new system are people just shooting leopards....because too many livestock, etc. are possibly being eaten...and what are they doing with the leopard...burying it or selling it for the tanned skin. I just wonder? Because under the new regulations...it will be harder...than the old way to fill a tag. Having never tagged a leopard....I would like to one day.
 

Red Leg

Lifetime bronze benefactor
AH ambassador
Joined
May 19, 2009
Messages
6,716
Reaction score
19,697
Location
Texas Hill Country
Media
285
Articles
5
Hunting reports
Africa
2
USA/Canada
5
Mex/S.Amer
1
Europe
3
Member of
SCI DSC life memberships / NRA Patron Life
Hunted
Mexico, Namibia, RSA, Germany, Austria, Argentina, Canada, Mozambique, Spain, US (15 states)
Don't misunderstand my reply to Roy. As I have written in other posts, bait under lights or dogs are the only effective way to hunt leopards in much of the ranch country in Namibia. Taking those options off the table simply means that ranchers will revert back to traps and poison - neither of which produces a CITES managed cat. My only point to Roy is that some outfitters are having high rates of success under the present conditions in Namibia. They will be even more successful still should lights again be allowed, and as you indicate, the leopard can only benefit from such a decision.
 

Roy Sparks

AH veteran
Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
119
Reaction score
49
Media
169
Member of
NAPHA, SCI, South African Hunters and Game Conservation Association
Hi Red Leg. The main object of my posts is to seek truth. To many lies have been told and lots of accusations without substantiated proof as mentioned , I believe in the opening thread here by Jerome.

If the historical figure hovers around 15 % that would sound accurate to me. However lets stick to facts , I make this remark based only on what was told to me in a meeting by a senior MET official. If this is incorrect where does the problem lie ? If MET's word cannot be taken as factual who are we to believe ?

I have had posts here removed because what I've said may jeopordise the views of hunters who may intend to hunt in Namibia.

I can say this about leopard hunting over bait , if one method lends itself to pulling the wool over the eyes of a client it is in this method.

It has been claimed in Napha meetings about houndsmen poaching leopard on other landowners properties where they have no hunting rights. This was used as an argument against the use of hounds in the desicion making to have it banned. The claim was in view of the extensive properties and absentee landlords.

For all who know hunting hounds , who would intentionally use them to go and poach with ?

Facts to consider : Theres a team of hounds trailing a leopard all giving tongue - highly visible and highly vocal and on the move with men in attendence also on the move.

Would you reasonably claim that this is an effective or clandestine way of poaching ?

What I do know is that it is a lot easier to sneak in onto a remote corner of someone elses farm and set up a bait quitely in a deep ravine and quite easily shoot a leopard like that without being detected.

Among other unsubstantiated claims by Napha were of captured leopard being shot and wounded prior to release. Or having their pads burnt so they could not venture to far away and then chased down by dogs. Truelly sickening but unsubstantiated with proof. I feel it is my right to make this known in the name of fairness. If it offends people let them consider that the livelihoods of a bunch of people have been jeopordised unfairly by claims made by Napha.

Lots more can be said against bait hunts and in which respect there is plenty of substantiated proof from the past.

Roy Sparks.
 

Roy Sparks

AH veteran
Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
119
Reaction score
49
Media
169
Member of
NAPHA, SCI, South African Hunters and Game Conservation Association
Hello Karl ,

What concerns me is I've learned that after 15 years of hunting in Namibia that a lot depends on your connections in places where it matters.

Here on Africahunting a Namibian taxidermist was advertising pictures of value added artifacts containing or made up of leopard hides for sale to the overseas market.

What is not possible if you're have the right connections ?

A Namibian outfitter and Napha member was exposed for illegally conducting a successful bow hunt for leopard over hounds. It was swept aside by the ombudsman at the time.

The same outfitter had a warrant out for his arrest for the theft of my hounds , a fact well known by Napha and in which respect they did zero.

As a token of appreciation though they allowed the same person to be ellected on commitees , and also that of the Namibian Houndsmens association affiliated ( sub comittee of Napha ).

Who do we believe Karl ?
 

