First Aid Kit for hunters

I’ve carried both steri strips and super glue for laceration closure… but have replaced those options with this…


Inexpensive… super easy to use.. and super effective and fast…
 

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@Just Gina my first aid kit also includes Nescafé instant coffee pouches. Seriously.

I also bring some nuun tabs (electrolytes) for helping someone come back from dehydration.

I generally carry a combo of what was posted above. Athletic tape, electrical tape and paracord seem to get used a lot.
I suppose there are 3 levels of first aid: uncomfortable, ouch, and big problem. The OP seemed more focused on big problems, but I agree 95% are “uncomfortable” and a small percentage of “ouch”.

The first aid kit Tylenol, ibuprofen and tweezers get pilfered the most.
 
Level 1&2 great, when we get to level 3 & higher most need a bit of training.

While doing a first aid course we included our camp staff & tracker.
Without anyone knowing it we were able to set up a phony elephant attack. It was interesting to see the reactions. Was the big first aid kit forgotten, no. Transportation, body board. Who goes who remains at lodge.

Overall it went will (the workes) thought it was real. They learned that paper and pen, cell phone is as important as a bandage.

Got it, train with it

Lon
 
Level 1&2 great, when we get to level 3 & higher most need a bit of training.

While doing a first aid course we included our camp staff & tracker.
Without anyone knowing it we were able to set up a phony elephant attack. It was interesting to see the reactions. Was the big first aid kit forgotten, no. Transportation, body board. Who goes who remains at lodge.

Overall it went will (the workes) thought it was real. They learned that paper and pen, cell phone is as important as a bandage.

Got it, train with it

Lon

Completely agree…

First Aid is exactly that… just the first step…

I also keep a civilianized “9-line” form in my kit.. that I or anyone else can fill out (to the best of their ability)… additionally I keep a little checklist of information responders are going to want to know about the patient (vitals, nature of injury, age, sex, responsive to touch, etc etc)… this is the sort of information a responder is likely going to ask when you call… but what if you’re having to send someone a mile or two away where they can get a cell signal or get to a radio? Being able to jot it down for them to take with so they can report it properly is key (they will likely be under stress, emotionally and possibly physically exhausted, etc)…

being able to contact higher medical care is important… knowing what to communicate to them is equally if not more important..
 
I use "Conterra" Radio chest/harness. Africa, ?. The ALS years, they had nice compact kits .. I'm sure a lot do now.
 

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Main Medical Kit contains:

Bottle of Alcohol
Bootle of Hydrogen Peroxide
Bottle of Regular (non flavored) Listorine
Bottle of Tincture of Iodine
Assortment Size Rolls of Gauze
Assortment Size Bandaids
Assortment Size Gauze Pads
Mole Skin
Ace Wraps/Bandages
Wound Dressing Bandages (military type)
Triangular Bandages (Slings)
Various Widths Stretch and Non Stretch
Scotch Tape
Medical Scissors
Knife
Scalpel
Small and Long Twizzers
Forceps
Hemostats
Tongue Depressors
Ben Gay
Assortment of Antibiotic Creams
Alcohol Wipes
Eye Glasses Wipes
Ibuprofens (Alieve, Tylenol, etc)
Aspirin
Non Prisciption and Prisciption Pain Killers
Non Prisciption and Prisciption Muscle Relaxers
Vitamins: A, B1, B12, C, D, E
Wet Wipes
Neoprene Gloves
Blood Stop
Instant Ice Packs
Epinephrine Pens
Q Tips
Eye Glasses Repair Kits (3 different types)
Bottle of Contact Lenses Cleaner
Contact Lenses Cases
Spare Eye Glasses and Contact Lenses
Magnifying Glass
Multi Tool (Leatherman, Swiss Army Knife)
Gallon and Quart Size Freezer Bags (Zip Lock)
Sewing Kit
Leather Repair Kit
Dental Hygiene Kit
Cordages (Paracord, Decoy Anchor Cord, Cotton String)
Tarp (6 feet X 8 feet)
Bottled Water (4- 20 ounce bottles)
Water Purification (Filtered Pump, Straws, Tablets)
Powdered Gator Aid
Instant Coffee
Instant Tea
Granola Bars
Metal Cup (20 ounce)
Matches and Cigarette Lighter
Small Candles
Fire Starters
Toilet Paper

Small Medical Kit contains: (separate from Main Medical Kit, and carried in Day Pack)

Wide Roll of Gauze
Wise Roll of Non Strech Tape
Eye Glass Repair Kit
Twizzers
Sewing kit
Small Pair of Scissors
Forceps
Alcohol Wipes
Eye Glasses Wipes
Spare Glasses
Water Purification Tablets
Matches and Cigarette Lighter
Small Candle
Fire Starters

