Krieghoff Replacement Stock

Discussion in 'Double Rifles' started by Ed Lally, Apr 2, 2019.

  1. Ed Lally

    Ed Lally AH Member

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    Has anyone had any experience with replacing a Kriegkhoff stock??

    I recently purchased a new (to me) Krieghoff Classic Big Five in .470NE. I purchased this firearm because I believe that this maker provides me with an extremely safe, accurate and dependable firearm within my budget. I also purchased this particular firearm because it has beautiful wood and very tasteful engraving.

    upload_2019-4-2_12-15-54.png upload_2019-4-2_12-16-59.png upload_2019-4-2_12-17-44.png

    Therein lies the rub, best defined by the back story: In 1972 a great friend and I drew coveted tags to hunt elk and mule deer out of Moran Wyoming. We booked a 10 day horseback elk/mule deer hunt out of Moran Wyoming to hunt the southern fringes of the Teton Wilderness area and Yellowstone Park. We then decided that we needed more appropriate firearms for this hunt (any excuse for a new rifle) and decided on a pair of beautifully stocked Weatherby .300 magnums topped with Leupold VariX scopes. Absolutely beautiful wood!!! Mirror bright bluing that was equally beautiful! When we arrived in camp, I was assigned a trusty but tired horse. During the hunt, up and down extreme grades at elevations around 9000 to 10000 feet, it became apparent that my steed would do anything to lighten his load, consisting of me (0nly 175#) and my rifle. Every tree, rock outcropping and significant bush we passed was used by this horse to try and rub/scrape me off his back. My legs and the buttstock of my rifle took a terrible beating, both receiving several scrapes and gouges. While my scratched and gouged legs healed, my stock never recovered. The next few trips were to Newfoundland for moose, caribou and rain. And more rain. Net result: (despite daily disassembly, cleaning and oiling) a beatup stock on a firearm with a serious need for re-blueing. The solution was simple, I had all metal parts chemically cleaned, the barrel and receiver bead-blasted and all metal parts coated with a mil-spec dry lubricant. A new synthetic composite stock completed the conversion. No problems with this weatherproof firearm since, however, I have no desire to repeat this procedure with my most recent purchase and I am considering purchasing a replacement stock for use on trips which may expose this firearm to rough or wet conditions. The fore stock looks to be no problem but I have concerns regarding replacement of the buttstock. Suggestions and comments?? Thanks.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 3, 2019

  2. TTundra

    TTundra AH Enthusiast

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    No Disrespect Ed, but if you bought it as a show piece, leave it in the safe. If you bought it to hunt with...HUNT with it! That rifle needs to see field in its current form IMHO and make that builder proud.

    You can always have it restocked and reblued after you have your dream hunts with it if need be.
     
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  3. spike.t

    spike.t AH ENABLER SPONSOR Since 2013 AH Ambassador

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    Presumably you going to use it in an African country?.........so when you are hunting there is not much chance of rain......you will be carrying it not a horse.......as said above what's the point of buying it if you worried about using it.......i have carried some pretty expensive rifles in the bush and never gave it a second thought. ....they can be refinished if needs be.......too much worrying about certain things on this site that aren't worth bothering about.........:D Beers:
     

  4. Bushpig4Ever

    Bushpig4Ever AH Enthusiast

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    Why don‘t you purchase another stock? I can get you one.
     

  5. southern_fowler

    southern_fowler AH Member

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    Use the gun as is. Every scratch or nick it gets will be a memory you can relive every time you pull it out. I have yet to take my double to Africa but I drag that thing all over my farm just in case a get charged my a rabid armadillo or pig.

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 2, 2019

  6. CAustin

    CAustin AH ENABLER BRONZE SUPPORTER AH Ambassador

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    That double is for buff, hippo, elephant, rhino, lion and such.....dangerous game. You will carry the rifle while walking and stalking as Spike noted and your outfitter/ph will provide a soft case to use in the vehicle. You should purchase a gun sock, $15, to slip the rifle in while in said soft case. I took my Americase into the field and had the rifle in it when not in use. The back of a back is is a great place for your solid gun case.
    Wipe it down every time it goes back in the sock and case to remove dust. Oil it down every night with a dab of gun oil. If it were to rain...so what....Wipe it down and move on.
    Took mine on hippo hunt and didn’t put a scratch on it. My PH didn’t scratch his either. If you can be careful and not stumble all over yourself you will not scratch yours up either.
    Now let someone get that dangerous game hunt planned and put the Big Bore to work.

    0EE152EE-AC56-427B-B2B8-D3841BE8BDDE.jpeg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 2, 2019
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  7. Ed Lally

    Ed Lally AH Member

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    Good advice, gun sock on order as well as a large package of individually packaged Rem Wipes. Thanks.
     

  8. dougfinn

    dougfinn AH Member

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    Next time you ride a horse like that one, let it know who’s boss. Pull the reins to steer it away from objects when you see it heading for them. Usually that’s all you need to do. If it’s being stubborn you can dig your heels into his side to help persuade it.
     
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  9. AZDAVE

    AZDAVE AH Elite

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    Hunt it as is, sandpaper, red-oil and a hand rubbed oil refinish is cheap and the memories of how each dent or scratch will last a lifetime.
     

  10. crs

    crs AH Enthusiast

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    "of how each dent or scratch will last a lifetime."
    Indeed!
    When my 100+ year old Parker Damascus 20 gauge was off-face and sent to be "fixed", I told the smith to clean the stocks, but leave the rock dents and barb wire scratches alone. Those are evidence of a lifetime of hard hunting by the original owner and rough and tumble hunting by my brothers and me as teenagers. I want to remember those good times.
     

  11. Opposite Pole

    Opposite Pole AH Enthusiast

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  12. Ed Lally

    Ed Lally AH Member

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    Thanks for all the good advice and information. Regarding riding a horse. Good information also. We had horses from the time my kids were 8 until after college. My daughter went on to raise champion Dutch Warmbloods. We are horse people. Our Wyoming outfitter, Bud Nelson, followed the rodeo curcuit and purchased bucking horses which learned that they did not have to buck. These unbroken horses were big, strong and cheap. He broke them to be pack animals and they never bucked off a load. Eventually, he broke some to ride. These were headstrong animals but we're great at carrying hunters week after week at elevations around 10,000 and higher. My horse decided he had enough of this and wanted me off and despite my pulling his head around to almost touch his neck, he continued on his chosen path and continually rubbed my right leg and rifle stock against every available tree. After a few days of this, I packed a small 6" long piece of fire wood and waited for the right situation. When my trusty steed refused to be led through a very difficult section of trail, I tried three times to lead him through, then jumped up and gave him a roundhouse smack on the center if his forehead. After that, bo problems, he went wherever I directed but the damage to my Weatherby stock was done. Regarding my Krieghoff, I think I'll just take it hunting. If I decide to get a beater stock, Krieghoff has these for between $200 and $600 on their online store.
     

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