NAMIBIA: Khomas Highlands Hunting Safaris May 2018

Discussion in 'Hunting Reports Africa' started by hoguer, Jun 12, 2018.

  1. hoguer

    hoguer AH Member

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    Long post warning! Cliff notes for those who just like the guts- Khomas Highlands Hunting Safaris in Namibia is a AMAZING place for someone looking for true spot and stalk free range hunting, great food, drinks and lodging, and most importantly a staff that truly cares about their guests, the quality of the experience and quality animal management and conservation. Our travel dates were 5/24/18-6/04/18 with beautiful weather in the mid 70s during the day and clear skies. If you are in the market for a awesome trip, Philip and the crews down there deserve your consideration.
    www.khomas-highland-hunting.com


    Preface
    Hello to all who are taking the time to read this review. My name is Thomas, I am a 29 year old California native that was looking at planning a solo trip to SA for a paling game trophy hunt and I found AfricaHunting.com while searching reviews on a outfitter in SA that I had recommended. Google popped up with AH and opened my eyes to all of the options that were available for my dream trip.
    I hunt all over the US for birds and big game, and have never been on a guided hunt in my life (until this trip) so as you can imagine, traveling to a foreign country on a different continent with thousands of dollars on the line I wanted to make sure to take the time to do some research on the geographical area that would provide me with the trophy quality I dreamed of; an outfitter that understood I wanted to hunt fair chase, free range animals; and I don't mind working hard for my trophies.

    The Search
    Along the way I posted a few questions here on AH and got a awesome response from all of the members here with tons of helpful advice and guidance. It became very clear to me early on that although SA offers some great trophies, it did not necessarily offer a lot of options for free range hunting and I may be better suited looking at the surrounding countries for the hunt I desired. During the initial research portion of my trip, my father and hunting partner here in the states came out of the woodwork and told me he wished to join me for my adventure as a early retirement present as he will be out of the work force hopefully in the next year or two, and after some long talks he convinced me this trip is what he wanted to do so I was now looking for a trip for two!
    I was approached by many sponsors of the site after posting a "dream hunt" description here on AH and after they answered some preliminary questions I narrowed it down to a few outfitters, and after a few talks with Philip at Khomas Highland Hunting Safaris the decision was made to book a 10 day hunt for two with 13 animals on the list and all inclusive amenities at a very competitive price.
    My list:
    1-Kudu
    1-Gemsbok
    1-Blue Wildebeest
    1-Black Wildebeest
    1-Heartmans Zebra
    1-Red Heartbeest
    1- Warthog

    My fathers:
    1-Kudu
    1-Gemsbok
    1-Blue Wildebeest
    1-Heartmasn Zebra
    1-Red Heartbeest
    1-Warthog

    The Flight
    One thing I noticed in this market is there is a concierge service offered for just about every aspect of the trip. We were on a tight budget but at the suggestion of AH members we chose to use a Travel Agent to ensure a smooth trip due to the fact that we would be traveling with 3 firearms. We booked with Jennifer at Travel Express, another sponsor here at AH as they specialize in safaris and travel with firearms. We had about 9 months from the time of commitment to Khomas Highlands to our Safari so we also made a point to get our Global Entry clearance done to speed up our domestic terminal security clearance and signed up for Global Rescue for the time we would be in Namibia as a little extra insurance. We also made a trip to our local US Customs office for 4457 forms on our firearms to prove ownership (not required but ended up making everything run more smoothly at the airports)
    We departed from San Francisco and the check in of the firearms took us an additional 30 minutes over the "normal" time to expect. You have to love all of the dirty looks you get from passerbys in the Bay Area when you have 3 pelican cases and camo backpacks :)
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    Our rifles were checked through to our final destination so that helped us. We flew SFO - JFK with Delta Airlines, had a 4 hour layover and departed JFK - OR Tambo, South Africa with South African Airlines and a flight time of 14hr 50min. I will say, we spent a extra $75/per person on this leg of the journey for exit row seats, and it was worth every penny! I'm a little taller than most at 6'02" and the extra legroom was priceless.
    After arriving at OR Tambo we were sadly stuck with a 5 hour layover that seemed to go on forever, but we finally boarded the South African Airways flight to Windhoek and an arrival time of 3:10pm and after clearing our rifles through Namibian Police we walked outside to find Philip awaiting us with a big smile on his face and a handshake. We loaded up into the Land Cruiser and started the trip to the Farm Heusis property where we would be based for the next 10 days. We arrived, unloaded into our very spacious house and had a great dinner of grilled Gemsbok backstop with homemade dinner rolls, salad, dessert and plenty of cold beer. The night was called early as we were both exhausted from 44 hours of airports and airplanes so we went to bed in preparation for the next morning.
    The drive from the airport, Sunny and 75!
    [​IMG]

