Mauser Rifle Repair vs Restock

WebleyGreene455

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Hello all,

I'm hoping to get started on a custom, or semi-custom, rifle build before too long once I've purchased the donor gun. What I've got in mind is converting a worn-out, inexpensive Mauser G.98 from 9x57mm to 9.3x62mm. Along with the rebarrel and bolt modification, the stock (which I'm more than happy to keep using if I can) would need to be bedded for the octagonal-to-round barrel I want to replace the existing round one with. There is one issue, though. The stock has a crack behind the receiver tang. How big or bad, I don't know (buying this rifle online) but my question is this:

Should I repair the cracked stock if possible and hopefully save some $$ or would I be better off just up and replacing the stock?

I'd also appreciate any suggestions y'all might have for someone to do the rifle work I need.

Kindest regards,
~~W.G.455

(EDIT: If this should go under Gunsmithing would someone be so kind as to move it please, if at all possible?)
 

sestoppelman

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Depends how bad the crack and whether it will bug you or not. I have repaired cracks in that area on some guns, not too big a deal if it isn't too bad. I drill a 1/4" hole into the stock in line with the crack, then dowel it with epoxy. Do it in the tang recess so it wont be seen after.
 

WebleyGreene455

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Depends how bad the crack and whether it will bug you or not. I have repaired cracks in that area on some guns, not too big a deal if it isn't too bad. I drill a 1/4" hole into the stock in line with the crack, then dowel it with epoxy. Do it in the tang recess so it wont be seen after.
I think I'd be most concerned simply with it getting worse or even failing but repairing it even with an obvious repair or pins would not necessarily upset me at all, assuming it's not bad enough to warrant a replacement stock. I suppose I'd just have to see it before I decided.
 

Pheroze

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Replace the stock, pillar bed it, and it will be a dream. I was totally blown away how much a difference a good stock makes. It seems to take forever, but it will do justice to the semi-custom conversion. Especially since stock work will be required with the new barrel. Good luck!
 

WebleyGreene455

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Replace the stock, pillar bed it, and it will be a dream. I was totally blown away how much a difference a good stock makes. It seems to take forever, but it will do justice to the semi-custom conversion. Especially since stock work will be required with the new barrel. Good luck!
That was what I was leaning towards doing, although I'm not 100% on pillar bedding. I've never had a rifle bedded before and know very little about it. Have you a suggestion for a good stock maker or someone who can do the work for me in the USA?
 

Pheroze

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I am in Canada. I can highly recommend http://lemieuxarmuriers.com/en I believe they work with Americans a lot. But, I have no doubt there are more than a few that folks can recommend in the USA. They recommended the pillar bedding.
 

bruce moulds

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looks like a good excuse to buy a quality synthetic stock.
properly bedded you might only have to zero it once in your life once you have standardised a load.
and you can use it in any climatic conditions.
bruce.
 

WebleyGreene455

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There's nothing wrong with synthetic, just not on an oldschool Mauser like this one! My goal is to restore the rifle to what a hunter/explorer/"obtainer of rare antiquities" would've had pre-1945, and while I'd happily use a synthetic on a more recent vintage, there's nothing like a classic wood-and-steel.
 

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Can you post a picture of the stock, that way we can look at the crack and give you a more definite recommendation on repair vs replace.
 

WebleyGreene455

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Can you post a picture of the stock, that way we can look at the crack and give you a more definite recommendation on repair vs replace.
I'd love to but I haven't got the rifle yet. Will share a pic ASAP when I do.
 

Shootist43

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Can you simply purchase a used but serviceable G-98 stock and replace the one that is cracked? Old Military stocks are seldom a thing of beauty. Were you thinking about trying to achieve the look of a Pre- War Mauser sporting rifle?
 

WebleyGreene455

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Can you simply purchase a used but serviceable G-98 stock and replace the one that is cracked? Old Military stocks are seldom a thing of beauty. Were you thinking about trying to achieve the look of a Pre- War Mauser sporting rifle?
It's actually already a pre-war sporting rifle, not a military-issue G.98. My intention is either to repair the current damage or have the existing sporting stock copied.
 

Shootist43

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Thanks for the clarification. Now your motives are much clearer. From my limited experience, stocks just don't crack. There is a reason for it. Once the reason why the stock cracked is determined and "repaired" you might consider repairing the stock itself. In either case I wouldn't consider this a DIY Project.
 