Standard Pack Items:

Duct Tape
Paracord (50 feet)
Field Food Rations (Granola bars, Raman noodles, candy bars, etc)
Metal Cup (20 ounce, separate from Main Medical Kit)
Flashlights with extra batteries (hands free headlight, hand held flashlight)
Diamond Knife Sharpener
Water
Wet Wipes
Toilet Paper

Additional Standard Pack Items are dependent on: type hunt, hunt location, weather,

Main Medical Kit is kept with Main Survival Kit
 
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In addition to the items I previously listed in my main medical and survival kits, I also include a bottle of good whiskey in each one. However, they always seem to come up missing. Especially during the colder months and during hunting camp. Seems sitting around a campfire (actually its now around a fireplace inside a warm comfortable cabin) everyone comes down with a case of the sniffles and in dire need of a (or several) medicinal "hot toddie(s)" and /or several good oral shots of 90 proof cough syrup and preventative morning pain killer before retiring to thier bunk.
 
I like to keep the emergency items separate.

Pouch 1 for serious stop the bleed
CAT tourniquet
Israeli Bandage
Quick Clot gauze
Chest seals

Small Pouch 2 for comforts
Bandaids assortment
100 mph tape on a pen
Mole skin
Ibuprofen
Benadryl
Antibiotic Ointment
Needle
Tweezers

Over the last 20+ years, I think splinters/thorns were #1 "medical" use case followed by bandaids. The pen and strips of 100mph tape have been used countless times.

What do you use the pen for?....
 
Lot of good information and suggestions here. Maxi-pads are definitely amongst the less common items to see in a kit, but I'd recommend them as well. Tampons are great as well --- in a case where there is a deep puncture they come out of their nice sterile package and can be inserted as a plug. Most of my kit is a recreation of some of the others with items like multi-tool (one that I keep in the kit after being sterilized, and not my EDC one), bandages, tweezers, quick clot, CATs, but I also keep the single serve packs of triple antibiotic, cold/allergy meds, headache meds, ibprofen and the like in there. I keep things in two kits...an "essentials" kit and an "expansion pack" if I have the room for it. In my truck, I've got in-floor storage pockets so most of the time I keep them in there, but if I'm going to the wilderness I just pull them, check them and then include them in kit.
 
My daughter was about 7or 8 and we were at our camp for the weekend. Her and her friend are horsing around and she splits her chin wide open. We are hour and a half from nearest hospital, wife freaking out, kids crying. I go to my truck and break outmy superglue gel that I keep to patch myself up. Come back in and wife says, YOU CANT DO THAT ITS A LITTLE GIRLS CHIN. Ok. I drive a hour and a half to ER. Wait another 3 hrs for Dr to come to room. Looks at it and pulls out the $750 an Oz super glue, uses 10 ozs and slaps a $500 bandaid on it and said your good to go. Only reason my wife didn't end up in the ER was she had witnesses and I don't look good in prison orange.
 
All good items listed, I would add a SAM splint and coban wrap.
I vary my first aid kits depending on where and how long I am going.
Lord I hope I never need chest seals in a hunting enviroment. A sucking chest wound would certainly be a bad day. But ,,,,going Cape buff hunting next june so maybe a a few chest seals and chest darts would not be a bad addition.
Hemostic gauze and cat tourniquet is a must. I would also add a broad spectrum antibiotic if you can get it. If you are hurt bad enough to need that much bleeding control, infection is a real possiblity.
 
Mmm....probably going to be obvious...but here I go.... :X3: ..what is coreless duct tape...?
There is no cardboard in the center, so it takes up less space. There is also some sold with much smaller than normal cores like this.
1718741860979.png
 
My daughter was about 7or 8 and we were at our camp for the weekend. Her and her friend are horsing around and she splits her chin wide open. We are hour and a half from nearest hospital, wife freaking out, kids crying. I go to my truck and break outmy superglue gel that I keep to patch myself up. Come back in and wife says, YOU CANT DO THAT ITS A LITTLE GIRLS CHIN. Ok. I drive a hour and a half to ER. Wait another 3 hrs for Dr to come to room. Looks at it and pulls out the $750 an Oz super glue, uses 10 ozs and slaps a $500 bandaid on it and said your good to go. Only reason my wife didn't end up in the ER was she had witnesses and I don't look good in prison orange.
Yep the suture tape and super glue is a game changer
I definitely hate the waste of a ER trip
I have had no choice but to be a emergency vet or doctor many times
a suture staple gun , glue, Benadryl & gauze has saved the day many times when we are
a 1-4 hour drive or a $50,000 helicopter flight away from the ER

a drunk story
3 hour drive from a hospital, and everyone cooter brown drunk , my only sober friend takes a sip of his soda and gets stung by a bee on the tongue , then says “ he is deathly allergic to bees “ I started laughing and said “well you are gonna die before you get to the hospital, but I got you covered “ “ stick out your tongue which I grabbed and picked out the stinger , gave him 4 benadryl and a pat on the back and he was back to normal again
between dogs & kids last 40 years, I probably could be a ER or vet Tech

