FN project gun find- but with questions ...

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I’m looking at a similar rifle in 30/06, serial number 16XXX. It has a Lyman 48 on it, no rear sight. Did these some D/T from the factory? The seller seems to think the rear hole may be a little bit off. The stock looks like it’s a good piece of wood, straight comb, an oil finish would do wonders.
Any thoughts?
View attachment 435333

Nice rifle. An easy way to eyeball the rear hole is to remove the bolt, flip the rifle upside down and look at the holes relative to the raceway in on the top of the rear bridge from the inside. Offset holes will stick out like a sore thumb. This is easiest with the action out of the stock.

If they are off, they may be correctable with 8-40s or if not, custom bases, which will give it a nice semi-custom look.
 
Nice rifle. An easy way to eyeball the rear hole is to remove the bolt, flip the rifle upside down and look at the holes relative to the raceway in on the top of the rear bridge from the inside. Offset holes will stick out like a sore thumb. This is easiest with the action out of the stock.

If they are off, they may be correctable with 8-40s or if not, custom bases, which will give it a nice semi-custom look.
That sounds easier than filling it with a TIG!
 
Its an late 1940s FN sporter. You have a real gem there.
Late 40’s or early 50’s? And is there a difference between the two?
 
I wonder what happened to the OP and his project?
 
Late 40’s or early 50’s? And is there a difference between the two?
The reason I guessed late 40s is because of the low S/N. They began making them in 1946 for the European market and sold most of them to GIs through the PXs. In 1948 Firearms International began to import them into the U.S. Most of the guns made in the first 2 years were 30'06s. In 48 when FI began importing then they were chambered in other calibers including 270Win for the U.S. market. Considering all of that a good guess would be 48 or 49.
 
The reason I guessed late 40s is because of the low S/N. They began making them in 1946 for the European market and sold most of them to GIs through the PXs. In 1948 Firearms International began to import them into the U.S. Most of the guns made in the first 2 years were 30'06s. In 48 when FI began importing then they were chambered in other calibers including 270Win for the U.S. market. Considering all of that a good guess would be 48 or 49.
Thanks for the info, I looked last night for a database for serial numbers, but didn’t come across anything. But I didn’t put that much effort into it.

Sadly someone beat me to it, so unless that falls through, I saved myself $800
 
Late 40’s or early 50’s? And is there a difference between the two?

Hi Aaron N

I found this post on another forum and it provides a useful summary of the evolution of the FN Mauser action.

“prewar FN actions designated for sporting purposes appear mechanically and structurally identical to their military counterparts.

The following are highlights of FN commercial post WWII action production changes as they increasingly departed in features from their military brethren. .

1. Introduction in 1946 of a sporting model action. Principal modification of the military action limited to bolt handle redesign. This introduced the sweeping low scope bolt configuration that would become a signature element of the commercial line.

2. Approximately1948, significant modifications consisting of: elimination of the ‘thumb cut’ to facilitate a strengthened solid left receiver wall, elimination of elevated receiver bridge and clip loading recess, low scope safety more often incorporated on models designated for the U.S. market. “Chrome Vanadium Steel” barrel markings routinely appeared.

3. Approximately 1950, engineering modification of the so-called ‘full C’ inner receiver ring. The inner ring against which the barrel abuts was altered from a single cut necessary to accommodate the long mauser extractor, to include a second non functional cut. The modification was made for production simplification. Technically the receiver strength was slightly compromised. The practical effect was nil. It is my belief that this change was all FN mauser action production, sporting and military.

4. Early nineteen fifties: A transitioning period during which receivers were routinely tapped for telescopic sight mounts and corresponding low scope safeties always supplied. The FN logo atop the receiver ring was slowly phased out.

5. Mid nineteen fifties. Introduction of the FN Mauser “Supreme” action which incorporated a redesigned cocking piece housing and side safety lever. Their standard FN mauser action continued also to be offered for some years as a less expensive alternative..

This constituted the principal market wide course of FN mauser product development of their long extractor mauser action. One caveat in interpreting production changes. The ‘newest’ of these rifles are now fortyish years old. Manufacturer component substitutions, special orders, repairs and customizations may be erroneously misinterpreted as standard product-wide production features.

Throughout production, these FN mauser military and commercial actions stood second to none in their markets.”
 
Hi Aaron N

I found this post on another forum and it provides a useful summary of the evolution of the FN Mauser action.