    The Hunt
    As you read above, we based our hunt out of the Farm Heusis property as we had a Plains Game bucket list to fill. It was subject to slight change as you can see in the top photo! Ill save you the pictures of our rooms, as there are plenty of photos on the website but to summarize it they were a very clean blend of traditional decor with nice modern bathrooms, a full kitchen with a fridge stocked with beverages and comfortable beds.
    We started the morning at 0630 for a hot and fresh breakfast of coffee, fried eggs, bacon and homemade white bread toast with jam. Our PH Adab and driver Erik met us with the land cruiser at 0700 and we were off to check zero on the rifles. We set up a target at 150 yards and shot off of the shooting sticks we brought and grew to be fond of, a set of Jim Shockey edition Trigger Sticks. All of the rifles had held their zeros over that long journey and we were excited to see what the morning brought us.
    We had made a point to tell Philip that we didn't want to shoot our trophies from the back of the truck and and our crew were more than up to the task for the 10 days ahead of us, as we covered many miles on foot, exactly what we had hoped for. Philips family cattle ranch itself is approximately 8500 ha of low fence land that has several man made lakes on the property for the cattle and game, and can range from rolling hills and valleys with Leopard, Springbok, Steenbok, Blue Wildebeest, Black Wildebeest, Red Hartebeest, Kudu, Gemsbok and Warthogs up to the mountains where we found more Gemsbok, Kudu and the hearty Mountain Zebra. The property is part of the Khomas Hochland Conservancy, a giant land area of over 150,000ha and sitting at about 5,500 ft in elevation at the Farm Heusis that has all come together in an effort to help in the conservation and management of the native game animals.
    The morning started with a several mile walk that put us on a heard of approximately 20 Gemsbok that were all healthy females or immature bulls, a few red heartbeest bulls that were moving away from us, a Ostrich and finally a heard of Blue Wildebeest that decided to stay around for a bit to long, and I was able to fill my first tag!
    I shot a ancient Blue Wildebeest bull at 225 yards off of sticks with my trusty 300 WinMag and he was down within 20 yards of impact with a bullet that the trackers later showed me had pierced his heart as well as lungs.
    (me left, father right)
    [​IMG]

    With this old guy down, we headed back to the houses to have him processed as well as eat a delicious lunch of Gemsbok cheeseburgers and had a siesta until 1530 when we met for coffee and cake.
    The evening hunt had us glassing more Gemsbok, and well as seeing a healthy heard of Springbok and bumping a few Steenbok while we were stalking. The group of Oryx was well over 800 yards away when we first glassed them, so we carefully made our way on the final stalk of the day and got into position to gauge quality and sex of the animals. Suddenly I noticed a large warthog coming out of the brush below us and Adab took one look at him and whispered excitedly "Shoot! Good Warthog. Shoot!" So my dad setup on the shooting sticks and dropped him in his tracks at 120 yards.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    That ended the first day on the hunt with what we felt was a very successful day, and we headed back to the houses for a amazing dinner, more beers than we probably should have and another night of deep sleep dreaming of what day 2 would bring us.

    **More to come**
     

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  2. gillie

    gillie AH Member

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    Hunted the KH for the second time last year... can't wait for the rest of the report... magical place !
     