PSA if you’re a hunter or fisherman keep your life flight insurance & rip cord or Global Rescue up to date
 
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Yep the suture tape and super glue is a game changer
I definitely hate the waste of a ER trip
I have had no choice but to be a emergency vet or doctor many times
a suture staple gun , glue, Benadryl & gauze has saved the day many times when we are
a 1-4 hour drive or a $50,000 helicopter flight away from the ER

a drunk story
3 hour drive from a hospital, and everyone cooter brown drunk , my only sober friend takes a sip of his soda and gets stung by a bee on the tongue , then says “ he is deathly allergic to bees “ I started laughing and said “well you are gonna die before you get to the hospital, but I got you covered “ “ stick out your tongue which I grabbed and picked out the stinger , gave him 4 benadryl and a pat on the back and he was back to normal again
between dogs & kids last 40 years, I probably could be a ER or vet Tech

PSA if you’re a hunter or fisherman keep your life flight insurance & rip cord up to date
Benadryl is a wonder drug.
 
I'd imagine a PH would have the basic's?

Any personal meds for pre, or existing conditions. I'd pack a cigarette
 
When it comes to first aid kits, it is difficult to find the just balance between being ready for anything and overdoing it, and neglecting it...

On my first safari I had a first aid kit that would have done a Squad Medic proud. Short of brain surgery, I could have done about anything in the field, including dealing with chest wound and bullet wound, extensive sutures and amputation - well... almost amputation :E Rofl:

Grossly over done! Never mind that it took half my backpack :E Lol:

Conversely, DO NOT ASSUME that 1) there will be a first aid kit in the hunting truck; 2) that your PH will know anything about first aid; 3) that there will be a medicine kit in camp. In my experience, in the vast majority of cases, you will be in a medical / medicine desert, short of a trip to the nearest town.

Nowadays, after multiple safaris, I limit myself to THREE ITEMS.

1) IFAK (Individual First Aid Kit) - Always in my stalking pack, i.e. always with me in the field:

IFAK.jpg

IFAK designed for field light emergency care:
  • Israeli emergency bandage 4"
  • US emergency cravat triangular bandage
  • US wound dressing
  • Velket tourniquet
  • Quikclot gauze 3' x 24" (x2)
  • Small gauze roll
  • EMT scissors
  • Forceps & tweezers
  • Curad Instant Clotting Flex-Fabric band aids and suture tapes of various sizes
  • Alcohol wipes
  • Moleskin tape
  • Electrolyte tablets
  • Dermabond or SurgiSeal (DO NOT use Super Glue or Krazy Glue on open wounds)
  • Needles (to remove splinters)
  • (+ Zeiss wipes for scope and binocs)
PS: I used to also carry a Chest Seal pack, but not anymore.

2) Basic medicine kit - stays in camp

Medicine kit.jpg

Basic medicine kit designed for routine health maintenance:
  • Advil/Ibuprofen - muscle pain
  • Excedrin/Aspirin - headache
  • Tylenol/Acetaminophen - fever
  • AcidPep - spicy food and excess booze
  • Allegra - allergies
  • Imodium - diahrea
  • Neosporin - infection prevention on myriads of cuts and scratches (I hunt in shorts)
  • Blister Gel Guard / Band Aids / suture tapes of various sizes
  • Clotting Flex-Fabric Band aids of various sizes
  • Alcohol wipes
  • Moleskin padding
  • Lipstick balm

3) Field Rescue and Medical Evacuation subscription

1718748007851.png

For when things really go wrong, from hunting truck accidents, to hunting accidents, to shooting accidents, to any and every medical emergency...

And I would add Extraction Services if I were to go hunting in some African destinations further North...


In summary...

The reality is that safari is not combat deployment, and that anything even remotely serious will get you to a town doctor or hospital. So you need enough to deal with minor incidents in the field - typically cuts and bruises - and enough to deal with comfort in camp - typically blisters, muscle pain and digestion).

If you are serious about anything else, subscribe for the duration of your safari to a field rescue AND medical evacuation service. If things go wrong these will be the best $250 of your entire safari.



PS: I am purposefully not listing what goes in the "possible bag" because these are not medical supplies, but the likes of headlamp, spare batteries, sawing kit, paracord, Leatherman tool, toilet paper, gas lighter, mosquito net, etc. etc. will quasi systematically find a use in any field emergency or even mild annoyance...
 
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