Libyan Desert Diorama

Discussion in 'Articles' started by Jeff Schaeffer, Jul 7, 2019.

  1. Jeff Schaeffer

    Jeff Schaeffer AH Senior Member

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  2. Ridgewalker

    Ridgewalker AH ENABLER LIFETIME BRONZE BENEFACTOR AH Legend

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    The museum of natural history is an outstanding place to visit!
     

  3. CAustin

    CAustin AH ENABLER BRONZE SUPPORTER AH Ambassador

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    Need to go see this someday
     

  4. Jeff Schaeffer

    Jeff Schaeffer AH Senior Member

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    There was another recent post by Atlas Obscura about the Okapi diorama, and how one of the artists placed a North American chipmunk in it as a joke. The entire thing was largely the work of Carl Akeley.

    Another good read about how Carl Akeley revolutionized taxidermy to make the animals lifelike is "Kingdom Under Glass" by Jay Kirk. Before Akeley, taxidermy was largely about horrible caricatures, and he found the secret to making them come alive. He was the force behind the hall of mammals and although it was built in the early 1900's it remains vibrant and a visitor favorite to this day. You can google Akeley Hall of African Mammals and see photos of some dioramas, although they are worth the trip to see them in person. To me, the cool part are the backgrounds that blend so seamlessly that you can't tell where the exhibit ends and the background begins.
     
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