Gavin Lipjes

AH veteran
Joined
Feb 16, 2010
Messages
123
Reaction score
39
Media
13
Articles
3
Member of
Club bleu de Gascon, Gascon Saintongeois, Ariegeois
Hunted
South Africa, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Germany, France, Belgium, Austria, Spain, Australia and USA
As I have written in other posts, bait under lights or dogs are the only effective way to hunt leopards in much of the ranch country in Namibia. Taking those options off the table simply means that ranchers will revert back to traps and poison - neither of which produces a CITES managed cat. My only point to Roy is that some outfitters are having high rates of success under the present conditions in Namibia. They will be even more successful still should lights again be allowed, and as you indicate, the leopard can only benefit from such a decision.

Red leg your post is very relevant in this current global conservation awareness. What science has learned is that of highest priority is to conserve biodiversity. In the agricultural dominated areas this translates into finding systems which provide food security but with the least cost to the the environment. In many cases select trophy hunting can provide a tolerance for animals like the Leopard by placing a value on the animal. Simple system which we are all familiar with in the tribal and concession areas.
With this knowledge would it not be better to adopt modern concepts and practises that may afford some benefit?

Without a doubt over-harvesting of a quota is detrimental but I do not believe the houndsmen were issuing the permits.
For 16 or 17 years now Zimbabwe has permitted the use of hounds and the pioneers of this method in the trophy hunting arena have recorded data which shows without doubt the sustainability of this practise.

Leopard cannot be fenced in and due to their territorial nature will occupy any section of land that can supply their needs.
It is my opinion that any system implemented which assists farmers in tolerating Leopards will have rapid and vast benefits for the total population.
 

kdtaxi

New member
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Website
www.allhunts.com
Member of
SCI, RMEF, DU,
Hunted
South Africa (Limpopo, East Cape, Kimberly, Karoo); Namibia (Etosha Area)
Jerome,
As you will recall from our phone conversation, I have 2 clients that were planning on leopard hunting in 2011, but it appears the outfitter missed a deadline for applying for the permits. Can you please explain the process further so others can understand the quota/permit process. Is it correct that there would be no leopard permits available now for 2011, unless previously awarded? This system seems to be very confusing, and according to my outfitter, he did not recieve notices from NAPHA or MET advising deadlines. Does anyone know if there is still a way to get a permit for leopard for 2011, even with another outfitter?

Thanks to all that reply.
 

AfricaHunting.com

Founder
AH ambassador
Joined
Oct 1, 2007
Messages
11,402
Reaction score
5,942
Website
AfricaHunting.com
Media
5,580
Articles
320
kdtaxi, there are outfitters in Namibia at this time with Leopard on quota who have not yet sold their Leopard for 2011... As far as the outfitter not receiving a notice from NAPHA or MET, I must say that it is not only his responsibility to find out what the new regulation requires but as a hunting outfitter promoting Leopard hunting in Namibia one would think that they would be on top of things to secure every chance to get a Leopard or more on quota.

The following should help you understand the procedure...

Attached please find the Amendment of Regulations relating to Nature Conservation: Nature Conservation Ordinance, 1975 sent by NAPHA.



MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM
Windhoek, 14 January 2010

SCHEDULE

Definitions

1. In these regulations, “the Regulations” means the Regulations Relating to Nature Conservation, published under Government Notice No. 240 of 1976, as amended by Government Notices Nos. 256 of 1976; 112, 248, 302, 314 and 364 of 1977; 114, 190 and 247 of 1978; 10, 50 and 56 of 1979; AG.8 of 1981; AG.41 of 1982; 23, 49 and 61 of 1983; 72 of 1984; 3, 36, 101 and 121 of 1985; 122 and 242 of 1986; 81 of 1987; 89 of 1988; AG.37 and AG.44 of 1989; 152 of 1993; 304 of 1996, 83 of 1997 and 59 of 2009.


Insertion of certain definitions in Regulations

2. The following definitions are inserted in the Regulations after the definition of “Naukluft Mountain Zebra Park”:

“’predator’, in relation to regulations 114A, 114B and 114C, means a cheetah, leopard or lion;

“trophy hunting guide” means a hunting guide, master hunting guide or professional hunter;”.