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  3. cpr0312

    cpr0312 AH ENABLER AH Ambassador

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    Good start!! Look forward to more, congrats on the first few trophies!
     

  4. johnnyblues

    johnnyblues AH ENABLER AH Ambassador

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    I love Namibia, look forward to the rest!
     

  5. hoguer

    hoguer AH Member

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    I am hoping to go back through the original post and clean up some auto correct spelling mistakes and add a little info but I cant find the edit button. Any assistance?
     

  6. Mekaniks

    Mekaniks GOLD SUPPORTER AH Elite

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    I think there is a timeline to edit. Like 20min from original post or something like that.
    Your original post is perfect. Don’t let small edits get in the way of continuing you story(y). We are all waiting!:)
     
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  7. hoguer

    hoguer AH Member

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    Dang I wish I would have known that! The next post will have to be from the computer so I can have a little more time to review it. More to come this evening!
     
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  8. 375 Ruger Fan

    375 Ruger Fan GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

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    After that long, long plane trip with no layover, you guys deserved a great hunt. Sounds like you had one too. Look forward to the rest of the report.
     
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  9. BRICKBURN

    BRICKBURN AH ENABLER SUPER MODERATOR CONTRIBUTOR LIFETIME TITANIUM BENEFACTOR AH Ambassador

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    PM sent
     

  10. Nyati

    Nyati AH ENABLER AH Ambassador

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    So far, great !
     
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  11. Jfet

    Jfet AH Fanatic

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    Mispellings... didn't see any

    Bad Grammer... didnt se any

    Enjoyed the story.(y)(y)(y)
     
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  12. hoguer

    hoguer AH Member

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    A few things I forgot to mention that I cant add to the original post:

    We were in the company of a fellow American hunter by the name of Yancy that had several days under his belt when we arrived. Yancy is a fellow AH member and was a pleasure to spend the evenings with during our stay and a fun guy to talk to.

    Rifles: I took my custom Jense Precision (now PROOF Research) 300 WinMag. The rifle was build by KK Jense the President of PROOF Research with components from most of the companies he merged to create PROOF. It is sporting a 28” Carbon Fiber 1-11.25twist barrel, a Defiance right bolt left port action, a Lone Wolf carbon fiber stock, Bix’n’Andy TacSport trigger and a Bushnell LRHSi 4.5-18x44. I was shooting handloads of Hornady ELD-X 178gr with ADG Brass at 3100fps and well under half minute groups off the bench.

    In celebration of my fathers pending retirement, my sister and I got together and surprised him with a new custom built rifle as a present. I had convinced him that his Jense Precision 308 that he has had for years would be enough bang for Africa, all while assembling parts for his new 300 WinMag. The rifle was built by Spartan Precision Rifles out of San Jose, Ca and features a house branded Defiance Deviant Ultralight Hunter action, a PROOF Research 24” Lite Sendero contour 1-10twist carbon fiber wrapped barrel with 5/8-24 threads and a thread protector, a Manners Composite Stocks EH-6A carbon fiber stock, Timney 510 Trigger, Spartan Precision Javelin Carbon Fiber bipod and was initially spec’d with a Leica ER5 and American Precision Arms 30mm rings. The rifle was shooting handloads of Hornady ELD-X 200gr with ADG Brass at 2910fps and awesome accuracy.
    His rifle:
    The muzzle brake was removed for the hunt and we swapped out the harris for the Spartan bipod.

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    The scope ended up being a disaster that we were able to diagnose prior to our trip thank god. When I initially put it on the rifle for load development, after sighting it in the elevation turret cap contacted the turret when I put it back on and when tightened down it would adjust the scope about 5-6 clicks that you could feel as it tightened. I had ordered the scope from EuroOptic and with a quick call, they had a replacement on the way to me with the original on the way back to them for a warranty replacement. The second scope came in the day before my father was to receive the rifle, so I just had time to mount it without shooting it before he received it, which was no big deal as he would need to adjust eye relief, etc to set up the rifle for himself. After he got the rifle (he was VERY surprised to say the least) we took it out to the range, and when I went to take off the elevation turret cap, the entire turret unscrewed from the scope body! Thankfully I had a trusty Vortex/Cabelas Intrepid 4.5-22x50 sitting on the shelf at home and we had something tried and true to mount up and sight in for our hunt! EuroOptic has offered us a full refund on the scope and been great about the entire ordeal but Leica has let me down immensely.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 13, 2018

  13. hoguer

    hoguer AH Member

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    BACK TO THE STORY!