WebleyGreene455

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Thanks for the clarification. Now your motives are much clearer. From my limited experience, stocks just don't crack. There is a reason for it. Once the reason why the stock cracked is determined and "repaired" you might consider repairing the stock itself. In either case I wouldn't consider this a DIY Project.
My guess is that since the rifle appears to lack the recoil lug/nut that military-issued rifles had, that'd be the most likely culprit. I intend to add one. But no, this wouldn't be a DIY even if it was just a (relatively) simple repair job, since I have little experience with the finer points of woodworking or making a stock. I'd rather have a professional repair-and-bed it, if not replace it outright.
 

fourfive8

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Seems like a perfect way to practice/learn a little DIY gun repair with no risk and little to no investment other than time. If not, just search out a gunsmith who specializes in stock fitting... then open the wallet. :)
 

WebleyGreene455

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Seems like a perfect way to practice/learn a little DIY gun repair with no risk and little to no investment other than time. If not, just search out a gunsmith who specializes in stock fitting... then open the wallet. :)
Well maybe. Gotta see what the crack's like, and decide if I want to deal with the barrel stuff first.
 

fourfive8

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Understood- sometimes projects can get out of hand... I know by experience. :) But no need to expend a bunch of $ in the attempt with most of the investment being time. And if it doesn't work out and you can toss the whole thing into the stove with no great loss :)

The crack is not a big problem. If the wood is badly oil soaked, a good soaking and draining and absorbing a few times with denatured alcohol is about all that can be done. Then determine the best placement for a cross bolt if needed. Cross pinning the crack will make for the strongest repair. Drill through perpendicular to the crack and axis of the stock and use good stock bedding compound to glue a pin (like a section of screw or bolt) slightly longer than the outside to outside span into place across the crack and inject same compound into crack. You might be able to open the crack up slightly with a wedge or something to make sure compound is in as much of the crack as possible. Clamp and let set for a day or so. The barrel channel is another critter. You can file, chisel or shave the high lines (of the oct profile) until the new barrel fits with a small amount clearance for the bedding compound. Then bed the whole action and barrel channel with the same compound used on the repair- being sure to match the color of the original wood with the stains available for the compound. The most positive point of this full length bedding is that it sill greatly strengthen the whole stock.
 

WebleyGreene455

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Understood- sometimes projects can get out of hand... I know by experience. :) But no need to expend a bunch of $ in the attempt with most of the investment being time. And if it doesn't work out and you can toss the whole thing into the stove with no great loss :)

The crack is not a big problem. If the wood is badly oil soaked, a good soaking and draining and absorbing a few times with denatured alcohol is about all that can be done. Then determine the best placement for a cross bolt if needed. Cross pinning the crack will make for the strongest repair. Drill through perpendicular to the crack and axis of the stock and use good stock bedding compound to glue a pin (like a section of screw or bolt) slightly longer than the outside to outside span into place across the crack and inject same compound into crack. You might be able to open the crack up slightly with a wedge or something to make sure compound is in as much of the crack as possible. Clamp and let set for a day or so. The barrel channel is another critter. You can file, chisel or shave the high lines (of the oct profile) until the new barrel fits or whatever is needed for clearance. Then bed the whole action and channel with the same compound used on the repair- being sure to match the color of the original wood with the stains available for the compound. The most positive point of this full length bedding is that it sill greatly strengthen the whole stock.
Wow thanks! If the stock is serviceable, I can give it a try. If it works out, even better! And if not, well, I can salvage the buttplate and swivels and see about having the stock copied and/or replaced.
 
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fourfive8

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If you decide to go ahead with the attempt, for the cross pin get a 6" x 1/8 or 3/16 all thread bolt and cut it to slightly longer than the outside to outside dimension of the stock. When all the bedding compound is set up and everything else is done including the barreled action bedded, just file off the bolt stubs on each end even with the stock and sand/finish the whole stock as per normal. Before starting stock finish/vanish just put some good cold blue on the bolt stub ends. You could countersink and add custom cross pin nuts on each side, the kind you see on many factory and custom guns, but that is a another project in itself. Drill the pilot hole for the cross pin equal diameter to whatever bolt or screw diameter you use. The bedding compound in the cross pin hole and crack will secure the pin. The trick is drilling the cross pin hole as perpendicular as possible to both longitudinal axises. A drill press set up with a simple DIY point to point jig would help- maybe do a search for an article or video on line to show that. ... best of luck!
 
 

 

 

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