Insertion of regulations 114A, 114B and 114C in Regulations

3. The following regulations are inserted after regulation 114 of the Regulations:


“Leopard trophy hunting quota

114A. (1) Only a trophy hunting operator registered with NTB and the Ministry may apply for leopard trophy hunting quota.

(2) A person who wants a leopard trophy hunting quota must apply by fully completing the application form in Schedule E.

(3) An applicant may only be allocated a maximum of two leopard trophy hunting quotas per trophy hunting season in a form of leopard trophy hunting quota tag, which tag -

(a) is issued by the Permit Office;

(b) reflects the trophy hunting quota Number; and

(c) is valid for a specific trophy hunting season.

(4) The Ministry allocates leopard trophy hunting quotas based on the size of land (2500ha is the cut off limit) and any relevant scientific information available such as estimated population size, trophy size and trends, hunting success rate, density and habitat, and communal conservancies and hunting concessions on State land are not included.

(5) Applications for leopard trophy hunting quotas for the following trophy hunting season end on 30 September in each year.

(6) Leopard trophy hunting tags are allocated and handed over to successful applicants from 31 October until 30 January.

(7) The cost for a leopard trophy hunting tag is as set out in Schedule D paragraph (d).”.


Application for predator trophy hunting permit

114B. (1) A person who wants a predator trophy hunting permit must apply by fully completing the application form in Schedule F.

(2) Only fully completed application form for a predator trophy hunting permit is processed, and it is the duty of the applicant to ensure that his or her application form is completed in full.

(3) An application for a predator trophy hunting permit must be submitted to the Permit Office of the Ministry 14 days before the hunt commences.

(4) When applying for a predator trophy hunting permit for a leopard, an applicant must have a leopard trophy hunting quota tag available.

(5) A copy of the passport or identity document of a trophy hunter must be attached to the application for a predator trophy hunting permit.


Conditions of predator trophy hunting permit

114C. (1) A trophy hunter, trophy hunting guide and trophy hunting operator must read and acknowledge and sign the predator trophy hunting permit conditions before the hunt commences.

(2) A predator trophy hunting permit must be obtained before the hunt for a predator commences and must be in the physical possession of the trophy hunting guide while the predator is being hunted.

(3) The trophy hunting operator concerned must give notice of the predator hunt to the regional office of the Ministry seven days before the hunt commences.

(4) A predator trophy hunting permit is -

(a) issued to a trophy hunter;

(b) non-transferable; and

(c) valid for a period specified in the permit.


(5) Predators may only be hunted for trophies under the following conditions -

(a) only free roaming, self-sustaining and adult predators may be hunted as trophies with a minimum skull measurement of 27cm for a cheetah, 32cm for a leopard and 52cm for a lion;

(b) a female leopard may not be hunted as trophy;

(c) a predator may not be shot in any form of confinement or in a trap or in an area which is smaller than 1000ha;

(d) a predator may be baited, but a live animal may not be used as bait;

(e) a predator may not be shot within a range of 1km of any other predator kept in captivity in any form;

(f) a predator may be stalked, tracked or ambushed, but dogs or horses may not be used for that purpose or for hunting;

(g) predator trophy hunting may not take place during the period between 30 minutes after sunset in any day and 30 minutes before sunrise the following day and artificial light is prohibited;

(h) a predator may not be shot from a moving vehicle or chased in any way with an aircraft;

(i) a predator may not be hunted unless it belongs to a wild and sustainable population (It exists as a naturally interacting member of a wild and sustainable population in an area large enough for it to breed, forage and hunt freely and where there is a natural state of balance between forage, predator and prey);

(j) a predator bred in captivity may not be trophy hunted;

(k) a predator to be hunted may not be drugged in any form;

(l) a canned hunting (any restriction of an animal’s natural movement for the purpose of trophy hunting) in any form is illegal;

(m) a predator may only be hunted in areas as specified on the predator trophy hunting permit;

(n) once the predator has been killed, the following must occur -

(i) the following photos must be taken immediately after the hunt, at the location where the predator was killed -

(aa) the predator lying on its right showing the feet;

(bb) the predator lying on its left showing the feet;

(cc) a close-up photo from the front showing the face of the predator, clearly depicting facial features: nose, eyes, and mouth, and a visible leopard hunting quota tag number, in case of a leopard; and