    Hunting Day 2:

    We awoke and got ready for our breakfast at 0630. Fresh coffee, eggs, bacon and toast that would become the staple for every morning on our hunt and the perfect way to start the day. On the trucks at 0700 and out looking for Zebra and Kudu as our main goal for the morning. We headed to the hills, passing herds of Springbok and a few Steenbok when we glassed a herd of 20+ zebra on a hilltop over a mile away. We made our way up to the herd, and about half way there we had a group of about 10 zebra bust out of the brush next to the truck. Two large stallions stopped broadside at 80 yards, and from our position on the bench seat in the back of the truck I had the perfect shot, IF they hadn’t been stopped immediately in line with one another! I decided to hold off because if I didn’t hit bone, the bullet would have easily passed through and hit the second animal and I didn’t want to spend the day chasing a second wounded zebra over the mountains. We later learned what a rarity it was to have a stallion stop and offer himself up like that as the zebra turned out to be one of the hardest animals of the trip to hunt.

    We continued on foot from there in an attempt to catch the initial herd we had spotted for a realistic shot, but they had moved slowly but steadily away from us during the stalk and we never had a shot under 400 yards with a still target. We followed them down and up a second mountain, all the while they increased their lead on us and it became a hopeless goal to catch up with them, so we changed our focus and began glassing the mountains around us. Adab SOMEHOW spotted the horns of a Gemsbok sticking out above a bush over 600 yards away, and my father and I were able to find the target and the decision was made to head their direction. Down one draw and back up to the next ridge top where we could getter a better vantage point to find out the single set of horns attached to a healthy female Gemsbok, and a heard of over 30 of her closest friends all bedded on the hillside below her. We crawled to a rocky outcropping where we could position for a potential shot at right under 200 yards, and continue to observe the bedded animals in hopes of spotting a healthy bull or two in the group. After waiting a solid half hour, Adab had his eyes on what he suspected was a quality bull that was bedded behind a bush with only his head and horns visible through the branches. It was now a waiting game to see when he got up.

    Our patience won, and a mature bull with a neat set of neat uneven length horns stood up and presented a beautiful broadside shot to me. I took a second to let the adrenalin die down as they had no clue we were watching them, and took the shot with a solid THUD of the impact immediately heard and the entire group of Gemsbok jumping up in confusion as they didn’t know where the shot had come from. We had 3 young oryx run straight towards us, and passed us withing 20 feet still with no clue we were there, and the main herd only moved about 100yds and my Gemsbok stopped in a near death confusion about half way from where he was shot to where the herd ended up, so I hit him again and he fell where he stood. The second shot for some reason didn’t cause much scare to the main group so my dad and I swapped places on the rock and Adab pointed out a big, old female that he suggested my father take. A quick range verification with the Nikon Black 4k LRF and the gemsbok was sitting at 285 yards, the dope was dialed on the scope and boom, second oryx down! We walked down to our new trophies, and Adab radioed to Erik and disappeared into the bush to help guide the truck into our honey hole. A few pics were taken, and back to camp for lunch and siesta time!

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    Awoke at 1530 for coffee and cake and back on the road at 1600. The evening of day 2 was focused on Black Wildebeest and we headed the opposite direction from the house that we had in the morning. More Springbok, a large group of baboons and a few small warthogs crossed our path and on the way out and always gave us encouragement that we were hunting a game rich area.