“prewar FN actions designated for sporting purposes appear mechanically and structurally identical to their military counterparts.

The following are highlights of FN commercial post WWII action production changes as they increasingly departed in features from their military brethren. .

1. Introduction in 1946 of a sporting model action. Principal modification of the military action limited to bolt handle redesign. This introduced the sweeping low scope bolt configuration that would become a signature element of the commercial line.

2. Approximately1948, significant modifications consisting of: elimination of the ‘thumb cut’ to facilitate a strengthened solid left receiver wall, elimination of elevated receiver bridge and clip loading recess, low scope safety more often incorporated on models designated for the U.S. market. “Chrome Vanadium Steel” barrel markings routinely appeared.

3. Approximately 1950, engineering modification of the so-called ‘full C’ inner receiver ring. The inner ring against which the barrel abuts was altered from a single cut necessary to accommodate the long mauser extractor, to include a second non functional cut. The modification was made for production simplification. Technically the receiver strength was slightly compromised. The practical effect was nil. It is my belief that this change was all FN mauser action production, sporting and military.

4. Early nineteen fifties: A transitioning period during which receivers were routinely tapped for telescopic sight mounts and corresponding low scope safeties always supplied. The FN logo atop the receiver ring was slowly phased out.

5. Mid nineteen fifties. Introduction of the FN Mauser “Supreme” action which incorporated a redesigned cocking piece housing and side safety lever. Their standard FN mauser action continued also to be offered for some years as a less expensive alternative..

This constituted the principal market wide course of FN mauser product development of their long extractor mauser action. One caveat in interpreting production changes. The ‘newest’ of these rifles are now fortyish years old. Manufacturer component substitutions, special orders, repairs and customizations may be erroneously misinterpreted as standard product-wide production features.

Throughout production, these FN mauser military and commercial actions stood second to none in their markets.”
I came across that as well, which led me to believe it to be early 50’s due to the D/T, but other than that I have no other reason to draw that conclusion.
 
Sometimes a date is stamped on the right side of the lug underneath the wood line. Any other proof marks on/underneath?
 
See an AH post I had done some time back. It provides essentially the same info as the one noted above, although with more details and specifics.


In my estimation Aaron N the telltale signs to date the .30-06 that you were looking at are:
  1. Because the action does not have the thumb cut, stripper clip hump (and most likely not the clip cut either), and because the rear bridge is drilled and tapped for a receiver peep sight on the right side, it was likely made no earlier than 1949.
  2. Because the rifle still has the military pattern metal bottom, it was likely made no later than 1949.
Chances are pretty good that this is a 1949 rifle.
 
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See an AH post I had done some time back. It provides essentially the same info as the one noted above, although with more details and specifics.


In my estimation Aaron N the telltale signs to date the .30-06 that you were looking at are:
  1. Because the action does not have the thumb cut, stripper clip hump (and most likely not the clip cut either), and because the rear bridge is drilled and tapped for a receiver peep sight on the right side, it was likely made no earlier than 1949.
  2. Because the rifle still has the military pattern metal bottom, it was likely made no later than 1949.
Chances are pretty good that this is a 1949 rifle.
So what you’re saying, is it’s a ‘49!
Sir, you are always a wealth of knowledge:)
 
This may help with the age, should be on the recoil lug area

1636323514706.png
 
Hoping someone can point me in the right direction. I recently inherited a gem circa 1950 firearms international Washington DC 270 with the chrome vanadium barrel. Upon receiving it it appears that in its lifetime someone saw fit to remove the rear sight. I will be having this firearm fully restored but am looking for any possible place I can find an original replacement part. If any of y’all could provide this information I would be in your debt as you have already provided a wealth of knowledge on the subject. Many thanks in advance
 
It's a shame that someone bought it before you. That FN is a jewel in the rough.
 
It's a shame that someone bought it before you. That FN is a jewel in the rough.
In researching I have found some period correct options that have been sent to my broker to get a period correct aperture installed. My smith and I have confirmed her to be a 1948 import number 35*… she is currently getting cleaned properly and waiting her install and I can’t wait to load test and carry this piece on my adventures to come! She’s a beaut!
 
MY FN (made in Sweeden) is a 98 action in 9.3x62 from the factory and never D&T, Your rifle is an awesome find and perfect for a rebore In my opinion. The FN Supreme...
 

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