(dd) a photo of the trophy hunter and trophy hunting guide posing with the predator, with all four legs of the predator stretched out for clear visibility; and

(ii) the trophy hunter and trophy hunting guide must sign all the photos on the reverse side;

(o) the recording sheet of the predator trophy hunting permit in Schedule G has to be filled in, in permanent ink, immediately after the hunt;

(p) the trophy hunter and trophy hunting guide must sign on the reverse side of the predator trophy hunting permit with the following statement:

“We hereby individually and collectively declare that the predator recorded and photographed was hunted, shot and killed by us in full accordance with all the predator trophy hunting permit conditions.”;

(q) a telephonic report must be given to the staff member responsible for the predator trophy hunting permit register in the Permit Office in Windhoek within 72 hours of the predator being killed, and full details of the predator trophy hunting permit must be provided;

(r) an unsuccessful predator hunt has to be reported to the Permit Office in Windhoek within 72 hours after the trophy hunting permit has expired;

(s) no application for subsequent predator trophy hunting permit from a trophy hunting operator may be processed if the Permit Office has not received the report on the previous permit issued to his or her client (trophy hunter);

(t) the original predator trophy hunting permit with full details as described in paragraph (u) must be handed in to the Taxidermist or shipping agent with the trophy;

(u) an application for a permit to export a predator trophy must be handed in at the Permit Office in Windhoek and must be accompanied by -

(i) a copy of the passport of the trophy hunter and of a page thereof with an immigration stamp indicating the date of entry;

(ii) the original predator trophy hunting permit;

(iii) the trophy hunting quota tag, in case of a leopard;

(iv) the recording sheet; and

(v) the photos referred to in paragraph (n); and

(v) export permit may not be issued if the conditions in paragraph (u) have not been met.


Any contravention or non compliance with any regulation or permit condition is dealt with accordance with the Nature Conservation Ordinance, 1975 (Ordinance No. 4 of 1975), especially sections 84(5), 86, 87, 88 and 89.


Amendment of Schedule D to Regulations

4. Schedule D to the Regulations is amended by the substitution for paragraph (d) of the following paragraph:
“(d) Issue of permits and quota tags:

Type of permit & Fees

Night Cropping Permit N$100

Import Permit N$100

Export Permit N$100

Export Permit for carcass or raw meat of game or wild animal:
• Cloven-footed animal as big or smaller than springbok (per whole
carcass or portion or raw meat) N$12
• Cloven-footed animal bigger than a springbok (per whole carcass or portion or raw meat) N$25

Biltong Hunting Permit N$100

Trophy Hunting Permit N$100

Any other Permit N$50

Leopard Hunting Quota Tag N$5 000


See document for trophy hunting quota, hunting permit & record sheet forms.
 

Attachments

  • #Amended M E T Regulations.pdf
    318.9 KB · Views: 81

Forum statistics

Threads
37,674
Messages
720,352
Members
67,404
Latest member
Lisette667
 

 

 

Latest profile posts

Cervus elaphus wrote on Bob Nelson 35Whelen's profile.
Hi Bob, how's things going in Wyong?. Down your way a couple of years back but haven't been in NSW since Ebor for the fishing. just getting over some nasty storms up here in Qld, seeing the sun for the first time in a few days. I'm going to NZ in the spring and hope to clean up a few buns while there and perhaps shake the spiders out of my old .303LE (currently owned by my BIL). Cheers Brian
A couple pictures of the sable i chased for miles in Mozambique, Coutada 9!! We finally caught up to him and I had the trophy of a lifetime. Mokore Safaris, Doug Duckworth PH
sable Coutada 9.JPG
sable 2 - Coutada 9.JPG
Safari Dave wrote on egrmpty507's profile.
Did you purchase your hunt at a US SCI fundraiser?
uplander01 wrote on colorado's profile.
Heard you may have load data for the 500 Jeffery,.....any info would be appreciated. Was thinking 535gr, but already had a response that the 570gr would be a better way to go, not sure why.
Rickmt wrote on Leica Sport Optics's profile.
will Leica Amplus 6-2.5x15x50 fit on a pro success Blaser with low mount?
 
Top