    We ended up spotting a group of approximately 15 Black Wildebeest and started a stalk, with my dad somehow completely missing a broadside shot at 100 yards (I know, we have to work on his “buck fever”) and we chased the animals in the group for a few miles as they moved away and the sun kept moving lower and lower, never presenting another chance for a shot. As we came into the last clearing that we caught the sight of them disappearing into the far brush thickets, Adab immediately said “Big Kudu!” and pointed down the clearing. We all pulled up our binoculars to see a healthy bull making his way slowly from our 9 oclock towards 12oclock. I set up on the shooting sticks and my dad ranged him at 320, 300, 290, 285 and he stopped, with no clue we were in the area. I took a breath to calm down and squeezed the trigger, but the moment I did I knew I hit forward on my shot. The kudu bucked up and started running away towards 11oclock and I put two more rounds in him as he ran, the last shot being around 400 yards but both hits resulting in much more solid report on impact. The second round definitely caused him to slow down, but he disappeared into the same brush the Blue Wildebeest had vanished into. We made chase and at the point where he disappeared, we had a great blood trail and found him within 100 yards of the first spot we picked up the trail. He was down, and inspection revealed my first shot just nicked him in the brisket, but the two running shots had gone through the back quarters and right into the boiler room. Not the clean kill that we always hope for, but reality. I was relieved he didn’t go far with the fatal shots, and I had a nice mature bull that measured 50/51 respectively with beautiful ivory tips and a very dark, near black face and I had harvested my ultimate trophy for the trip on our second night!

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    Dark was fast approaching and we were several miles from the truck at this point so Adab radioed to the other hunting party that was working with Yancy and they made their way to pick us up and take us back to our Land Cruiser and then back to camp for a celebratory dinner and more than our fair share of Gin and Tonics, a staple of the hosts and something we grew quite fond of during our stay.

    Another night of restful evening and more excitement about what a great decision we had made joining Philip and his crews out at Khomas Highlands and what tomorrow might bring.


    **More to come!**
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 13, 2018

  14. BenKK

    BenKK AH Fanatic

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    Nice warthogs!

    I’ve heard that Leica customer service is poor.
     
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  15. cls

    cls AH Fanatic

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    Congrats on a successful hunt, waiting for the rest of the story
     
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  16. cpr0312

    cpr0312 AH ENABLER AH Ambassador

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    Wow nice kudu and gemsbok!
     
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  17. hoguer

    hoguer AH Member

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    Day 3

    Awoke and arrived at the standard time of 0630 for breakfast. On the truck by 0700 and the camp was joined by a British couple that had spent several days on a safari across Namibia with one of the employees of the ranch, a fellow named Roy. They were after Blue Wildebeest and possibly a Oryx, and we were headed back to the mountains for zebra again to start off the day. Within 500 yards of leaving the house, there was a group of 5 kudu including one young bull with a horns around 40” standing 50 yards off the trail, carefree. My dad was looking for something closer to 50” and Adab said that he was a prime breeding bull so we continued on.

    About a mile before we got into the hills, we had a large Red Heartbeest bull bust out of the brush and stop broadside at 100 yards. This was the first and last animal that we shot from the back of the truck but, alas, my dad was up for his shot and he was still disappointed in himself from the missed shot the day before. My dad rested his rifle on the spare tire mounted to the top of the cab, safety went off and boom, we had a Red Heartbeest on the ground before 0745!

    As we approached the animal, it suddenly became obvious that he had not shot any normal Heartbeest, but a true trophy. This bull was a giant, and upon our departure home and measurement by Philip, we were told that it was the largest taken off of the conservancy that he had personally measured! Quite a special trophy!

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    Erik, Erle my father, and Adab
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    With the early hour we hurried up and loaded the Heartbeest up and continued on towards the mountain where we glassed a large herd of zebra that were well over a mile away as the crow flies and would have taken the rest of the day to get to them on foot if they stayed put, so we continued on in search of another group.

    We moved on and got to the top of the highest peak the road crossed where we all exited the truck and walked a few hundred yards to a large rocky outcropping that overlooks over miles and miles of unobstructed landscape. While sitting there, we quickly located several groups of Gemsbok on the hills and a large group of Heartbeest back towards the valley. We continued to glass when Adab spotted a group of about 10 Kudu at over 1100 yards, and there were 3 bulls. One was barely taller than his ears, another bull was very similar to the one we had passed on in the morning, and one that you could see was obviously larger bodied and his horns much larger and significantly darker rubbing his head in the trees. Adab said he thought he was over 50” so we started the descent. The walk downhill took us a good half hour, during which time the group slowly moved up the hillside they were grazing on. There was a large clearing between us and their current position that forced us to stay a bit further back in the dense brush than we had hoped, so Adab set up the shooting sticks through a window in the brush and my day set up for the shot. I was watching through my binoculars, and BOOM my dad took the shot. I saw dirt fly above the kudus back and the group took off over the hill. MISS! He (and Adab) cussed and we headed to where we had last seen them.

    As we crested the top of that ridge, they were nowhere to be found. My dad was devastated, so we took a minute to catch our breath and started glassing from our new vantage point. After a few minutes, Adab (as usual) had located a lone Oryx about 600 yards away, standing alone in the shade of a tree. He told us that the old bulls will be out alone like that and if my dad wanted to go after him it would be a good animal. While we had not expected to hunt a second Gemsbok, his recent miss and the relative affordability of the trophy fees on Gemsbok make the decision to pursue the bull a go. We slowly made our way towards him, as he was facing us with his back to the bowl of a hillside that was behind him so a big move would have sent him packing. We continued closer and closer, and got to a good spot for a shot when a ranch hand on a horse crested the top of the hill behind him and sent him running.

    Luckily the horse rider was on a mission and the Gemsbok decided to stop and look back at the movement. At that point we set up, got a range and at 225yds my dad hammered his second Gemsbok.
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    It was a nice break at that point in the day, so we loaded up the animal and headed back to the house to drop off my fathers two trophies and eat lunch. We also spent some time practicing dry firing rather than taking a siesta to try to help diagnose why my dad had pulled his shots. The practice seemed to help as we saw later in the trip.

    Vudu the farm Rhodesian Ridgeback
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    Our evening was headed in the same direction as the night before when I had shot my Kudu, and we had a great hunt of a large herd of Black Wildebeest, the only animal I was taking alone on this trip. We located a large herd with several mature bulls and I put a bullet through the heart of my bull at 170 yards. We set him up for a few quick pictures, and quickly loaded him up so we could continue on in hopes of finding a warthog before dusk.
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    Namibia had a especially good rain this season, so the grasses were all up to the tops of the back of most of the warthogs we saw. This made for very fun stalks on multiple hogs that ended up being females with large babies or immature boars. Even though we didn’t find a good boar, the hunt was as much fun as you could ask for.

    We headed back to the houses for our usual delicious meal, lots of cocktails by the fire pit and another night of solid sleep. Three animals down for the day and still 7 days left to hunt!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 14, 2018

  18. BRICKBURN

    BRICKBURN AH ENABLER SUPER MODERATOR CONTRIBUTOR LIFETIME TITANIUM BENEFACTOR AH Ambassador

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    That Hartebeest is a MONSTER. That Black Wildebeest is not too bad either.
     

  19. hoguer

    hoguer AH Member

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    Day 4

    Normal morning routine, on the truck by 0700, but today we were joined by Cole, a visiting guide from Canada who had come down to spend some time at the property for some exposure to the African hunting experience. Cole had already been at the ranch for about 6 weeks and we enjoyed his company each day prior to todays hunt back at the house, but he had been riding with Yancey and his hunting group up until this point. Yancey departed this morning with several great trophies of his own, and now Cole was our extra set of eyes for the rest of the week.

    We headed back up the hill, still looking to fill our elusive Mountain Zebra tags. As we headed up the hill we saw a large group of zebra that were headed away from us, and Adab and Erik had a quick conversation about the best route to take in the truck for a drop point in hopes of intercepting them. A plan was made and we were off to the races.

    Once in position, we jumped off of the truck and headed up a hill, hoping to come over the top and find them again. As we crested the hill, we were all surprised to find them on the next ridge at about 300 yards and moving slowly. We spent a minute checking them out when Adab pointed out a interesting observation: it was a group of 12 stallions. Quite an unusual site. Since I was up for the first shot, we had a quick discussion and my father was going to be setup for a nearly simultaneous follow up shot once I fired in hopes of taking two animals at once.

    I set up on the shooting sticks, picked my target and pulled the trigger to a solid thud of an impact, and my dad followed suit with a shot and SMACK. The entire group started running uphill, and in the confusion it was difficult to pick out our animals, but after about a 30 yard run two zebra were obviously slower than the rest. One peeled off to the left and was running side hill with a wound we could now see bleeding, and the second was slowing down and showing signs of a mortal wound in its body language. My dad put a great shot into the one running on the side hill and rolled him in his sprint, and I put a follow up shot in the dying one to finish him off as quickly as possible. Two zebra stallions down!!!

    After analyzing the first round impacts on the animals, it was discovered that the side hill zebra that my dad finished was the zebra I shot first, and the one I put down was his animal. We had quite an interesting challenge ahead of us with our two beasts, as Mountain Zebra get their nick name for good reason. The terrain was steep and rocky and there was no good way to get the truck to their current position. We ended up gently rolling them down to the bottom of the draw and we were able to get the truck in to load them from there.

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    The colors of the face of a Mountain Zebra are mesmerizing, and we are so happy we added these to our hunting list

    With a truck FULL of Zebra and the long extrication process that had unfolded, we headed back to the house for an early arrival for lunch and some rest. Our lunch was delicious as usual and a few Windhoek Lagers put us both right to sleep.


    The evening came quickly and we headed out to look for a good warthog, Red Heartbeest or Blue Wildebeest and when we were approaching a lake on the property we spotted the back of a hog moving through the grass. We jumped out of the truck and began the stalk, as its tail was till down and it was moving casually. As we had seen so many other times, a closer inspection found that it was a healthy sow with two big piglets with her, but since our stalk was going so well we decided to push it until she busted us and we got to within 30 yards before our cover was blown.

    On the way back to the truck, I spotted a second warthog at about 150 yards moving towards the water, and luck would have it something spooked it and it changed directions and started moving our general direction! A quick look through the glass confirmed that it was a mature boar and I setup on the sticks waiting for him to pause for a clear shot. As he got closer and closer, Adab started to yelp quietly in order to get his attention and he stopped broadside at 60 yards, ears and head perked up for the strange sound. BOOM, SMACK! We suddenly had a warthog running at full sprint with a red geyser gushing out of his side that everyone in the group could see with their naked eye, and he disappeared into the brush. It took us 0.2 seconds to find the giant blood trail and follow it still a solid 80 yards to where a pretty impressive death event happened. The boar in his sprint had run head first into a large slate rock jutting out of the ground, breaking off a large slab of rock and leaving a blood splatter like something out of a horror movie, FLIPPED over the rock and was found dead on the other side. When we turned him over we discovered he had broken off one of his upper tusks, but a quick search found it about 5 feet away. Talk about an impact! Wish he died on impact of the bullet, but he was a dead pig running, and I am going to keep his broken tusk broken and mount it below his scull on the wood backing of his European mount and have an impressive story to tell the boys when they come by the house!

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    The evening continued on we had a beautiful walk through the bush, spotted a huge group of Black Wildebeest with a GIANT bull that I wish I had waited for, but that is hunting! We headed back to the lodge for an amazing dinner, lots of gin and more fun stories around the campfire. 6 more days!

    First course of dinner in the main dining area. Amazing soup with homemade bread is just the way to start any meal!
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    **More To Follow Tomorrow**
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 14, 2018

  20. BRICKBURN

    BRICKBURN AH ENABLER SUPER MODERATOR CONTRIBUTOR LIFETIME TITANIUM BENEFACTOR AH Ambassador

    Joined:
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    Very unique markings on your Kudu. I hope that cape was treated well.
    Congratulations.
     

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